How To Grow 10 Healthy Salad Greens!

First glance at that title I can hear the groans from far and wide “…not another article on how healthy greens are ” However it needs to be said over and over again, needs to be shouted from the roof tops until all realize that adding some or all of the ’World of Greens’ into our daily diet regularly is one of the most vital things we can do for our health... Greens are a necessary food source for human health. They provide the essential alkaline minerals, such as calcium and magnesium and are also rich in potassium, iron and zinc.



These important to our health greens are easy to grow and can taste great too, either eaten raw, in salads or cooked, baked, braised, stuffed etc. Prepared by any recipe possible these greens will benefit the body.

Arugula:

The name alone of these dark green leaves is enough to want to make me want to eat them as far as I’m concerned (try saying it a couple of times, it rolls off the tongue just so well). The taste of Arugula has a bit of a sharp and peppery bite to it. You can have it raw as a salad on its own with a mild spritzer type dressing or add some to a tossed salad for an extra spicy flavour. It is also super in soup or my favorite, chicken stir-fry.

All About Arugula:

Arugula is also known as Rocket salad or Roquette. It belongs to the cabbage and the mustard family. As I said already Arugula has a pleasant zesty and slightly bitter flavor that will add a delicious punch to any salad.

It is a hardy cool weather crop which unfortunately can bolt and become really bitter once the weather warms up. Most good garden center will have the seeds in stock. I like to sow the seed directly into the garden once the soil is workable. When planting cover the seeds with a thin layer of soil. Remember to gently mist the soil regularly while the seed is germinating. The rows should be at least 5” apart and the seedlings also need to be thinned out to about 5” apart once the seeds have sprouted. Arugula has a shallow rooting system so the best way for thinning is to carefully snip the extra sproutlets with sharp scissors. (The cut sections can be left to rot and reenter the extra nutrition to the soil.) Arugula can also be started indoors but the plantlets then need to be acclimatized  and can only go outside once all the danger of frost has passed.

Along with the rest of the lettuce in your garden you can replant every week in August, which will then produce tender leaflets during September and October all the way till the first fall frost.The Arugula growing season can also be extended in a cold frame for quite a few weeks longer. A few years ago I added the last Arugula plants to our Christmas dinner salad.

You should plant Arugula in a partially shaded and wind protected area to keep it cooler longer.  that should extend its production into the hot summer months. It requires no more then 10 hours of full sunlight. Once the leaves are about 5” long snipp off the bottom outside leaves. Snip only every other leaf which leaves room for the others to grow.

Tip: I grow Arugula with all my other greens such as spinach, lettuce, dandy-lion greens, and mustard so I can harvest a super-duper bowl of fresh salad all in one spot.

Mustard greens:

These vivid dark green leaves have a… surprise, surprise, sharp mustardy flavor that can be eaten raw in a salad or slightly sauteed in olive oil. It looses a bit of it's piquant flavor when cooked but still delish. Awesome when finely shredded as a slaw and it's peppery flavor goes really well with pulled beef or pork. (Great grower in the garden without chemical fertilizers.)

Mustard is a cool-season leaf crop that grows especially well in cool climates, actually preferres it and has the best flavor if harvested before the daytime temps reach 75-78F on a regular basis. The plant can reach 3 to 3.5 feet tall. The leaves, stalk and seeds are used.

Companion plants are peas. Mustard is a sociable plant that minds his own business and gets along with one and all.

All will love the taste so plant 6-8 plants per family members. Mustard can be started indoors 6 weeks before the last frost and transplanted into the garden early as long as the plant-lets are about 3-4 inches tall. Sow succession of crops every 10 days 1/2" deep directly into the garden to have a continuous harvest once the soil reaches 40-42F which is the ideal temp for it to germinate. Plant again in mid summer directly into the garden in an area that has a bit of shade to keep it cooler. Mustard loves soil with a pH level of 5.4 to 6.5. Add some well aged compost and it will thrive in chemical free settings. Place plants at least 6 inches apart.




Radicchio:

Technically this green is not green at all but a bright reddish purple. It is crunchy with a distinct slightly bitter taste. It grows in small tight baseball sized heads. Radicchio is one of the major ingredient in mescalin (baby green leaf) salads. Radicchio, chicory and Belgian endive are all the same plant just different varieties.

Radicchio is a hardy cool season perennial grown best early to take advantage of the cool. It needs about 80-85 days to mature depending on the variety planted. Cool growing temperatures that stay between 40 and 70F produce the best sweet tasting radicchio. Start seeds indoors and transplant into the garden as early as 3-4 weeks before the average date of the last frost in spring however it is also possible to sow seeds directly into the garden early. The radicchio roots do not like to be disturbed to much so if indoor planting is wanted use much cuplets where the whole thing can be planted outdoors. To keep the soil cool the longest deep mulch around the plantlets either using straw or even opaque plastic mulching sheets.

Companion plants of radicchio are all greens but it really doesn't like the legumes family. It doesn't have any serious disease or pest problems.

Sow seeds 1/4 inch deep and about 2 inches apart. Once the plantlets are about 4-5" tall start thinning them out to 6 inches apart. Remember to add the tender thinnings to your salad. (yum) Most children are not that fond of radicchio plant 6-8 plants per adult household members.

My favorite kind that grows just perfect in my neck of the woods (south western Ontario) is the 'Prima Rosa' 82 days and the 'Early Carmen' 75 days.


Spinach:

Another versatile green that has been popular for a long time and is said to have all the iron a body needs. (Popeye sure is proof of that, no doubt). Use raw in salads, sauteed, steamed, stir-fried, tossed in soup, stew, sauces and in a cottage cheese vegetarian lasagna (to die for). (A super easy addition in an organic garden.)

Spinach is a cool weather lover and grows well in cool climates, actually preferres it and the frost actually brings out the sweet taste of the spinach. It can tolerate temperatures to 20F but at the same time is more tolerant to heat then cabbage. At times the plants can grow with a crooked stem or top heavy which then may need stacking.

Companion plants are tomatoes and peppers and strawberries, but spinach has a feud on with corn and all legumes especially pole beans. Plant 20-22 plants per family members. Plant succession crops every 10 days. Start indoors 6 weeks before the last frost and transplant into the garden early even when some light frost can still be expected for a couple of weeks and as long as the plant-lets are about 3-4 inches tall. Plant again in mid summer directly into the garden in an area that can be easily sectioned off for a cold frame in late October or November. Spinach loves soil with a pH level of 6 to 6.8 with some well aged compost added in. It will thrive in chemical free settings.

The spinach leaves can be harvested regularly by cutting the 4 top most young tender leaves once the plants have 6 to 8 leaves. If all leaves are cut, trim the stem down to around 3" above the soil and it will have a chance to regrow some new leaves.


Butterhead or Bibb, Loose Leaf and Romaine Lettuce

Bibb and butterhead lettuce is found under either name. It is a salad green that has a nice delicate buttery mild flavor . Usually available at most grocery stores. Bibb lettuce comes in small roundish heads. Use it as a salad with a light dressing or on a sandwich sub. (Fairly easy to grow in an organic veggie garden)

Loose leaf lettuce either with green or reddish leaves it is excellent for salads. Sweet delicate and crisp usually the first thing out of my veggie garden in the spring. When harvesting carefully cut outside leaves only to preserve the core, which will keep producing new shoots or leaves continually. (This cool weather lover is very easy to grow without the uses of any chemicals)

Romaine lettuce is also a world famous salad. The large crunchy dark green leaves have a sweet strong flavor that is mostly famous for being the main ingredient of the Cesar salad. It is a great salad that can accompany just about every type of food possible. (Also when harvesting carefully cut only outer leaves of plant for regular use and it will keep growing and growing

All of these lettuce types are easy to grow and they are cool-season crops. They can be started indoors 7-8 weeks before the average last frost date of the spring. Once they're 3" tall transplant them into the garden then keep sowing seeds every 10 days for a continuous harvest until the heat of the summer. Then start again mid to end August for fall crops. If lettuce is protected with frost cloches or row covers at night it will happily keep producing salads after salads. I've successfully grown leaf lettuce in a cold frame until Christmas time even here in south western Ontario.

A family favorite so plant lots usually 8 to 10 heads or 6-7 feet of gardening plot per person is about right.

Grow lettuce in full sun or partial shade and start harvesting the tender young leaves after about 38-40 days. Cut it early mornings when it's still cool so that it won't wilt. Lettuce prefers soil with a pH level of 5.8 to 6.8. Thin leaf lettuce to be 4-6 inches apart and bib lettuce at least 10. If lettuce is crowded it will bolt and go to seed really fast.

Companion planting lettuce loves to grow and chat with onion, garlic, leek, carrots, radishes strawberries and cucumbers. It doesn't complain too much about other veggies either as it's a friendly little chap.

Lettuce doesn't have much of a disease problem but remember aphids, snails and slugs love it too. Spray aphids off with water and trap slugs by placing saucers filled with stale beer around the lettuce patch.

Parsley:

Possibly the most used green world wide. The most common parsley available in our grocery stores is the curly frilly leaved kind. Italian parsley has flat wider leaves. In some countries cilantro or coriander leaves are sold as parsley. It is used in salads, sauces, dressings. The clean flavor goes just as well with fish or meat. My favorite parsley salad is the middle eastern Tabbouleh (yum). (Very easy to grow in the garden.)

Parsley is one of the most popular herbs that are grown in English and Mediterranean herb gardens. Parsley can be used for flavouring or as a garnish. It is also a good source of nutrition and can be used for neutralising strong smelling breath (Garlic springs to mind). Although Parsley is a biennial herb it is normally grown as an annual.

Growing parsley requires more patience than other herbs as it has a long germination period - around 3 to 4 weeks. Germination of parsley requires warm temperatures so a warm room is advised rather than outside. Parsley can be moved outside if required and can be transplanted into containers or well dug soil. If growing outside then sow your plants indoors about 6 to 8 weeks before you plan to move them outside. Parsley will grow well in a soil that is pH 6.0- 7.0
A normal potting compost will be sufficient if growing it indoors. Ensure the soil does not dry out - water more frequently in summer. You can add a mulch to the soil to reduce soil moisture loss and reduce competing weeds.

Outside plants can be dug up and brought inside to extend their growing season or left in a cold frame.

You can harvest Parsley fresh - both the stalks and leaves can be eaten and you can store it easely by drying or freezing it. Cut the outermost stalks just above ground level. This will encourage further growth.

Both flat leaved parsley and curly leaved parsley varieties are available.

Kale:

This the curly and leafy dark green member of the cabbage family that is most often forgotten and ignored, unfortunately. Even though it is as versatile as it’s cabbage cousins. Kale can be sauteed, steamed, added to soups or stews and can also be eaten raw like a Cole slaw. It has a strong robust cabbage flavor that begs to be served with bacon or pork chops. (A cool weather crop, Kale will keep growing even in Canada in a cold frame till way into the late fall or early winter and doesn’t need chemical fertilizers.)

Kale is a non-heading biennial that is grown as an annual. It can grow 3 feet tall if planted in full sun. It grows well in cool climates, actually preferres it and the frost actually brings out the sweet taste of kale. It can tolerate temperatures to 20F but at the same time is more tolerant to heat then cabbage.

Companion plants beets, celery, potatoes, herbs, onion, garlic, leeks and shallots but kale does not like pole beans, strawberries and tomatoes. Plant 2-3 plants per family members. Kale can be started indoors 6 weeks before the last frost and transplanted into the garden early even when some light frost can still be expected for a couple of weeks and as long as the plant-lets are about 3-4 inches tall. Plant again in mid summer directly into the garden in an area that can be easily sectioned off for a cold frame in late October or November. Kale love soil with a pH level of 5.4 to 7.0 with some well aged compost added in. It will thrive in chemical free settings. Place plants at least 12 inches apart. Thin out to give the plant lots of room to expand but remember to transplant the ones taken out in a different spot in the garden.

Kale should be harvested regularly by cutting the young tender leaves from the bottom up once the plants is 10 to 12 inches tall. This will let the plant continue to grow.

Swiss Chard:

Swiss chard has a somewhat similar taste to beets and spinach and can also be prepared like spinach. The leaf color of Swiss chard is usually green but its stems come in many different colors, that's why it's also known as the rainbow vegetable. Swiss chard can be your best friend when cutting down on calories as one cup of fresh Swiss chard has only 35 calories. Sauteed it really pairs well with lamb or mutton. Can become an easy to make side dish sprinkled with bacon-bits (real or simulated), or the leaves can be used as tasty wraps for just about anything. (Another easy to grow plant that will last way into the cold season in a cold frame) Swiss chard is part of the beet family and is very high in vitamin A and K. Vitamin A is very beneficial for the eyes and Vitamin K is important for blood clotting, cell growth and may help with bone development. The benefits of the Swiss chard is actually quite a long list; it is high in vitamin A, C, and K, magnesium, manganese, potassium, and is a good source of iron, vitamin E, dietary fiber and copper, it's a great source of antioxidants it promotes lung and digestive health, helps prevent inflammation.. .

It can grow 15-16 inches tall if planted in full sun. It grows well in cool climates, actually preferres it and the frost actually brings out the sweet taste.

Companion plants are garlic, onions, leeks, shallots, mustard greens, and chicory but chards have a feud on with the tomato, potato, yams and legumes.

This will let the plant continue to grow. Plant 2-3 chard plants per family members. Chards can be started indoors 4 weeks before the last frost and transplanted into the garden once the plant-lets are about 3-4 inches tall. Once established in the garden it can tolerate the cold and heat. Plant again in mid summer directly into the garden in an area that can be easily sectioned off for a cold frame in late October or November. Collards love soil with a pH level of 6.0 to 6.7  with some well aged compost added in. It will thrive in chemical free settings. Place plants at least 8 inches apart. Add a compost tea twice during the growing season.

Chards can be harvested several times per season once the leaves are 3-4" by removing outside leaves from the bottom up. If all the leaves are harvested cut the stem back to 3-4" above the soil and it will regrow some more leaves. A few years back here in Canada I was able to over winter two plants in a cold frame and covered with straw for a second year growing season. I had some tender fresh leaves in the second week of April.

My favorite type is red chard called 'Ruby Red' and is one of the faster growing kind as it matures in about 55 to 58 days.



Collards

Collards are a cool-weather crop. They are a super hardy green that belongs to the cabbage family. The taste of the collards green is a cross between cabbage and kale however it doesn't smell as strong. This large leafed plant is fantastic with pork and beef dishes served as a finely shredded slaw or used in a stir fry. As a matter of fact every dish that uses cabbage, kale and Swiss chard can be replaced by collards.

Collards is a non-heading biennial that is grown as an annual with waxy leaves on sturdy stems. It can grow 3 feet tall if planted in full sun. It grows well in cool climates, actually preferres it and the frost actually brings out the sweet taste of collards. It can tolerate temperatures to 20F but at the same time is more tolerant to heat then cabbage. At times the plants can grow with a crooked stem or top heavy which then may need stacking.

Companion plants are tomatoes and peppers but collards have a feud on with the potato and yams. Plant 2-3 plants per family members. Collards can be started indoors 6 weeks before the last frost and transplanted into the garden early even when some light frost can still be expected for a couple of weeks and as long as the plant-lets are about 3-4 inches tall. Plant again in mid summer directly into the garden in an area that can be easily sectioned off for a cold frame in late October or November. Collards love soil with a pH level of 6 to 7.5 with some well aged compost added in. It will thrive in chemical free settings. Place plants at least 12 inches apart. Thin out to give the plant lots of room to expand but remember to transplant the ones taken out in a different spot in the garden.

Collards should be harvested regularly by cutting the young tender leaves from the bottom up once the plants is 10 to 12 inches tall. This will let the plant continue to grow.


Photos coutresy of sxc.hu, flickr, lebensmittelfotos.com

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Comments 62 comments

Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 5 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

dusy7969, thank you for taking a look and for commenting

regards Zsuzsy


dusy7969 profile image

dusy7969 5 years ago from San Diego, California

Great hub.I like this hub.Salad is very important for person.We should use the salad in daily diet.Salad provide the vitamins and make the man healthy.So thanks a lot for this informative and useful sharing.


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 6 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

SilverGenes, thank you for taking a look and for commenting. Kale is one of my fave greens too.

kindest regards Zsuzsy


SilverGenes 6 years ago

Great article on greens. Kale may be on the menu tonight now :)


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 6 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Thank you Al, how nice of you to stumble this hub. Even though the article is 10 months old, soon (in my neck of the woods) it might be of use again as the veggie growing season starts up again in the spring.

I'm getting antsy as I want to get out into the garden and start growing my favorite greens again.

hope you're well

kindest regards Zsuzsy


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 6 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

LilyRose, thanks for taking a look and for commenting.

I'd be interested in a new recipe for Kale salad. I'll be looking for your hub.

Kale is also really easy to grow especially as its not finicky and grows long into the cold season.

hope you're well kindest regards Zsuzsy


Mystique1957 profile image

Mystique1957 6 years ago from Caracas-Venezuela

Dear Zsuzsy...

I have a fancy for "unearthing" good ole hubs and bring them back to the active arena. I find this hub informative, provocative and healthy!

Nice, detailed instructions! I loved it!

Thumbs up and stumbled!

warmest regards and blessings,

Al


Lily Rose profile image

Lily Rose 7 years ago from East Coast

Great article - I agree that the message to eat more greens needs to be repeated. I've been thinking of planting my own Kale because there's a salad I make with it that I LOVE (oooh, Hub idea?) and every time I buy Kale at the market lately it's full of disgusting bugs; I've had to throw away three large unches of Kale in the last couple of months!


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

DrPastorCarlotta, thank you for taking a look and for commenting.

kindest regards Zsuzsy


drpastorcarlotta profile image

drpastorcarlotta 7 years ago from BREAKOUT MINISTRIES, INC. KC

VERY, VERY informational!!! I'm a green eater any! lol You go girl!


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Kirsten, this is my first year growing purple carrots. My friend brought me some organic seeds back from her Moms garden in BC. I also have pink cauliflower and black tomatoes we'll see how all of this works out.

Thanks for coming by and for commenting

regards Zsuzsy


kirstenblog profile image

kirstenblog 7 years ago from London UK

Right on sister! I love anything you can eat raw basically, would love if you added a post on growing carrots indoors (small flat with limited space). I love that carrots actually grow in more colors then just the store orange ones. That color was grown in preference to other colors to honor the royal family as that was the royal color in Holland. When I last visited my adopted mom she gave me some carrots out of her garden and they were purple! I couldn't believe my eyes. I actually went to my local organic shop here at home in the city and asked them why they didn't sell purple carrots, they let me leave it in the advice box and after a month or so they had rainbow carrots on the shelves. Purple ones are my favorite and I think they have a sweeter flavor.


ripplemaker profile image

ripplemaker 7 years ago from Cebu, Philippines

Life is treating me well Zsuzsy thanks! :-) I know of some people who hates greens and will not swallow any "leaves" so they say. Goodness! LOL


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Hi Michelle, I just love company so I'm glad you came over to take a look and commented. These greens are soooooo important to our health and its most unfortunate that many people do not know this or just ignore these proven facts.

Hope life is treating you well, greetings from Canada and kindest regards

Zsuzsy


ripplemaker profile image

ripplemaker 7 years ago from Cebu, Philippines

Hi ZsuzsyBee, you are right this has to be said over and over again. :-) I agree!!! The more we eat greens, the more healthy we become! Yoohhoo!!! Lovely healthy hub! Green thumbs up! :-)


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Rallenbrewster, thanks for taking a look and for commenting. These are just some of my favorite greens. I could easily put another hub or two together about healthy greens. Are you eating your greens?

kindest regards Zsuzsy


rallenbrewster profile image

rallenbrewster 7 years ago from USA

cleverlywritten and to be honest I had no idea there were so many different types of greens out there lol


\Brenda Scully 7 years ago

frogs are o.k. in the garden it is when they jump into hub pages they cause the trouble


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Brenda, thanks for taking a look and for commenting. I love my greens too especially when I can grow them chemical free in my garden.

I guess frogs have their uses too...bug control?

kindest regards Zsuzsy


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

BC, a Captain like you has to know the benefits of greens... vitamins and all... scurvy and all hahaha I just had an idea I will see if I can come up with a recipe for greens that are steeped in alcohol.... kale & vodka cocktail? Arugula & Gin martini on the rocks? Spinach & rye wallbanger?............that will make the green go down,  naturally all would have to be served shaken not stirred with an olive and those curly little straws....

Glad you came for a visit

regards Zsuzsy


\Brenda Scully 7 years ago

Lovely hub...... very well explained will visit this again, I love all things green, except frogs


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

RGraf, good for you. I had my first garden greens out of this years garden June 14 (I always mark the date when first planted and first harvested down in my gardening diary). Let me know how your garden's working out.

Always glad when you stop in for a visit

regards Zsuzsy


RGraf profile image

RGraf 7 years ago from Wisconsin

Thank you. I'm wanting to get some greens this year growing and this helped light the fire under me.


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Suzanne growing green without having to work at it is possibly the best scenario yet. Glad you came by for a visit.

regards Zsuzsy


justmesuzanne profile image

justmesuzanne 7 years ago from Texas

I never have any luck at all trying to grow anything on purpose in my yard! But I have wild poke, chicory, dandelions, and something else (?) that make great salads without my even trying! :D


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Prasetio30, thanks for taking a look and for commenting.

I never use chemical fertilizer in my garden. Everything thing I grow is organically grown. As far as I'm concerned that is the only way and reason to have a garden, to grow HEALTHY vegetables.

regards Zsuzsy


prasetio30 profile image

prasetio30 7 years ago from malang-indonesia

Nice information. Deep research to make kind of this hub. I just add better if planted organically, to avoid the dangerous chemicals.thanks for share!


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Hello Patty, how are you?

Arugula is one of my faves. I usually start my seed in the house then I move them outside but keep covering them at night.

When the fall hits I build a cold frame around the kale, chard, mustard greens and collard, usually they last till late December in my neck of the woods.

I'm always glad when you pop in for a visit. Take care.

Kindest regards Zsuzsy


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 7 years ago from North America

I have taken your suggestion and tried arugula for the firs ttiome and liked it very much. Mustard greens, my father always ate, so I will try some from the store before planting.

Do you ever use a cold frame to start these greens, or just straight into the ground? Thanks and thumbs up!


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Newsworthy! Kale is number 7 on my list of greens above. I love growing kale because it is one of those plants that I can keep growing way into the late, late fall in a cold frame.

Thanks for taking a look and for commenting.

regards Zsuzsy


newsworthy 7 years ago

Nice work on the greens ZBee. Im a mean green eating machine when it comes to greens. Have you tried kale and do you like it?

Nightline just aired two women who juice greens and other vegetables to make this 65 dollar a six pack detox juice. Did you hear about that? If not, thought id spread another good green story.


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Compu-smart, always glad when you come for a visit. How are you? I'm in the midst of getting my garden all set up right now. It's taken many years of trial and error to get to this point of knowing what to grow when and how but I'm glad to share.

Greetings from a beautiful springy Canada

kindest regards Zsuzsy


compu-smart profile image

compu-smart 7 years ago from London UK

Hi Zsuzsy Bee, your so smart! and I'm always learning so much from your hubs which are mostly about things i had no knowledge of, and growing my own foods, would be awesome as i just don't trust the consumer products at all which as we all know are sometimes imported from thousands of miles! and to pick fruit, veg and salad from my own garden (if i had one) would be, for me magical!


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Camping Dan! You need to check out the seeds as some can be heat tolerant than others. Lucky that during the heat of the summer we have all kinds of other veggies to fall back on.

Thanks for taking a look and for commenting

regards Zsuzsy


Camping Dan profile image

Camping Dan 7 years ago

Wow you did your research on this one! I love being able to head out into my garden to get a fresh salad. But I do not like how many of the salad greens do better in cooler temps. This means that by the peak of summer they are not doing well.


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Journey. Glad you came over for a visit. Collards is one of my faves too and I kill for a good Tabbouleh... Now that sounds like a good idea for supper. I haven't had it for a while and I think I have all the ingredients.

take care Zsuzsy


Journey * profile image

Journey * 7 years ago from USA

Hi Zsuzsy Bee, this is a great hub. Well put together and very informative. Thanks for sharing. The collards are probably my favorite. I love parsley for seasonings- Journey*


marisuewrites profile image

marisuewrites 7 years ago from USA

Thanks ZBee, I'll give it a try!! They are a constant battle...


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Which greens are those? I would like to know. Thanks for taking a look and for commenting. I have not had any problems with any of these greens described here as I'm on a couple of different medications myself.

kindest regards Zsuzsy


GiftedGrandma profile image

GiftedGrandma 7 years ago from USA

I love greens, but please remember that some medications effectiveness are reduced by eating certain greens. I have found this out in the past nine months from experience.


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Love the new avatar Sweetie and I'm sure your Mom doesn't mind sharing. However eating the veggies you've grown yourself you will be amazed have a 10 times better flavor.

Take care zs


SweetiePie profile image

SweetiePie 7 years ago from Southern California, USA

I am good, and your hub does inspire me to try growing salad greens in my backyard. My mom always grows these too, so I am guilty of taking hers.


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

SweetiePie! How are you? So glad when you pop by for a visit. I love my greens too and am just waiting impatiently for them to grow.

Kindest regards Zsuzsy


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

JamaGenee! Always glad when you come by for a visit. We always seem to forget just how important these greens are to our health.

Kindest regards Zsuzsy


SweetiePie profile image

SweetiePie 7 years ago from Southern California, USA

I love my greens, so this hub speaks to me.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 7 years ago from Central Oklahoma

Zsuzsy, your instructions for planting and such are lost on me since I have nowhere to put a garden. But now I'll know what the different greens in the supermarket *really* are and can choose accordingly. Thanks!


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Ivorwen I'm getting antsy too with wanting to get that garden all set. Always glad when you come for a visit.

kindest regards Zsuzsy


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

B.T. Glad to be of help. I can understand if a Jack-a-lope needs more then just butter tarts.

Hope you're well, Happy gardening

kindest regards Zsuzsy


Ivorwen profile image

Ivorwen 7 years ago from Hither and Yonder

As soon as it quits snowing, I will be planting! Volunteer spinach is making an appearance already, making me fidgety with the white stuff.


B.T. Evilpants profile image

B.T. Evilpants 7 years ago from Hell, MI

I do love greens! I really do need to get my garden back up and running. Thanks for this motivation, Zsuzsy!


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Peggy I can imagine that these green can become a challenge in your neck of the woods. You should check though there are some varieties of these greens that are more heat tolerant.

thanks for coming by for a visit.

regards Zsuzsy


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

CGull it bothers me to no-end when I think of how much damage is being done to our food from its deepest core up.

That's why I keep expanding on my veggie garden.

regards Zsuzsy


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Marisue unfortunately those buggers are hard to kill. My Gramps used to say that the younger they are the easier they're to get rid of. He used to make a 'rhubarb leaf soup' by boiling the leafs for a few minutes and letting it steep then he sprayed the plants with the stuff for a couple of days. That seemed to help. I didn't have rhubarb for a few years so my defense was to place a board near the plants in the evening then early morning they were all under there having their siesta which I interrupted by squashing them...

CAUTION: rhubarb leaf soup is poison-us. It will however lose its potensy after a while when it dries. So if spraying plants and squash wait until after you're done harvesting for the day and wash squash well.

hope this helps zs


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

NolimitsNana thanks for coming by and for commenting.

kindest regards Zsuzsy


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 7 years ago from Houston, Texas

Yum! I grew many of these up in Wisconsin and had great luck. Trying some now in Houston although the heat may not be as friendly for growing some of these. Crossing my fingers!


cgull8m profile image

cgull8m 7 years ago from North Carolina

Great Hub Zsuzy, I would love to grow them. I agree with Bob, it is sad many are obsesses with fast foods and then later complain about health. "What we sow, we reap" it is true in gardening and in what we eat also.


marisuewrites profile image

marisuewrites 7 years ago from USA

any tips for squash bugs? other than to squash them....LOL


Nolimits Nana 7 years ago

Great hub about my favourite foods! Have 'em all planted, except the collards.


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Marisue glad to pass on some of my knowledge. I hope some new gardeners will find this hub helpful.

kindest regards Zsuzsy


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada Author

Thanks Bob for taking a look and for commenting. I can hardly wait for the fresh crops of greens to come from the garden.

Regards Zsuzsy


marisuewrites profile image

marisuewrites 7 years ago from USA

I love these@!!!! Love Love Love this hub!! Radicchio yummm! oooo miss Zsuzsy you outdid yourself...what a lot of knowledge and information here! This will take a while to digest...I'm going back for seconds.


Bob Ewing profile image

Bob Ewing 7 years ago from New Brunswick

Great greens, great hub and the message does need repeatin eat those greens and grow them when you can.

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