BUILDING A BETTER BUILDING

From beginning to end...

Ugh!  Home as it was originally.   There was no yard and the front looked like a firehouse!  The roof needed replacing, so I added a cupola as an air vent. (next pictures).
Ugh! Home as it was originally. There was no yard and the front looked like a firehouse! The roof needed replacing, so I added a cupola as an air vent. (next pictures). | Source
Stripped down to bare, beautiful redwood.  The entire home is constructed of Redwood; which is pretty impervious to dry rot and termite infestation/damage.  The exterior wood as well as framework and interior solid 1x6 wall construction is redwood
Stripped down to bare, beautiful redwood. The entire home is constructed of Redwood; which is pretty impervious to dry rot and termite infestation/damage. The exterior wood as well as framework and interior solid 1x6 wall construction is redwood | Source
Home, shortly after new paint but before new garage doors and front lower door
Home, shortly after new paint but before new garage doors and front lower door | Source
Old garage doors still on house..cement all around.  We used sledge hammers to remove it and plant grass/flowering things while leaving the walkway to lower door.  Sadly, it is situated unevenly due to our cement demolition.
Old garage doors still on house..cement all around. We used sledge hammers to remove it and plant grass/flowering things while leaving the walkway to lower door. Sadly, it is situated unevenly due to our cement demolition. | Source
Front door before
Front door before | Source
Roofing sheets
Roofing sheets | Source
Working on the newly installed 'old' front door
Working on the newly installed 'old' front door | Source
Old "new" door
Old "new" door | Source
First step we've located center and cut the beginning of our framework.  here, testing it to see how it fits our alloted space.....and, remember! Measure once, cut twice!  Oh NO!  I mean, MEASURE TWICE, CUT ONCE!
First step we've located center and cut the beginning of our framework. here, testing it to see how it fits our alloted space.....and, remember! Measure once, cut twice! Oh NO! I mean, MEASURE TWICE, CUT ONCE! | Source
Balacing and centering the first part of the structure.  We built most of this in Richard's shop and then attached/installed to the front of the house.
Balacing and centering the first part of the structure. We built most of this in Richard's shop and then attached/installed to the front of the house. | Source
After measuring and settiing the middle point, we constructed the framework in Richard's shop and then placed it over the door, balanced w/long sticks in front
After measuring and settiing the middle point, we constructed the framework in Richard's shop and then placed it over the door, balanced w/long sticks in front | Source
Side view of framework.  We had to use our levels to be sure that we were perfectly parallel to the ground on top and sides while the framework was fastened to two support sticks.
Side view of framework. We had to use our levels to be sure that we were perfectly parallel to the ground on top and sides while the framework was fastened to two support sticks. | Source
Side view for perspective
Side view for perspective | Source
Oh,, we're so proud of ourselves, and we've only just begun...LOLO
Oh,, we're so proud of ourselves, and we've only just begun...LOLO | Source
Taking a break and being silly
Taking a break and being silly | Source
more playing around...."is this where I cut?"
more playing around...."is this where I cut?" | Source
I primed the  beadboard in Richard's shop
I primed the beadboard in Richard's shop | Source
Rchard working on fascia
Rchard working on fascia | Source
i'm using Richard's router to create a scalloped edge on the fascia boards.
i'm using Richard's router to create a scalloped edge on the fascia boards. | Source
Ricard is holding up the fascia so I could "evaluate" it
Ricard is holding up the fascia so I could "evaluate" it | Source
Working on fine tuning. I learned that the front facia required a board smaller in width in order to create the effect we desired.
Working on fine tuning. I learned that the front facia required a board smaller in width in order to create the effect we desired. | Source
Beautiful wrought iron railing
Beautiful wrought iron railing | Source
Beautiful old wrought iron raiing added to stairway to upstairs entry
Beautiful old wrought iron raiing added to stairway to upstairs entry | Source
Bricks arranged around posts...Yes!  We like it so, on to the next step; mixing mortar and setting bricks permanently.
Bricks arranged around posts...Yes! We like it so, on to the next step; mixing mortar and setting bricks permanently. | Source
Working on bricks...at this point, after setting the bricks and allowing them to dry; we acid washed the visable exterior(s) to remove old tar, paint, etc.  We used muratic acid commonly used to clean swimming pools and boats.
Working on bricks...at this point, after setting the bricks and allowing them to dry; we acid washed the visable exterior(s) to remove old tar, paint, etc. We used muratic acid commonly used to clean swimming pools and boats. | Source
Richard working on bricks
Richard working on bricks | Source
Finished bricks.  We  had begun with the idea of having 3 tiers but, soon, decided tht 5 tiers would look better so, off to the 'smash and grab' part of our journey.  We set the poles in cement using metal base pieces which hold wood to cement better
Finished bricks. We had begun with the idea of having 3 tiers but, soon, decided tht 5 tiers would look better so, off to the 'smash and grab' part of our journey. We set the poles in cement using metal base pieces which hold wood to cement better | Source
Curbside view
Curbside view | Source
Close up front view
Close up front view | Source
Street view
Street view | Source
East side Street view
East side Street view | Source
west side view of finished work
west side view of finished work | Source

Curb Appeal is all important!

Recently, my dear friend Richard and I put our heads and hands together in an effort to improve the entryway leading into the lower part of my 100 + year old Victorian home. The outside was “ok,” but not very inviting and so, I began to explore and research designs which would make the home more attractive as well as weather tight. Following is a step by step chronology of our work from beginning to end. We had so much fun, tons of laughter and made so many silly errors which resulted in a number of “do overs.” The neighborhood enjoyed quite a show; encouraging us along the way....


How we did it

Most of the construction was done in Richard's shop and then installed to the house. Before doing this, we replaced the unattractive solid door with an antique, appropriate for the period, door I had brought with me in my recent return from Kansas to California. I knew that the proportions were very close to "just right" for this purpose.

Image is Everything, too!


We began by replacing that solid, nondescript, front door with a nice “15 light” solid, antique entryway door. The space w/which we had to work, along with the expected settling of the house, required creative sanding as well as intricate adjustments to the size of the door so that it would fit properly and swing with ease. This is a common concern when working on older homes; they tend to settle and sink over the years and this causes quirky problems and delicate, precision changes to both door and framing.

As anyone who has read my hubs about restoring old homes and decorating interiors knows; I love working on old, 'period' homes. Demolition is right at the top of my most favorite steps in this process. Design is also something I truly enjoy; it is such a challenge and a great exercise in imagination, and the end results are always so satisfying.

A caveat:

If we don’t like what we’ve done; we back up a few steps and re do it.

Caveat #2:

Measure TWICE, cut ONCE! Remember this, oh intrepid home improvement people! Measure twice, cut once! (you might want to repeat this as a chant a few times...take it from me!)




Additional preparation:

Always try to make sure you've lined all your ducks in a row! First, assemble all tools, nails, screws, different sizes of bits as well as drills for your power drill, sand paper, long electric cords, ladders of several sizes, hammers, saws, levels, chisels, tape measures, and the more exotic electric equipment such as portable jig saws, power sanders of several kinds, routers along with (the always useful) clamps and vice grips together in one, useful and convenient location. Then arrange all essential, larger items such as table saws, reciprocating saws, skill saws, etc. (I'm sure I've forgotten a thing or two!!) near electric outlets.

Word to the wise: If you plan to paint your beautiful addition; consider priming prior to construction. This saves so much time and effort and you'll be able to apply the primer evenly.

Also:

Try to think of all the construction materials you'll need, too. This includes plywood, 2x4's, 4x4's, "finish" fascia and ceiling woods, shingles, tar paper, metal flashing, mortar (if building w/bricks), water, etc.

We gathered bricks from the old, unused chimney; some of which are over 100 years old! We also did a "smash and grab" from a demolition site where the remnants of a chimney were scattered on the ground so, we gathered the good, usable bricks and added them to the few we already had. The size (since they were of the same era) was perfect.


And then, in order of necessity:

1) We measured to dead center above the doorway

2) We used 'snap' string to create exact lines from the center to the outside edges. This presented a bit of a challenge in that there were obstacles in our path. To the right of the door is the framing for the up-stairway and, to the left is the framing for the large, display window. Also, we had to work around the casement of the door, itself.

3) After outlining our outer framework perimeters, we determined our measurement(s) from the face of the home to the walkway in front. (Sadly, due to ADA requirements, I lost about 2 feet of my, already miniscule, front yard). We had to take into account the area that would be needed for the brick structure which we'd laid out for esthetic evaluation. Voila! We loved the effect so, this had to be calculated into the final measuremen meaning that, we'd have to set the front support lumber several more inches in from the sidewalk in order to accomodate the additional space needed to lay the bricks.

The reclaimed, redwood 4 x 4 posts which support the front of the entry roof, have metal footings which set into cement. We dug the holes, poured quickrete (fast drying cement/concrete), and, after it hardened to just the right point, set the posts into the still moist cement. We used levels and tape measures to assure that the distance of both posts was equal to the sidewalk as well as from the front of the house. Later, we set the bricks around the posts.

4) We had to determine the height and grade of the roof line to allow enough of a rise to dispel rainwater while having to work within the room available which was limited due to the windows just above the door.

5) We also had to figure for the shingles, fascia and any "gingerbread" we hoped to add.

6) I love beadboard! God's gift to those of us who like the appearance of fine craftsmanship without actually having to DO it! Must have: beadboard ceiling for the entry way.


7) And we took it from there!

To finish the charming changes we’d created; I pulled out some old, rusty/white wrought iron ‘fencing’ (well, don’t tell but…it’s really window security ironwork!! This was meant to be attached to the outside of windows to keep the bad guys out!), to enclose the tiny boutique garden in front of the house. This finishing touch was just right!




A little history about this ongoing project...


When I first purchased the home,, the first thing I did was to strip centuries old layer after layer after ugly layer of old paint from the entire home. The newly exposed redwood was beautiful! I almost had the home "varnished" rather than painted so that the beautiful grain and quality of the wood would be, forever, shown. Obviously, I decided against that and, in stead, drove around town to get an idea of others' paint choices. I found a wonderful, subtle, pale yellow; "Roman Candle," which I fell in love with. So, I chose that for the body of the home and "Whisper White' for the woodwork.

To the left of the work area, there are two solid doors into the garage entry. One day, I decided to check garage sales, at older homes in the area, which advertised construction materials. Luckily, I found the original style garage doors typical of homes like mine. I scooped them up and brought them to the house. They were in poor condition but, nothing that couldn't be repaired. After cutting, splicing, applying dowling and reconstruction...they were installed and, much to our glee and surprise!, they fit perfectly!

Everything that you see was done by me and my friends. We scalloped the fascia, laid the bricks, built and installed the roof. Much of the materials we used came from recycled and reclaimed sources, such as the 4 x 4’s which are set in the bricks; the bricks themselves, and the redwood moldings. We had a great time



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Comments 37 comments

We save cats 4 years ago

Great Hub Lucky Cats! The photos are excellent, and make it simple to visualize the process. You have such good taste, and are such a talanted woman, I swear you can do anything. There is an old saying that those who can, do; those who can't teach. You not only can do it, you are terrific at teaching others how to do it, as well. Keep em commin Kiddo!


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

Wow! thanks 'we save cats,' aka my best friend AL! You know we had a fantastic time doing this...and all the groundwork that you and I did prior to this on the house; astounding! Well, yes, I have to add...those who can..do and those who can't...try and, THEN, those who understand how to and could if they wanted to...TEACH!

Thank you, my dearest friend, Al...and, please, PLEASE, keep cool and stay out of that horrible heat~! Today, I see that SE Kansas is hitting close to 110...(as per my calculations, knowing that it is ALWAYS much hotter than the Weather Channel states!!!) and it is supposed to be even hotter in the next few days. give my furry sweet family big hugs...talk to you tonight!! Love you. Kathy


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa

Building a better building.... creating a comfortable home....

And doing this self with or without the help of friends - but oh, what can we possibly do self without the help of friends - is the most productive and pleasing social interactions. I remember when I was a child - when one of the members of our family wanted to do some improvements to their houses, all other members in the region turned up on a Saturday to do the work. Delicious meals and drinks were served - homemade ginger-ale for the kids - and it was like Christmas in the middle of the year....

How very-very important: First step....and, remember! Measure once, cut twice! Oh NO! I mean, MEASURE TWICE, CUT ONCE!

Lol! I can imagine the fun you've had with/during all your improvement-projects, Lucky Cats. Your sense of humor is truly so enjoyable :)

Voted up, awesome and inspiring :)


josh3418 profile image

josh3418 4 years ago from Pennsylvania

Lucky Cats,

Wow! The pictures were awesome! Looks like you had a lot of work on your hands but had fun doing it at the same time! And that you did by yourself with friends, very impressive.


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

My dear dear Martie...I was sharing this with you throughout so, I know you know (that I know that you know...LO) how much fun it was for me. Thank you for so much great support and friendship throughout so much! (and I'd like to thank my sponsors, my mother (rip) my brothers, my dog Fido and my cats....all two thousand of them!) anyway, I digress....Love ya' my friend; and you are so right about everything! Love your story of great enjoyment and friend/family love, too!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

I'm a journeyman carpenter, so this was an enjoyable read! Great work.


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

Hi WillStarr, I am honored. We just might be on the right track! Yea! Thank you so very much!


Conservative Lady profile image

Conservative Lady 4 years ago from Surprise Arizona - formerly resided in Washington State

Wow what a transformation - very well done! Thank you for sharing the journey.


A.A. Zavala profile image

A.A. Zavala 4 years ago from Texas

Mmm, smart aleck cat lady can build houses. I am completely pathetic.

I'm amazed by your skill, tenacity, and building prowess. I should be genetically predisposed to building things, spreading concrete, and landscaping. I cannot do those things either. Tonight I was replacing a light bulb in the garage and electrocuted myself. That fingernail will not grow back.

I think you should have a TV show on the TLC channel. You could rescue cats, and they can go and fetch tools and bring them to you while you work. Your theme song could be similiar to Charlies Angels. Instead it would be Charlie's Angel; I can hear the C.H.I.P.S. theme song also. Mmm, pondering...


Hyphenbird profile image

Hyphenbird 4 years ago from America-Broken But Still Beautiful

That transformation is amazing. I was enthralled with the process. It was like watching This Old House. Your home is just beautiful and even more so now. What a great project. You must have learned a lot while doing this also. Now show us the inside! Hyphen


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

oh Augustine! You always make me laugh!!!!! "tonight I was replacing a light bulb....and electrocuted myself. That fingernail will not grow back." Hahaha...well, Augustine, you're supposed to TURN OFF the switch, first!!! hahaha

Who's Charlie???? hmmmm...??

One thing I forgot to add to this article is...always have an EMT unit nearby! Sometimes, we were like the Two Stooges or Elmer Fudd and Gerald Ford all wrapped up in one, stumbling, finger hammering, staple gunning, tar covered, mortar splashed, bruised and bumbling comic series! The neighbors loved the daily show; they were all tuned in...no canned laughter here...! Haha

Honestly, I do love doing this kind of thing! Thank you for the always funny comments, Mr Augustine.


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

Dear Hyphenbird, I am so thrilled that you like this transformation...I do, too! I find such satisfaction seeing the "befores and afters." And yes, I learned much and hope to continue to do so. This house has been an ongoing project (delayed for the 5 years I lived in SE Kansas...), and I'm "not done yet!" You know what? I think I'll showcase the interior as a pictorial hub pretty soon...the B&E's of it. I'm happy you asked because I am very proud of what my best, of all people on earth, friend, Al and I worked our little fingers to the bone and really turned out a "sow's ear to silk purse" result....coming soon! Thank you , Hyphenbird!


Amy Becherer profile image

Amy Becherer 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO

When I owned a home, Kathy, I cannot tell you how many times the hired help botched the simpliest job, took forever to complete and charged an arm and a leg. All of my "gasts" are "flabbered" by, not only your expertise, but your ability to physically accomplish so much of the hard, heavy work.

You did a bang up job on describing the endeavor, complete with amazing photos. Your home, as I knew it would be, is gorgeous and will make my friend in N. Carolina soooo jealous, as it fits and surpasses the retro concept of her perfect dream home. I am so hoping you give us a tour of the interior when you complete it. Your innovative additions of the fabulous white wrought iron and the door you brought with you rivals any "This Old House" I've ever seen. Once again stands a magnificent masterpiece courtesy of Lucky Cats with a little help from her friends. Awesome, my artistic, architecturally amazing friend.


Maren Morgan M-T profile image

Maren Morgan M-T 4 years ago from Pennsylvania

WOW! You and I are soul sisters - re-creating a home is high on our list of important and enjoyable tasks. If your friends are bored, please ask them if they want to spend a little time with me in Pennsylvania. I have just taken on a 1940's bungalow in extreme fixer-upper distress. (I love it.)


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

Hi my dear friend Amy! We had so much fun working on this; it's something I've wanted to do for a very long time. I do know what you mean about the "hired help," Ha! Yes, well...I've been known to fire someone on the spot when it is evident they haven't acted w/regard to the design and using inferior materials...somethings just are NOT acceptable! (laughing over this; oh, the stories I could tell...once, I fired a contractor who was also a Lawyer..yikes! But, I was right and he did not challenge me ...there's more to this story but...no, not now! ) You are an incredibly wonderful and accomplished artist, Amy; I've seen some of your amazing paintings....so, I have NO doubt that you would create a beautiful home, too. It is such fun! & it requires an artist's eye and ability to imagine....which, w/no doubts...I KNOW you'd excel at; just as w/your stellar writing and insights. We are such a mutual admiration society...membership....2!! haha...Thank you SO MUCH for the wonderful comment, Amy...I am honored. Kathy


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 4 years ago from Stillwater, OK

From a former contractor, you did well. It is always best to repurpose, if you can, which is what I have always advocated. The last job that I had before I moved to OK, was overseeing a wood flooring job. By the time that 3/4 of it was done, the customers felt that they could handle the rest, as well as putting the quarterround back.


Amy Becherer profile image

Amy Becherer 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO

Kathy, you would love the "Restore" courtesy of Habitat for Humanity. They offer everything from soup to nut, at unbelievably lost cost, some of the materials brand new, but most taken from old homes for reuse to restore historic homes or for those that prefer the appeal of authentic vintage. They have a magnificent stock of hardware, doors, antique sinks, flooring, marble, wood, fencing...you name it. There motto used to be "Everything but the kitchen sink". Now it's "oh, we have that too."


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

Hello Maren Morgan M-T...so glad to hear it. We share this and our appreciation for our feline friends. I so love rebuilding/refurbishing our old structures....saving them is so important and, since this one isn't on the Historical Record; I was allowed leeway in my "improvements." Thank you for visiting and I hope you do a chronological progression of your work on the 1940's bungalow

Aviannovice....you could be writing about my friend Al and me....part of the floor in this home was destroyed beyond repair. We had taken off 3 layers of paint and, over that, black tarish glue w/"felt" stuck on it...and on top of that; linoleum.....well, I found the greatest place, Terra Mai, which is online; an outlet that sells reclaimed wood/flooring, etc. The great thing is that I was able to replace the damaged flooring w/stock from T M....and it was true to measurement....w/my existing floor. Now, after sanding and refinishing; it is not possible to see the difference. I love using bona fide materials from the right time period. We finished our floor, too...and I am very pleased that, "from a former contractor..." you think we "did well" Yes!!!! Thank you aviannovice!

My dear Amy....I love the information; I'll add it to my 'favorites.' Here, in N. Calif., just about 40 miles from my home, are several fantastic recycling/reclaimed materials outlets. Urban Ore and Omega. They are both huge warehouses stocked to the brim w/any and all items pulled from homes which have been "remodeled" (perish the thought!!) and the owners choose to throw out the original plumbing, windows, sinks, light fixtures, etc. it's like Christmas in July for me! I am like a kid in a candy store...and can, easily, spend an entire day perusing all the beautiful, unique and unusual, weird and amazing "artifacts," still useful, today. thank you so much for another great resource. I can imagine that I'll utilize all these great places, again; as, nothing can stop this crazy drive I have to bring the old Victorian beauties back to life. Your friend, with appreciation, Kathy


always exploring profile image

always exploring 4 years ago from Southern Illinois

I love this hub. There's nothing i like better than an old home remodeled. I did that then sold. I needed to downsize. Every time i pass it , i feel a loss. Your home is so beautiful. The best part, you were able to do the remodeling yourself with the help of your friend Richard. It looks completely different, and you saved a ton of money by using and recycling used parts. I tip my hat to you my friend. I loved all the pictures and the finished product..Peace and love Kathy..


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

Hi Ruby! Remember the hub I wrote about saying 'goodbye' to my 1885 home in SE Kansas? I ask because, I know how you feel, having put so much into a home...and then, you can no longer walk through the doors. I swear, I'll never give this one up...I loved this home from the moment I made that first offer, even though it was such an 'ugly duckling.' Yes, finding rare and old treasures to repair/replace orignal parts no longer working, is great great fun. Very cool! Well, thank you so much for the great comment and for relating to this adventure of mine...it is so satisfying to step back and see the changes. Appreciate your visit and comment. Kathy


A.A. Zavala profile image

A.A. Zavala 4 years ago from Texas

YOU SHOULD HAVE UPLOADED THE MISHAPS TO YOUTUBE. You could have been a Youtube Blooper millionaire. You could have been featured on the Today Show. From now on, film EVERYTHING. I can help you decide what is viable for monetization. It's like the ground is littered with Youtube nickles. Just need to pick them up.


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

Ahhh, Augustine! I am so honored that you shared this one...very complimented! Well, I have to admit, we really were fumbling and bumbling around. Mostly, we kept forgetting this tool or that one; "where are the screws?" "Did you see the hammer?" and so much more. I felt like I'd done 100 situps, one day, after having laughed so hard at our silliness. I should tell you that Al and I had thought of doing a do it yourself guide entitled something like "Home Improvement...What NOT to do!" because, believe me when I say....it has been a learning experience...replete w/just about every error (in judgement as well as in construction). Still, great fun and rewarding accomplishment. You are killing me w/humor, Augustine.. Nickles? Hey, I'm going for the gold...after all, it is the season!!! Thank you, Augustine. You are so cool for sharing this one. Kathy


BeyondMax profile image

BeyondMax 4 years ago from Sydney, Australia

Wow. Kathy, what a magical transformation! I admire your passion, really! How beautiful is the result, it's so impressive! Absolutely adore your way of home improvements, you made it look so easy with a smile (well, I know it's a lot of hard work) but you, guys, just one amazing crazy awesome team! Great job well done!


billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

Bravo my friend! Amy suggested I come over and read this and she was, of course, right on! You two did a remarkable job on that home of yours. Fantastic pictures and what a great project. Thank you for sharing this!


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

Greetings my dear BeyondMax and billybuc..well, I am very honored by your visit....this was a great exercise in 'home addition' (where WAS Tim the Toolman when we needed him??)...sometimes, during this project, we laughed ourselves into hysteria over so many 'forgets' and missteps....which is why I added the "get your ducks in a row" suggestion because, our ducks were ALL OVER THE PLACE and, nowhere in sight and, heading for warmer climes and hiding in the swamp grass! MIA and AWOL! haha....thank you for the visit and comments...love yas'!!


ChristyWrites profile image

ChristyWrites 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

Thanks for taking us along your journey at the renovation time. Your photos are great too. I will remember and repeat after you.. measure twice, cut once!


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

Hi ChristyWrites...I had SO much fun doing this little project! I truly love renovations and restorations...and demolition, too. I am so happy that you enjoyed this and, yes...measure twice, cut once! thank you for visiting.


girishpuri profile image

girishpuri 4 years ago from NCR , INDIA

very nice hub, your passion and it's so impressive, voted up.


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

Hi girishpuri! Very pleased that you liked this hub...we had great fun building this. thank you.


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA

Well I simply loved this Kathy. Gosh, you work so hard. Makes me tired looking at the great photos. Thank you for sharing this journey with us.


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

We had so much fun doing this, Sharyn...lots of laughs and the neighborhood had quite a show! Appreciate your visit & comment! Thank You


Lord De Cross profile image

Lord De Cross 4 years ago

What wonderful sharade of pictures that amaze me from the before, and then an after. That was a true epic work on a victorian home. The pics kept coming and putting together a film of its own. You did work hard on this one! Thanks for sharing Katie!


Made profile image

Made 4 years ago from Finland

Great hub! It's nice to see all the pictures that show how much work it really is. You have done a great job. Me and my spouse are building our house and you can't imagine how much work it is. We have been doing it for three years now. Your house looks amazing! :)


Sunnie Day 4 years ago

Morning Kathy,

You guys did a wonderful job! I love your Victorian home and the addition turned out perfect. I enjoyed the pictures, they were great. My husband and I have tackled many projects and I loved your rules of thumb, "Measure TWICE, cut ONCE! " I used to hear that in my sleep and even after measuring twice, I can hear my better half saying..I know I measured that right so what the ????.hehe

Thanks for sharing your renovation project!

Take care,

Love

Sunnie


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

Dear Lord, Sunnie and Made...I sincerely appreciate your kind comments...Yes; we had a great time on this project. Lord...I am very humbled that you shared this hub; I thank you!!


bobby giffin 2 years ago

Kathy this is beautiful. Did not know you could do this. Is the house in Napa? Are you living there now? The paint colors are great. I love Gingerbread too. This is my 5th house it is adobe and round here in N Florida built 1953. I am so proud of your santuarys for cats. I love them too. My email dolliebob99@aol.com your ole Hippy friend from Berkeley love you much Bobby email me


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 2 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California Author

So glad we've reconnected after so long...loved talking yesterday..so much to share. WE could talk for 5 days straight and not get it all in.

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