Homegrown Piping Hot Peppers

Peppery Peppers

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Peppers

Pepper gardens are good for a beginning gardener because peppers can be grown relatively easy in a little bit of good potting soil. They can be grown in the ground or in a pot. They are a third of the "holy trinity" according to our Louisiana neighbors, along with celery and onions, which is the very beginning of the awesomeness of gumbo. Peppers can be used in a large variety of dishes including; chili, gumbo, pasta sauce, peppers and eggs, hot pepper jelly, Mexican dishes, etc. You get the idea. Not only can your garden be productive, you can also make it aesthetically pleasing. You can plant bell peppers in a variety of colors and other pepper varieties of different degrees of heat. My pepper plants produced a very good crop this past summer and this spring I will be reworking the garden to include more varieties. Even though they have become dormant, with the right care, they should come right back.

The sweetest peppers are those that are left on the vine until they turn red. Even jalapenos can ripen to red. Be sure to watch them carefully because they can ripen from red to rotten very quickly.

First, you must prepare your plot. To do this, stake out the amount of land you want to use and begin by turning the soil and cleaning it of weeds, rocks, foreign materials, etc. I recommend a 10' x 3' plot because it is large enough for a nice variety of peppers and small enough so that a beginner can handle it.

Once your ground is ready, mix in a good potting soil to give your plants a head start. Water lightly to make the soil easy to handle. Then begin planting your pepper plants about every 12 or so inches. Mix and match green, yellow and red bell peppers with chili, jalapeno, banana, and even habanero peppers if you are adventurous.

Once your peppers are planted, water them thoroughly every day at the same time. Pepper plants grow quickly and produce even more quickly. Never water in the heat of the day; the sun could burn your plants.

  • Use fertilizer for healthier plants.
  • Make sure to keep an eye on your plants to ward off pests.


You Will Need

  • 10' x 3' plot of land (prepared)
  • bell pepper plants
  • jalapeno pepper plants
  • banana pepper plants (hot and sweet)
  • assorted gardening tools

My favorite way to prepare the excess peppers is to clean them and put them in a bottle of brine. I usually use pepper juice from a bottle of Greek peppers. It is mild enough so that it does not add any heat to your peppers and it has enough vinegar to keep the peppers for a long time.

Red Hot Peppers

Happy Gardening

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I Like Peppers

As I said before, I like peppers of all kinds. Some of my favorite peppers are the "Red Hot Chili Peppers" and by that I mean the band. While it is true that you cannot grow these at home, it is worth going out and looking for them.

© 2010 Mary Krenz

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Comments 9 comments

sheila b. profile image

sheila b. 6 years ago

I buy a pepper relish that's so good on hamburgers. That's another way to use your peppers.


janiek13 profile image

janiek13 6 years ago from Florida's Space Coast Author

Yes, I believe I would like that. Great idea!


carolina muscle profile image

carolina muscle 6 years ago from Charlotte, North Carolina

I'm gonna try pepper jelly one of these days....


janiek13 profile image

janiek13 6 years ago from Florida's Space Coast Author

If you tried jalapeno pepper jelly and cream cheese on a cracker, you would love it!


nancy_30 profile image

nancy_30 6 years ago from Georgia

Great hub about peppers. I love growing bell peppers. I usually use them in my meatloaf.


janiek13 profile image

janiek13 6 years ago from Florida's Space Coast Author

Thank you, I do too. I hope that my garden grows well this spring.


Springboard profile image

Springboard 6 years ago from Wisconsin

If there's one thing I love, it's got to be bell peppers. For a while I've been contemplating growing them myself, mainly because they're so darned expensive in the store as well, and so unless they are on sale I don't usually buy them.

Since spring is here, and the pots and beds are empty, this might be a good year to give it a go. :)


janiek13 profile image

janiek13 6 years ago from Florida's Space Coast Author

Give it a try, they taste so much better from your own garden.


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

Thank you for the great hub. Growing peppers is a gift!

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