Arugula, The Nutty Salad Green

Arugula

I first tasted arugula and knew what I was eating about 12 years ago. A few days prior to this most-welcomed discovery, I was at a meeting of a local food action group. These meetings often started with a question or quiz. That day the quiz was what plant I am referring to when I say rocket.

I raised my hand but they would not let me answer. The idea was to get the newbies to learn about plants. Rocket is arugula, a nutty tasting and healthy salad green. Arugula earned the nickname rocket because of its rapid growth.

Some people use arugula as a flavouring because of the nuttiness; however, you use it; arugula will add crispness and flavour to your meal.

If you live in a cold climate this is an ideal green for you; arugula is easy to grow and quite prolific.

Arugula will grow in a variety of soil conditions but really appreciates a soil pH of between 6- 6.8. Be careful of bolting, like most salad greens arugula has a tendency to bolt, (rapid growth, going to seed) when it is hot. You can prevent this but checking on it regularly and harvesting the leaves as you go or if you live in a hot zone, making sure the plants gets some afternoon shade.

Arugula will self-seed but does need help in pollination. You can plant it near an herb or flowering plant that attracts pollinators, although some suggest you do not plant it too close to members of the cabbage family.

You can plant this one in containers or right into a garden bed. In the garden bed, be sure to sow the seeds one inch apart. Plant arugula seeds in rows, if you wish, making sure there is 12 to 18 inches of space between the rows.

Check the seed package for specific planting instructions, but generally speaking you will want to lightly cover the seeds when they have been sown.

You can sow arugula seeds two or three times over the season, (maybe more). When the seedlings are established they may begin to compete with one another for space so thin them.

If you want the arugula to come back year after year, take advantage of the fact this plant is self-seeding and mark the hardiest plants. These are the plants you will allow to go to seed so they can produce next year’s crop.

Arugula is an excellent addition to the cold hardy garden and will provide you with fresh greens, throughout the gardening season.

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Comments 10 comments

Sandyspider profile image

Sandyspider 6 years ago from Wisconsin, USA

I'm not sure I have heard of this one. Thanks.


Bob Ewing profile image

Bob Ewing 6 years ago from New Brunswick Author

You are welcome, thanks for dropping by.


Hello, hello, profile image

Hello, hello, 6 years ago from London, UK

I never heard of it but will look out for it. Thank you.


Bob Ewing profile image

Bob Ewing 6 years ago from New Brunswick Author

Enjoy, thanks for dropping by.


ainehannah profile image

ainehannah 6 years ago from Dublin

Thanks Bob, it's exactly what I needed as an alternative to spinach.


Bob Ewing profile image

Bob Ewing 6 years ago from New Brunswick Author

You are welcome, thanks for dropping by.


jycmba profile image

jycmba 6 years ago from Los Angeles CA

Recently, I discovered that Trader Joe's carries arugala as one of their ready salad mixes - a bit of lemon juice and olive oil makes a vinaigrette that enhances the peppery flavor of this green; add a bit of grated parmesan gradano cheese & you've got a great salad fast.. as a rocket!


Bob Ewing profile image

Bob Ewing 6 years ago from New Brunswick Author

Sounds tasty, thanks for dropping by.


ainehannah profile image

ainehannah 6 years ago from Dublin

Also, raw rocket is lovely whizzed up in a blender with pine nuts, wrapped in lasagne sheets and covered in arabbiata sauce. Bake in the oven for 15-20 mins, it's a hot tomato alternative to a creamy bechamel sauce.


Bob Ewing profile image

Bob Ewing 6 years ago from New Brunswick Author

This sounds tasty, thanks.

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