Cold Winter Days and the Warmth of a Wood Heater

This is like the wood heater we had in our home in the mill village during the 1950's.
This is like the wood heater we had in our home in the mill village during the 1950's.
A Fisher wood heater.
A Fisher wood heater.
Buck Stove
Buck Stove

Warming the House

My old friend and former Pastor, Reverend General Beddingfield once told a story about a man who had gone to sleep during his morning sermon and was called upon to dismiss in prayer. The wife sitting beside him elbowed her husband to rouse him from his sleep and he awakened with a start and a comment,"Ethel, it's your time to get up and stoke the heater!"

It is January 3 and old man winter is making his first real appearance here in Western North Carolina with temperatures that are down right cold with wind chills that are sub-zero. In the western most part of our state, snow has already fallen at least on a couple of occasions. Many folks still use wood to heat their homes or have wood heat as a backup for their heat pumps. In the early morning hours smoke can be seen billowing from chimneys and the smell of hard woods like oak and hickory burning are a reminder of how it was when I was a boy.

In those days wood was the main source for providing heat for our homes. After school chores included filling the wood box and making sure there was kindling to help start a fire in the wood cook stove come morning. Kindling would often be pine knots that had been split (very hard wood) but they would burn easily. Corn cobs were also used. Mama was the first to get up and she would start a fire in her cook stove and cook our breakfast Hot water to wash our face and hands was heated on the living room heater. There was always a pot of water on the living room heater to keep humidity in the air.

We learned how to use an ax for chopping wood and the wood my daddy bought was delivered in blocks about sixteen inches long to fit our wood heater.Most always a whole tree would be delivered at once and dumped in our back yard near the wood pile.It all had to be split and stacked. Splitting the wood, usually red oak or hickory was not an easy job and sometimes required the use of an iron wedge and sledgehammer. The hammer weight of sixteen pounds took some muscles and stamina to use and the biceps on our arms grew hard swinging that hammer and stacking wood. We did body building and didn't even know it!

Our labor was rewarded by the heat from the wood we had split. With the wood box full and the heater stoked, the cold winter nights would be cozy and comfortable. Wood stoves and heaters have transitioned much in recent years but the basic fire box is virtually the same. Fire brick have been added inside to many wood heaters and with variable speed electric blower attachments heat can be distributed over more floor space allowing maximum use of the firewood to be realized. If the home has ceiling fans,even more heat efficiency from the wood heat is advantageous and multiple rooms throughout the home is made possible. This was not so during the 1950s when only one room could be heated. As a boy I remember snuggling up close to the living room heater and getting good and warm before dashing off to our cold bedroom and diving under all those quilts and blankets mama put on our bed during the winter and the dread of jumping out of bed on a frosty morn and hurrying to the living room to get warmed up before breakfast.

For the enterprising who have access to plenty of wood, wood furnaces in a basement can be a huge asset to reduce home heating costs. Water can be heated and heat directed through the duct work of other home heating systems. I have a friend who built a wood furnace on the outside of his home, a rustic two story cabin and the furnace held a huge amount of wood which he loaded only once or twice a week depending on the outside temperatures.

I still like wood heat and there is nothing like a fire in the fireplace to give a home a touch of nostalgia and romance. We never gave it much thought when we were kids, it was just a way of life and we had contributed to the comfort of our home getting in the wood. Modern day wood splitting machines powered by gasoline motors and hydraulic cylinders have taken much of the back breaking work out of getting in winter supply of wood but still not an easy job. A good supply of wood can be split in a short period of time. A wood heater sure comes in handy during an ice storm when electricity has been interrupted for several days.

More by this Author


Comments 11 comments

mollymeadows profile image

mollymeadows 4 years ago from The Shire

Boy this takes me back. The thing I remember most about my grandparent's home as child was that both of them were always sitting in the kitchen in front of a black, cast-iron, wood-burning stove. The kitchen was always toasty and the fragrance of woodsmoke filled the air outside. To this day, the scent of woodsmoke takes me there. Thanks for a fun reminder.


Fiddleman profile image

Fiddleman 4 years ago from Zirconia, North Carolina Author

Thank you Molly for being the first to read and comment. The scent of wood burning also brings back precious memories.


Dean 4 years ago

I remembe some of this after our parents moved to N.C.

But you can have the good old

days. All I remember is cold feet and across cut saw.and a back ache.But the food was great cooked on a wood stove.

My Mom was a great cook.


Fiddleman profile image

Fiddleman 4 years ago from Zirconia, North Carolina Author

The good old days my friend make us appreciate life now. There is nothing to compare to a good hot biscuit made in a wood cook stove oven.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida

I grew up in a house with a wood stove in the kitchen next to the electric stove. We cooked some foods on it but mainly it was for heating. In our living room we had a coal stove which heated our home for years. When I was about 15 we got central heat and air so the coal stove left.

Thanks for sharing this with us. You are so right...those biscuits my Daddy made on the wood stove were so good that I can still taste them today. Sending Angels your way. :) ps


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida

I grew up in a house with a wood stove in the kitchen next to the electric stove. We cooked some foods on it but mainly it was for heating. In our living room we had a coal stove which heated our home for years. When I was about 15 we got central heat and air so the coal stove left.

Thanks for sharing this with us. You are so right...those biscuits my Daddy made on the wood stove were so good that I can still taste them today. Sending Angels your way. :) ps


Fiddleman profile image

Fiddleman 4 years ago from Zirconia, North Carolina Author

Thanks ps for visiting and commenting. We lived in a 4 room house and for most of my life wood was used. When I was a tween, mama got an electric range and daddy did some remodeling to the old mill village house he had purchased when the cotton mill sold all of their house. He bought a Seigler oil heater and we used kerosene to heat the house. The old house was still cold in the bedrooms but with the new fixtures life was still good. We never had an inside toilet during my 18 years living at home.


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 4 years ago

When we lived in the midwest, we had a wood stove in the basement and it did make a big difference, as you indicated here on the hub. I love to smell the wood burning and it is a nice cozy spot to read a book.


Fiddleman profile image

Fiddleman 4 years ago from Zirconia, North Carolina Author

Yes Yes, thank you for stopping by to read and for your comment.


David everette 2 years ago

Remember those little pig pen's daddy showed and required us to build. Made the stove wood season or dry out faster !


Fiddleman profile image

Fiddleman 2 years ago from Zirconia, North Carolina Author

I sure do remember.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working