Human Powered Kitchen Appliances | Hand Crank Kitchen Gadgets | Non-Electric Kitchens

The Amish Little Dutch Maid Mixer
The Amish Little Dutch Maid Mixer
Amish Hand Crank Kitchen Aid Conversion Mixer
Amish Hand Crank Kitchen Aid Conversion Mixer
Amish Made Egg Beater
Amish Made Egg Beater
New Glass Butter Churn
New Glass Butter Churn
Food/Tomato processor
Food/Tomato processor
GrainMaker Grain Mill
GrainMaker Grain Mill
Fruit Press
Fruit Press
Hand Crank Ice cream freezer
Hand Crank Ice cream freezer
Stainless Steel Drainboard
Stainless Steel Drainboard

I can remember my Grandads farmhouse with maybe only one outlet, and that was used for an old tube type AM radio that he use to listen to the farm report.

Can you imagine a time when there was not an electrical plug located in the kitchen, or even a kitchen appliance with an electric cord available?

I can remember my Grandads farmhouse with maybe only one outlet, and that was used for an old tube type AM radio that he used to listen to the farm report.

The visits were a treat sifting the flour with a hand crank sifter, making homemade cookies, and then playing out in the the barn loft and watching all the farm animals.

Later that evening we would crank up a fresh batch of homemade ice cream. The grownups would sit around the kitchen table to play cards, while the kids played a game of croquet.

The highlight was being allowed to go out to the chicken coop and collect the eggs for our breakfast the next morning. He would always let me use the hand crank egg beater to mix up the pancake batter.

I think one of the reasons that I enjoy visiting our Amish friends each year is the memories of visiting Grandads place and seeing once again all the practical ways they work in the kitchen without electrical gadgets and appliances.

The Amish love to cook and I love to eat the home cooking. It is amazing how much food they can make without an electric mixer, or dishwasher to clean up after words.

Besides cooking for large families it is not uncommon for the Amish to cook for several days ahead to serve a gathering of 30 families for a wedding or Sunday Church.

They still use some of the old hand crank tools that many of us see as antiques today, but they are very inventing and resourceful people who share with each other.

The Little Dutch Maid hand crank mixer and food processor was designed by an Amish gentleman to mix and process large batches of food for Amish weddings and other gatherings. It will whip up a batch of mashed potatoes or make enough dough for up to five loaves of bread at one time.

The Amish are also very adaptable, taking electric items and converting them to hand crank. They have even converted the standard Kitchen Aid mixer to hand crank.

The Amish also raise large gardens and grow their own meats. They home can most of their items for the winter months as the freezers are small gas or battery operated with small compartments.

They use a hand crank Food/Tomato Strainer to process the fruits for jams, and tomatoes for sauces. The strainer takes the cooked product and separates the pulp and seeds into one pan while allowing the juice to flow into another pan.

Butter is still made in a hand crank butter churn, and grain is ground into flour using a hand crank grain mill. Occasionally for large batches of flour the Amish will hook up a gasoline powered motor to turn the flywheel.

Ice Cream is still made in a hand crank freezer while apple cider and wine, yes wine, is squeezed in a hand crank fruit press.

When the cooking and food prep is all done the dishes are washed by hand, a large Stainless Steel drainboard keeps the water and suds in the kitchen sink as the large pots and pans are allowed to dry.

For those who would like to find these old time but modern hand crank products, they can actually be purchased online at Cottage Craft Works.com

http://www.cottagecraftworks.com/kitchen-food-prep/cooking-equipment/off-grid-food-processors

Cottage Craft Works is a unique online store featuring many of the Amish made and used kitchen and food processing items.

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Comments 1 comment

ZiimpLementhe 23 months ago

Good question Katy. The anwser is: yes and no. No, I don't develop these further, and turn them into something finished. But they are like practice for me....like a piano player practicing scales. Do it a bunch of times and it becomes second nature. I learn a lot about composition from doing these little doodles: focus, balance, value, proportion, juxtapositions of shapes etc., which I definitely apply in my finished pieces. My feeling is when you're not worrying about rendering stuff, you can concentrate solely on composition.

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