Front Yard Garden Beds Combining Vegetables & Flowers

Flowers, Veggies, and a Lot of Fun

Broccoli, and behind it, one cherry tomato plant, with daisies, hosta and daylilies in our front side garden.
Broccoli, and behind it, one cherry tomato plant, with daisies, hosta and daylilies in our front side garden. | Source
Broccoli amidst gaillardia and sedum around a front yard patio.
Broccoli amidst gaillardia and sedum around a front yard patio. | Source

Short recap

No reason exists to segregate flowers and vegetables for aesthetic sensibility. Vegetables frequently flower; flowers often bear fruit. All have leaves. Discounting the few species which thwart each other if they stand hip-to-hip in the garden plot, the plants I grow in my front yard constitute a gorgeous and peaceable kingdom.

While a veteran of flower nurturing, I am a newbie at growing potatoes, broccoli, corn. Undaunted, I immersed myself in suburban victory/recession gardening this year. We are a family of two humans and three cats, so modest vegetable yields will suffice.

I did resort to using low fences and 2-foot tall chicken wire in spots to make the bunnies work harder if they want to raid. The problem with our rabbits is that they do not know how to share. They eat it all. So far (knock on wood), neighbors have not objected. I like to think my arrangements are tasteful or so surprisingly creative that they can be discounted as yard art by the crazy cat lady.

End of July Progress Report for My Garden

The big success story is the broccoli. Artistically, the grayish-blue tinge of broccoli leaves provides a nice color contrast with my daisies and gaillardia. Equally important, it is so easy to grow! I am delighted to walk outside to harvest my front yard broccoli for salad. Sometimes I also add mint leaves and bee balm leaves from our gardens for unusual flavor accents.

Bee balm (monarda).
Bee balm (monarda). | Source

Peas, Carrots, Tomatoes

Regarding some of our other crops: our sugar snap peas came in earlier and I enjoyed them. However, the carrots continue to mock me. Every few years I try to grow them and they are reliably tasteless, no matter what variety of seed I buy. Since they do not contribute to my meals, I resent all time they take to mature and all the greenery they put out. I will probably abandon them for another several years. At the other end of the spectrum, my cherry tomatoes are consistently great. Usually, I have no will power to carry them in to the house: I just gobble all the ripe ones as a snack every day as I make my garden rounds. (I have only one plant, because I am the only tomato eater here.)

Look at these miserable little carrots.  And they are some of my best ones.
Look at these miserable little carrots. And they are some of my best ones. | Source

The Drought and Heat Wave

In our yard (which is the place that matters) as of the end of July, we have not had rain for 4 solid weeks. That is very unusual for our area and very challenging for the plants. I try to use prudence and good judgment about watering sparingly. Since the gardens combine food for the soul and food for the body, I will not desert my plants and abandon them to find moisture for themselves (even if that might be the ecologically correct stance.).

First, you stroll past hybrid lilies and daylilies.
First, you stroll past hybrid lilies and daylilies. | Source
Then you come upon the plot for bean plants in front of lovely yarrow.
Then you come upon the plot for bean plants in front of lovely yarrow. | Source
Another view of the area among the front rack garden island for beans.
Another view of the area among the front rack garden island for beans. | Source
Continue past a butterfly bush to find a plot for beans, sunflowers, and corn.
Continue past a butterfly bush to find a plot for beans, sunflowers, and corn. | Source

Neither Plants nor People Do Well in 106 Degree Heat

I had been totally frustrated with my lethargy this past week – even walking to and from the car felt like I was being scorched and crushed on the surface of Mercury. I blamed aging, and was not at all happy that my tolerance of summer heat was not matching my earlier years. Gardening renews my soul, yet I was depleted of energy. Then, I learned that the temperature here had reached 106 degrees Fahrenheit ( 41 degrees Celsius.) Well, no wonder I was “under the weather!” We have had many consecutive days over 100 degrees F, yet our normal temperature for this time of year is 85 degrees. I don’t know how my son in Minnesota handles all the temperature swings that they have!

This heat wave and drought irrefutably explains the reaction of my potato plants. I admit I got them out too late in the season. The few plants mixed among bushes, therefore sitting in partial shade, are limping along. Unfortunately, the patch in total sunlight gave up and died on the 106 degree day. All color drained from the leaves within hours. They looked as if someone had focused twelve hair blowers on each of the, and that BUNNICULA finished them off. * (See below.)

These potato plants are in partial shade, and I water them.  I had hoped they'd hang in there for a few more weeks.
These potato plants are in partial shade, and I water them. I had hoped they'd hang in there for a few more weeks. | Source
The potato crop I was forced to harvest after 106 degree F full sunlight wiped out the plants above ground.
The potato crop I was forced to harvest after 106 degree F full sunlight wiped out the plants above ground. | Source
Daylilies, dead nettle, the empty area from harvested potatoes and fenced in corn.
Daylilies, dead nettle, the empty area from harvested potatoes and fenced in corn. | Source
This side yard garden gets full sunlight.
This side yard garden gets full sunlight. | Source

Crops waiting for harvest are beans and corn. My short-maturity-period corn loves the heat as long as I water it (which I do.) The beans need to withstand the bunny nibbling, but their spade-shaped leaves are a lovely accent against the long ,thin spikes of daylily leaves.

Corn in containers on the deck. How cool is this?
Corn in containers on the deck. How cool is this? | Source
Corn to the left - leaves are visible - and marigolds in the front street plot.
Corn to the left - leaves are visible - and marigolds in the front street plot. | Source

Hopes, plans…..

Since it is a hoot to eat food from our kitchen garden, that will continue. I would like to learn how to freeze veggies for the winter. I won’t bite off more than I can learn in a season, thus other food preservation skills will need to wait for future years. The Oak Park, Michigan anti-vegetable ordinance is SO senseless. Veggies and flowers can live together and look fabulous!

What is in your garden?

If you are gardening this summer, please describe your plantings:

  • I grow only flowers.
  • I grow only vegetables.
  • I grow both flowers and veggies, but I keep them separated.
  • I grow both flowers and veggies, all mixed together in the same plot.
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Another view of broccoli plant between flowers. It works for me.
Another view of broccoli plant between flowers. It works for me. | Source

A Rabbit with Vampire Habits

BUNNICULA explained

* Bunnicula is a children's book (about grade 2 level for reading aloud to your child) which is farcical and silly. The rabbit drains the juices from vegetables, similar to a vampire drinking somebody's blood.

Text and photos copyright 2011 Maren Morgan

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