Decorating the Nursery with Animal Posters: Tiger

Tiger Kung Fu

Admittedly, I prefer tigers to lions. They are solitary hunters who depend solely on themselves, have much prettier coats and don't give a damn about anything. They also look more like cats, and walk around slowly and lazily, similarly to our small favorites. Tigers, unlike lions, aren't great runners - they rely on stalking and jumping skills, and can appear somewhat clumsy at the first glance. Kipling's tiger doesn't give justice to the animal, exhibiting only greed and stupidity; they are much more cautious and smarter cats. Plus, tigers have a kung fu style named after them. And that goes a long way.

Tough Choices

Like with most predators, the cubs look cute and helpless, but transform into fearsome predators with time. I suppose the same process applies to humans (though not all humans). Choosing a tiger poster is probably as difficult as picking a lion for an imaginary animal companion - both imply aloofness and independence that few children display or act upon. It's even more difficult, however, to imagine tigers living in groups in the jungle. A child who likes tigers makes a natural choice that suits it most.

Respect the Tiger

Jungle animals, tigers can climb on trees and surprise prey from there. In a way, they have the vertical form of movement at their disposal, in addition to the horizontal one, they have some bird features too. But tigers' most striking feature must be their fur coats, with bright contrasting orange and black (like giraffes) stripes that conceal them from potential targets, ensuring successful hunting. Tigers are masters of adaptation and can be found in both the hottest and the coldest climates (where they change the coat color to blue and black, which goes better with snow). In some tribes north of china tigers are actually considered holy animals that mustn't be disturbed in order to keep the demons at bay...

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