How to Make a Small Vegetable Garden at Home

This is the garden we planted this year.  Tomatoes, corn, okra, onions, habaneros and jalapenos are seen here.
This is the garden we planted this year. Tomatoes, corn, okra, onions, habaneros and jalapenos are seen here. | Source

Be Sure To Start Early

Well it's me again, Bubba Jasper bringing you a bit of info on how I build a small vegetable garden at home. If you have limited space as we do you'll want to use the area as efficiently as possible. The garden shown above is at my Mom's house and is about 16 feet by 20 feet and we have tomatoes, corn, okra, onions, habanero and jalapeno peppers growing in it. We made hills and rows in the garden to plant in. We started this garden from seeds (corn and onion) and with small plants (tomatoes, habaneros and jalapenos) and planted them on April 6, 2011. We actually planted the okra seeds on April 12, 2011. The okra seem to be coming in slowly for some reason. I don't think we've had enough really warm nights yet.

I do recommend starting early in the season to begin preparing your garden for planting. I actually had to work on our tiller by removing, cleaning and rebuilding the carburetor. Started on the first pull after cleaning it so I went immediately out to the garden area and tilled up the soil. Technically I like to add in some fertilizer to the soil at this point while tilling. We usually use Triple 12 which improves the nutrients in the soil and allows the plants to adjust to the shock of transplanting more easily. It also feeds the plants with additional nutrients which help them grow healthier and faster. It is some good stuff! That being said, we didn't use any this year and went ahead with planting our garden anyway which is perfectly fine to do. We have since added liquid plant food during watering a couple of times already which really helps the plants along.

I recommend planting the vegetables mentioned actually a little earlier than April, say probably the first week of March or earlier if you have warm weather by then. Please check with a gardening schedule for which plants to plant and when to plant them in your area. We got a little late start due to me being a little lazy working on our tiller but we will adapt and overcome!

Our garden is indeed growing and looking healthy. I might mention my Mom is the official overseer of this garden as it is at her house. She loves growing a garden and I am proud and happy to be helping her do this. Not to mention the delicious tomatoes and other veggies it will hopefully produce!

These are additional vegetables we are growing in large pots on the patio just mere feet from the garden.  There are white potatoes, red new potatoes and multiplying green onions.
These are additional vegetables we are growing in large pots on the patio just mere feet from the garden. There are white potatoes, red new potatoes and multiplying green onions. | Source

How WeTransplant Plants into the Garden

As I mentioned we made hills in our garden to transplant our plants in. These hills are approximately 4" to 6" 's high and are about 2 to 3 feet apart. The spacing allows room for each plant to grow. To plant the tomato plants for instance we dug into the center of each hill of soil about 4" 's down. Added a little water to the hole and dropped in the plant including the roots and soil from the small planter they were in. Seat the plant gently and fill in the hole with soil until your hill is back to its original size and move on to the next one. We laid out our plants individually alongside each hill and planted them one by one until we were finished. We laid them out in order to see how the garden would look before actually planting them. We also made 2 rows on the far side to plant the okra seeds in. The corn is at the foot of the garden in 2 rows as well.  To plant the corn and okra we made a trench about an inch deep on top of each row with our fingers, dropped in the seeds and covered them with soil.  Pretty simple really! 

Additionally we wanted some potatoes and multiplying green onions but didn't have room in our garden so being country people we adapted and overcame. We planted them in large buckets and placed them on our patio. They are doing fine there and look great. Yes you too can grow any type of vegetables in buckets on your patio.

These are some cayenne pepper plants that I will transplant in our garden this week.  I grew these from seeds.  My brother-in-law, Rudie, will get some of these plants as well.
These are some cayenne pepper plants that I will transplant in our garden this week. I grew these from seeds. My brother-in-law, Rudie, will get some of these plants as well. | Source

Watering and Caring for Your Garden

We water once a day, everyday! We water our garden every evening after the sun has gone down. This is very important as the sun heats the plants and surrounding soil throughout the day and watering while they are hot can kill your plants! Always water early morning or late evening to give your plants a better chance of survival. You've worked too hard up to this point to kill them by watering while they're hot.

No need to flood your garden, just water until the soil is fairly wet. Your garden will thank you by growing and producing some delicious vegetables for you! Be sure to periodically remove any weeds from your garden. Keep the soil loose surrounding the plants by hoeing and/or raking the dirt between each plant. This keeps air in the soil and allows for easier watering and plant growth.

If you decide to plant a vegetable garden at your home please stick with it. Don't be discouraged if your plants aren't growing as fast or healthy as you expected. You could have a great garden one year and a terrible garden the next. That's just how it goes sometimes.

You can check on the internet, your local nurseries, libraries, etc... for info on how, when and what vegetables to grow in your area so don't give up. I promise the rewards are worth every back breaking minute you will put in it!

So as not to disappoint my readers I will include a recipe for fried corn the way my Mom taught me to make it.

Fried Corn

  • 10 or more ears of fresh corn on the cob
  • 1/4 cup cooking oil
  • salt and pepper to taste

Begin by cutting and scraping the kernels of corn from each cob into a large bowl. Pour oil into a large skillet over medium high heat. Add in corn and stir. Add salt and pepper. Cook covered over medium to medium high heat, stirring occassionally until done to your liking. You can add a little water to the skillet while cooking to keep it from drying out.

I like to add a little real butter to the skillet when done. We serve this with fresh green onions and sliced fresh tomatoes. Great with lemon iced tea! Man I want some right now!

Remember:

Food is good! Long live the farmer! Long live the chef! Long live the stove!

Thanks again,
Bubba

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Comments 6 comments

McGilwriter profile image

McGilwriter 5 years ago from Florida

Great hub! I voted it useful. I think more people should have gardens.


Bubba Jasper profile image

Bubba Jasper 5 years ago from The Lone Star State Author

Thank you McGilwriter! We really enjoy having a garden. We will actually remove these plants after they have given up their bounties and replant with fall vegetables. Thanks again!


brsmom68 profile image

brsmom68 5 years ago from Alberta, Canada

I am getting my garden ready to plant very soon. I have several garden beds which worked quite nicely last year. I have never had beets as big as the ones from last year...ten pint jars of beet pickles from six beets!


Bubba Jasper profile image

Bubba Jasper 5 years ago from The Lone Star State Author

brsmom68, thanks for reading my hub! I remember even when I was a kid eating pickled beets. My Mom's aunt used to can them from her garden. I guess I have been eating them as far back as I can remember! We love gardening and I am a country boy anyhow so I grew up eating fresh vegetables! More people should experience what I call the simpler things in life! Thanks again!


brsmom68 profile image

brsmom68 5 years ago from Alberta, Canada

I kept an herb planter in my house all this winter. It was nice to have fresh garlic chives, oregano and thyme to toss into my cooking. I have regular chives out in my garden, and will most definitely be adding a bundle of them to my herb planter. Chives, butter and spices are great with chicken...and fresh asparagus tossed in a few minutes before serving.

You're right...there is nothing quite like fresh vegetables; they are much more flavorful than store-bought produce as they have been given the proper time to grow. So much of the commercially grown produce is forced to grow fast, thus losing its flavor.


Demas Jasper 2 years ago

It's Gardening Season again! One of the best things about writing or garden Hubs is the quick links it gives to other gardening Hubsl. This is a good one, and much appreciate.

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