Area Rugs Then and Now

All area rugs history in the United States can be traced back to the year 1791 when the first mill in New England started production. The Philadelphia carpet mill was the first of many in the ensuing years, but the real production era came in 1839 when a man named E. Bigelow invented the first powered loom. Production immediately doubled when this new carpet loom was brought online, and soon was sped up to triple the output. Many new add on or ancillary inventions made to create unique products from the same machine created niche carpet industries that sprouted all over the New England area.

Area Rugs

Then the great retailer Marshall Fields put his hand into the arena and started manufacturing rugs via the industrial automated process, but with a twist on the design, and execution of the production. His machine made tapestries had the appearance of being sewn from the backside of the material like the handmade Persian rugs were normally created. This gave the surface a smooth, and inviting appeal that when marketed to the consumer, was an instant success

Area Rugs Today

Large Area Rugs
Large Area Rugs

The Modern Area Rugs - More Beautiful and Less Expensive

Today, thousands of carpet mills all over the world pump out thousands of area rugs every day, and since most have identical equipment, and the same capabilities there are only a couple of areas available to compete in, and that is price and design. By producing area carpets in other countries that can create a lower overhead, the manufacturer can seemingly compete on an almost unfair level of trade.

This practice combined with veteran graphic design specialist help the loom owner to bring to market a cheaper, and unique product that no one else has at the moment. They say copying someone is the greatest form of flattery, but not in the rug business, and as soon as new design comes out, there are a hundred companies copying the new pattern and reproducing it to compete with the original maker.

How To Clean Area Rugs

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