Glacier Bay Dual Flush Toilet Blue Button; What's it For? Which Button is Which?

Do you have a Glacier Bay Dual Flush toilet? Are you wondering which button is which? The instruction manual isn't exactly very clear; let me show you what's what!
Do you have a Glacier Bay Dual Flush toilet? Are you wondering which button is which? The instruction manual isn't exactly very clear; let me show you what's what! | Source

Are you going crazy trying to figure out which button is which on your new Glacier Bay dual flush toilet? Let me help you. I had this problem too, and after a whole year of using the buttons the wrong way, I finally figured out how to test it to know for sure which button was which.

When we bought our house we installed a brand new dual flush toilet as part of our bathroom renovation. I was so happy with it that I wrote an article extolling the water-saving benefits of the dual flush toilet in general and a sort-of Glacier Bay dual flush toilet review. To this day, the most common search phrase that brings people to that article is "Glacier Bay dual flush toilet blue button" and the second most common is "Glacier Bay dual flush toilet which button is which?"

First of all, I'm glad I wasn't the only one standing there scratching my head trying to figure this out. But more importantly, I can actually share what I learned to help people find the answers that I had such a hard time finding myself!

Glacier Bay dual flush toilet button questions? The blue button is for pee, and the big button is for poo.
Glacier Bay dual flush toilet button questions? The blue button is for pee, and the big button is for poo. | Source

Which Button IS which??

Despite spending a good deal of time reading the instruction manual, I ended up having to make an educated guess about which button was which. It didn't seem to make sense that the smaller flush would be the one that depressed both of the buttons, but since the manual was so poorly written, I assumed it was a bad translation and that couldn't possibly be right.

Well, it turns out that IS right. Oops. The smaller blue button is for the smaller flush (liquids), and the larger button is for the larger flush (solids). It certainly still confuses me that pressing the small button pushes down both buttons, and I still to this day cannot figure out the inner workings of the flushing mechanism that explains why that is...but my mind is at ease at least now that I know which button is which.

And yes, I actually did use a label maker to label the buttons on the toilet. After using the wrong buttons for a year, it was almost impossible to remember to switch. It also helps guests to avoid the awkward shouting from the bathroom, "Hey, which button do I use??" and it often gets a little giggle too.

How DO you know for sure which button is which?

I now know for sure that the small button is for liquids and the big button is for solids.

It kept bothering me that I didn't understand the way it worked and wasn't sure we were using the buttons correctly. I scoured the internet looking for an answer, and I found just as many people say it was one way as the other. Finally, someone suggested to me to measure the water in the tank! Genius! Brilliant!

I did exactly that. I took the lid off the tank and then turned off the water supply so the tank couldn't refill after flushing. I marked the level of the water with a sharpie, then flushed with the blue button. I used a quart sized measuring cup to refill the tank, keeping count of how many jugs of water it took to get the water back up to the line. I then did the same with the larger button. It turns out I hadn't set the flushing levels correctly anyway and that both buttons were using the same amount of water, 1.5 gallons per flush. Doh!

I adjusted the flush level for the left side, and performed this experiment again. Eureka! My small blue button flush now only uses 1.1 gallons per flush!

Keep reading if you'd like to learn more about Glacier Bay dual flush toilet adjustment!

The mechanism inside the tank of a Glacier bay dual-flush toilet shows a tiny half moon symbol on the blue side and a whole circle on the white side, signifying a half flush (blue) and a whole flush (white).
The mechanism inside the tank of a Glacier bay dual-flush toilet shows a tiny half moon symbol on the blue side and a whole circle on the white side, signifying a half flush (blue) and a whole flush (white). | Source

Glacier Bay Toilets Dual Flush Adjustment

Adjusting the flush levels for the Glacier Bay dual flush toilet isn't too difficult, but there is a slight inconvenience. The adjustment markers are at the bottom of the mechanism and facing the sides of the tank, and to be able to read them at all you would have to look right through the porcelain. Since X-ray vision is unfortunately not one of my many superpowers, I used a flashlight and a mirror to help me see better inside the tank.

Sure enough, on the blue side down at the bottom it says "Half" and on the white side it says "Full". (Two pretty big clues also would have been the half circle shape on the blue side and the full circle on the white side, but I must have missed those before. Awesome.)

To decrease the volume of the flush, move the sliding button UP. So for the left (blue) side, which is the smaller flush, all the way to the top would be using the least amount of water (about 1.1 gallons) per flush. I suggest for the right (white) side, which is the larger flush, you try it somewhere in the middle and you can always move it down later if you want to use more water. Sliding the button all the way to the bottom will use the most amount of water, about 1.6 gallons per flush.

Read more about the water-saving benefits of a dual flush toilet!
Read more about the water-saving benefits of a dual flush toilet! | Source

More about the Glacier Bay Dual Flush Toilet

Chances are, if you're here, you've already got yourself a fancy Glacier Bay Dual Flush Toilet, and I congratulate you for that! You're saving yourself a lot of water every year, which is no small feat and every bit of conservation of one of our most precious and quickly dwindling resources counts!

Click this link if you'd like to read more about the water saving benefits of the Dual Flush Toilet to see how the numbers add up with every flush!

More on Water Conservation

Did you know you can water your yard with recycled water from your washing machine? Click the link to read my article on grey water and the do's and don'ts of recycling water.

Thanks so much for reading! I hope you got some questions answered here today and are a little bit more informed about which button is which for your Glacier Bay dual flush toilet!

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Comments 3 comments

Marcy Goodfleisch profile image

Marcy Goodfleisch 3 years ago from Planet Earth

Hey - I really needed this guide to green potties! I installed one in the the main bathroom, and now I wish I had them in the other bathrooms (coming soon, to a lavatory near you!). But the darned thing doesn't tell you which is which. I think I can figure it out now - fun hub, and I love your labels on the photos! Voted up and up.


P3 3 years ago

Great article. It appears that I identified the buttons correctly early on, but that doesn't keep me from second-guessing myself periodically.

New models have two equal-sized silver buttons in silver. Left button has one drop embossed on it, the right button has two drops embossed on it. Simple change, but a great improvement in clarity.


jezebellamina profile image

jezebellamina 3 years ago from Dallas, TX Author

Thank you! Glad to hear they have made some changes - that makes a whole lot more sense and probably will help people avoid that post-potty perplexity :)

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