How to Save Arugula Seeds

Source

Arugula is a fast growing garden green and is great for adding spice to a salad mix. In the fall, your arugula plants will produce seed pods. The seed pods are edible, and even spicier than the leaves of the plant. You can plant arugula continuously year after year without ever buying seeds again by saving your seed from your harvest. Arugula seeds will last for at least four years in storage. The seeds are ready to be harvested once the entire plant turns brown.

What You Need

Scissors

String

Rubber band

paper bag

Shallow pan

Zip lock bag

Step 1

Stop watering your arugula once the plants turn brown. Check the pods each day by shaking them. If they rattle they are ready to be harvested.

Step 2

Cut the stems of the arugula at the base of the plant. Bunch together small bundles of arugula, and tie the bottom end of the stems with a piece of string.

Step 3

Wrap and rubber band a paper bag around the pods on each bundle. Hang the bundles upside down in a dry location for 1 to 2 weeks.

Step 4

Shake the bag to loosen seeds from the open pods. Use your hands to crumble the dried seed pods and loosen any remaining seeds.

Step 5

Place the seeds in a shallow pan and blow off the papery seed pod chaff. Store your seeds in a zip lock bag. Write the date on the bag and store it in the refrigerator until you are ready to plant the seeds.

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Comments 1 comment

teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 3 years ago

Robin, I only wish I had a garden again so that I could make use of this wonderful idea. I love argula and eat it as often as possible, usually in salads or on top of pizza. Great hub post and very benenficial to the body and mind.

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