How to Paint an Interior Wall with Stripes

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Walls with Stripes

A remake of a room is an exciting project. Painting stripes is a good redo project that enlivens a room.

Striped walls give the illusion of a larger room. Horizontal stripes seem to extend the length of the room, and vertical stripes create the illusion of height.

Stripes add eye appeal to the room. Vary the color by using a dark and light shade, or two complimentary hues, or resemblant hues. Another way to differ the stripes is painting the stripe with gloss and the wall with flat paint.

Perfect Paint Lines

Painting Stripes on Walls: The Colors

Firstly, choose the two colors to use. Decide the ambiance you want for the room. Tints of the same hue are a good combination with no worries about colors clashing.

Light colors can be used to make a room look more capacious if combined with light furniture, curtains, shades, or drapes and lamp shades. Every bit of decor combines with the light walls to make the room look roomier.

Dark colors require abundant light. They add a quiet distinctiveness to the room. Yellow, orange, and red go with dark brown, if brighter hues are too daring, then blue, dark green, or plum will add a less intense look.

Accentuate a black wall with muted or stark hues of yellow, red, and green. Metallic and white room accessories go well with black walls. Varnishing a black wall adds a striking effect.

Black is basically the absence of color because it doesn't totally assimilate the light. Yet, an undercurrent of green, brown, violet, or blue is found in black. So, meticulously choose the black hue to use and add a touch of it in the room's interior design: lamps, mirrors, drapes.

Firstly, choose the two colors to use. Decide the ambiance you want for the room. Tints of the same hue are a good combination with no worries about colors clashing.

Light colors can be used to make a room look more capacious if combined with light furniture, curtains, shades, or drapes and lamp shades. Every bit of décor combines with the light walls to make the room look roomier.

Dark colors require abundant light. They add a quiet distinctiveness to the room. Yellow, orange, and red go with dark brown, if brighter hues are too daring, then blue, dark green, or plum will add a less intense look.

Accentuate a black wall with muted or stark hues of yellow, red, and green. Metallic and white room accessories go well with black walls. Varnishing a black wall adds a striking effect.

Black is basically the absence of color because it doesn't totally assimilate the light. Yet, an undercurrent of green, brown, violet, or blue is found in black. So, meticulously choose the black hue to use and add a touch of it in the room's interior design: lamps, mirrors, drapes.

Taping Textured Walls

Painting Stripes on Walls: The Colors

Firstly, choose the two colors to use. Decide the ambiance you want for the room. Tints of the same hue are a good combination with no worries about colors clashing.

Light colors can be used to make a room look more capacious if combined with light furniture, curtains, shades, or drapes and lamp shades. Every bit of décor combines with the light walls to make the room look roomier.

Dark colors require abundant light. They add a quiet distinctiveness to the room. Yellow, orange, and red go with dark brown, if brighter hues are too daring, then blue, dark green, or plum will add a less intense look.

Accentuate a black wall with muted or stark hues of yellow, red, and green. Metallic and white room accessories go well with black walls. Varnishing a black wall adds a striking effect.

Black is basically the absence of color because it doesn't totally assimilate the light. Yet, an undercurrent of green, brown, violet, or blue is found in black. So, meticulously choose the black hue to use and add a touch of it in the room's interior design: lamps, mirrors, drapes.

Resemblant or Analogous Hues

Resemblant hues reside by each other on the color wheel. Red-orange and yellow-green are examples of analogous colors.

RYB Chart

  • The primary colors are red, yellow, and blue.
  • Violet, orange, and green are the secondary colors.
  • The tertiary colors are red-orange, yellow-orange, yellow-green, blue-green, blue-violet, and red-violet.

Combine two primary hues to make secondary colors. Combining a primary and a secondary color, or mixing two secondary colors results in a tertiary hue.


Tone on Tone Stripes

Tone on Tone Stripes

Make a decision concerning the hue for the room. Pick two hues close in color. Decide whether to paint horizontal or vertical stripes. Paint the base coat. Let base coat dry for twenty-four hours. Maybe longer in humid regions. Repaint base coat, if needed. Measure the stripes in equal measurements. Tape in the areas that will be stripes. Use low-tack painter's tape. Paint the stripes. Let dry. Remove the tape.

Gloss and Matte: Using Same Shade

Tone on tone can be done using a shiny and a matte color. First, paint the flat base coat color on wall; it might need two applications. Allow it to dry. Measure stripes and apply low-tack tape for painters. Apply gloss paint inside of marked areas. It's just like coloring inside the lines.

This method is light dependent. A bold and dramatic or a soft and subtle atmosphere is created according to the amount, intensity, and direction of the light source(s). Sharp lightening makes the pattern stand out and low lightening makes the pattern neutralize, or diminish in clarity. It works best on a wide wall.



Paint Vertical Stripe

Vertical Stripes

Vertical stripes make a room with a low ceiling seem more spacious. These stripes steer the eye up the wall and create the effect of a seemingly higher ceiling.

Paint Horizontal Stripe

Horizontal Stripes

Horizontal stripes enlarge the room's look since they seem to move the walls outward, which helps a small room.

Painting horizontal stripes in one hue or more works well. The options are to paint several stripes in the center area of the wall, or to paint more stripes that include the whole wall. One stripe with a wide girth in the wall's center works like an emphasis and a few slimmer ones centered has the same effect.

Measuring Stripes: What Width to Paint Stripes?

What width will the stripes be? Stripes that are too narrow make the four walls overly active. Examples of this are three to four inch widths. This effect isn't visually agreeable to most people. But a thinner stripe can work on an accent wall as it doesn't have the overactive effect.

Six inch or twelve inch wide stripes are a common choice. A slim stripe gives a formal look and a wide stripe an informal more relaxed appearance. Some experts say the range for stripe widths is four to ten inches, opinions vary.

The quintessential method of stripe painting is equal width stripes though using two widths, or more is done



How to Measure Stripes: Horizontal or Vertical

Measure across the wall's width, or its height according to the direction of the desired stripes. Divide the figure by the width the stripes will be.

Mark the width of the stripes with a pencil using a measuring tape, or yardstick. Make the lines with plumb line using blue chalk; it is not a permanent color. A plumb line works better with vertical stripes.

Tape the outline of alternate stripes because the base coat will form one stripe and the stripe paint the other stripe. Place tape outside of the chalk line. Painting will make the chalk disappear.

For horizontal stripes, mark with pencil according to the width of the stripe using measuring tape or yardstick. Make straight lines for stripes using a level. Place the low-tack tape firmly to avoid bleeding of paint. Use a pencil to tag which stripes to paint.

Starting in an obscure corner will prevent a problem with a little difference in a stripe's width, when the measurements aren't perfect. Adjusting the width of the stripes on the final wall will make it more exact. Adjust by a quarter to a half inch to correct the stripes. This small correction won't be noticed.

Zig Zag Wall Shelf

Danya B. Large Corner Wall Mount Shelf - Walnut
Danya B. Large Corner Wall Mount Shelf - Walnut

Color: walnut, 7.75x7.75x48.5 inches, comes with hardware, materials: MDF & laminate

 

Striped Wall Painting: Measuring for Two or More Vertical Stripe Widths

Decide width of widest stripe. Measure the wall's length. Remember the inches. Divide this number by the stripe's width. This calculates how many stripes will suit the space. If the number of stripes is even, vary the width by multiplication of the total stripe figure by an even number. This doesn't work if the stripe total is uneven. It produces a half of a stripe at one end.

To solve this problem use the half of a stripe to move into the next wall at the corner and continue the motif onto the next wall, or re-figure to get an even number of stripes.

Since this is a more complex pattern of wall stripes think of ratios. According to the painted surface.com dividing in thirds of the wall measure is a good idea.




Diagonal Stripes

Paint diagonal stripes on one wall. This creates an accent wall. First measure wall's width. Divide the stripe's width into the width of the wall. Say the wall is 10 feet wide, multiply 10 (feet) by 12 (inches) which equals 120. Divide 120 by 10 which equals 12. The diagonal stripes will be 12 inches wide.

Another Method

  • Decide the width of the stripes first.
  • Calculate the perimeter of the room using inches. Divide the answer by the stripe's width to get the number of stripes to go on the wall.

The stripe measurement may come out with an odd stripe. Put this stripe in a corner to stop it from standing out.




Tools for Measuring Stripes

  • yardstick, ruler, or tape measure
  • pencil

  • level

  • low-tack painter's tape


Painting Preparation

  • Prepare the walls by dusting.
  • Wash away dirty spots.
  • Sand bumps and uneven spots with sandpaper and sanding block;
  • Or use electric sander.
  • Apply painter's tape to wall trim
  • Scrap flaking paint.
  • Paint with primer to fix small defects on walls

Prep Tools

  • Dust cloth or vacuum cleaner
  • Soap and cloth
  • Sand paper, sanding block or electric sander
  • Paint scraper
  • Paint brush and roller
  • Drop cloth


Stripe Painting Tools

  • Paint
  • Brush
  • Roller
  • Low-tack tape
  • Drop cloth

After the work is done the room is like new, but with an enhanced look and atmosphere. The illusion is created, and it is time to sit and enjoy it, or have a party

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Comments 6 comments

ktrapp profile image

ktrapp 3 years ago from Illinois

I've been considering painting stripes in one room of my house and I think I may just do it. I want it to be subtle, not like a circus or anything, so I probably will either do tone on tone or the same shade alternating matte and gloss horizontally. Thanks for the tips on measuring stripes, and prep tips too.


Deltachord profile image

Deltachord 3 years ago from United States Author

You are very welcome, ktrapp. Hope you enjoy the new look of your room. Thanks for commenting.


Dolores Monet profile image

Dolores Monet 3 years ago from East Coast, United States

Thanks for the tips. I know 2 people who did this and the stripes look beautiful! Don't think I'd have the patience.


Deltachord profile image

Deltachord 3 years ago from United States Author

Yes, it would definitely take patience. Not sure I'd have the patience either. Thanks for your comments.


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

Hi, I would never have thought of painting stripes, but it sounds great. I am going to paint my front room so maybe I will give it a go, or get my friend to do it as she has a steadier hand! lol! voted up! nell


Deltachord profile image

Deltachord 3 years ago from United States Author

Hope you like the stripes, if you decide to go stripes. Thanks for the vote up.

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