Planting And Inexpensive Garden Decorating Ideas

Some chairs, buckets and jugs do the trick

With just two of us and guests to grow for this year, the quarter Acre garden/orchard lot has some extra space this year.  So I decorated it.
With just two of us and guests to grow for this year, the quarter Acre garden/orchard lot has some extra space this year. So I decorated it. | Source

Easter colors brighten a garden spot

In 2015 I planted tomatoes in painted soap buckets having drilled holes in the bottoms, a layer of small rocks and soil from the garden, and a top layer of potting soil. Their yields were good and there was no need for weeding them.

To add to the scene, I spray painted the buckets with yellow, red, green, and blue spray paint.

The following year we added a secondary water system and no longer needed a handy supply of saved milk jugs filled with water to add water to key areas of the garden/orchard during extended dry days, so I decided the gallon jugs could also be used to add color.

Spray painting fresh paint onto the buckets was a breeze, and, by purchasing a package of food coloring at a local supermarket, I set about adding the colored water jugs to the scene.

The one package of food coloring was sufficient to turn 62 gallon jugs of water into the rainbow of colors you see in the photo above, by adding 12 drops of the various food coloring colors to individual jugs of water and tightening the caps that had been saved.

Plain buckets can be purchased, but we simply used buckets we had saved over the years. The milk jugs accumulated from having as many as nine of us here for parts of each month, and enjoying milk as part of our daily foods and beverage.

The previous year's soil mix and small rocks refilled the tomato buckets once the paint was freshened and a little fresh potting soil was added.

The whole exercise ran about $20.00 excluding the cost of the fresh potting soil used, and the work was done while nighttime temperatures were too low for putting our transplants in the garden.

Painting some pots, and coloring some jugs of water, can add color to a deck, porch, or garden area. I chose the basic colors, but the color choices are all yours.

Happy gardening!

Garden Plans For 2016

Will you be having some of your own home grown vegetables and herbs this year?

See results without voting

2015 Wear and Tear, placed around an added pyramid.

Repainted in 2016, strawberries are added to the pyramid in this otherwise unused portion of the garden/orchard lot.
Repainted in 2016, strawberries are added to the pyramid in this otherwise unused portion of the garden/orchard lot. | Source
Now all I have to do is plant, water, weed, and harvest this and the prepared garden areas which follow this photo!
Now all I have to do is plant, water, weed, and harvest this and the prepared garden areas which follow this photo! | Source
Source
....and, of course, there is mowing to be done around the edges and in the lawn areas of this quarter Acre.
....and, of course, there is mowing to be done around the edges and in the lawn areas of this quarter Acre. | Source

What will be planted in the 2016 Garden?

Vegetables and Fruits
Depth/Apart/Row Spacing
Days To First Harvest
Tomatoes
1/4"/20"/24"
55-100*
Pole Beans
1"/3"/18"
55
Cucumbers
4@1"/18"/6'
45-65
Garlic
2"/6"/12"
180
Radishes
1/2"/1"/10"
24
Melons
1.25"/20"/24'
100
Cabbage
1/4"/24"/36"
70
Kohlrabi
1/2"/4"/12"
55
Beets
1/2"/4"/16"
55-60
Summer Squash
4@1"/4'/4'
50
Spinach
3/4"/5"12"
42
Lettuce
1/8"/2"/15"
30-65
Winter Squash
4@1"/4'/4'
95
Pumpkin
3@1"/24"/36"
110-120
Corn
1/2"/15"/18"
60-70
Sweet Peppers
1/4"/20"/30"
70
 
 
* Tomatoes and other crops grown from transplants have shorter growing times. Times listed presume growth from seeds planted outdoors.

Harvest Times

Summer Squash. 7/12
Beets 7/17
Radishes 6/17
Kohlrabi 7/17
Spinach 7/4
Cucumbers 7/12
Tomatoes 7/17+
Garlic 8/21
Pole Beans 7/17
Melons 8/31
Lettuce 6/23+
Winter Squash. 8/27
Pumpkin 9/6
Zucchini 7/13
Corn 7/27
[Times are approximate, so allow as much as an extra week, if planting June 1, 2016.]

____________

© 2016 Demas W. Jasper All rights reserved.

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16 comments

Dana Tate profile image

Dana Tate 6 months ago from LOS ANGELES

My Aunt grows her own vegetables in her back yard. I thought about planting my own but I'm afraid I don't have a green thumb.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 6 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

Dana Tate - God, the soil, and the sunshine do most of the "green thumbing." But they can't do your vegetables for you, if you don't put some good seeds in the soil and "add water as needed." You can do it, Dana. Your aunt would probably enjoy assisting and teaching you, don't you think?


vocalcoach profile image

vocalcoach 6 months ago from Nashville Tn.

What a good idea this is! Inexpensive and fairly easy - great combination. Nothing taste as delicious as home-grown tomatoes.

Sharing.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 6 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

vocalcoach - Yes tomatoes give the other fruits a run for their money, and at $1.49/lb. (16 oz.) they seem to be at the top of the price list for fruits, too!

Cucumbers are one of the cheaper fruits.


vocalcoach profile image

vocalcoach 6 months ago from Nashville Tn.

I love cucumbers. I can't seem to get used to calling them a fruit. :)


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 6 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

vocalcoach - They are indeed a fruit, no matter how you slice them.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 6 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

Added photos and planting/harvesting information have been added to this Hub the afternoon of 5/18/2016.


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 6 months ago from USA

I like the color that you've added to your world. That's a nice big garden!


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 6 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

FlourishAnyway - It is already an orchard, but it is not a "garden" until I get it planted! Some of that is on the schedule today.


MizBejabbers profile image

MizBejabbers 6 months ago

Wow, Demas, some great ideas. We have some plants growing in buckets like that, too, because we grow them in our atrium in front of the house. We have an unusable half acre on a steep hillside. It would be cost preventative for us to try to make the landscape usable.

We buy cat litter in buckets, and I've been saving those to use for plants, but we have a maintenance project going that prevents us from planting more plants this year, so I may have to recycle some of them. We use about one bucket of cat litter a week. Your idea of painting the buckets would work for my cat litter buckets, too. I hadn't thought of that. Gee thanks!


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 6 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

MizBejabbers = That's surely a lot of Kitty Litter! How big are those buckets of it, and how big a herd of felines are you raising? You can drill holes in those buckets' sides and implant strawberries, too. Watering operates on the only "trickle down" system that ever seems to have worked!


MizBejabbers profile image

MizBejabbers 6 months ago

LOL, Demas, true. After thinking about it, I believe we buy a bucket every two weeks, but sometimes the cats do go through more. We buy litter in 38 lb. buckets. We have only two housecats, but one of them is diabetic. It's hard to imagine how much water goes through a diabetic cat.

I don't know why I didn't think of drilling holes in the sides to plant strawberry plants. We had to take up our strawberry plants recently to do some work in our atrium where they were planted in the ground, so my husband bought some plastic strawberry planters that didn't cost much. We've had the clay ones before but they dry out too fast and they don't last too long, especially around Mr. Clumsy.


MizBejabbers profile image

MizBejabbers 6 months ago

Speaking of water trickling down, when we were using a greenhouse to house my (at that time) many plants, my husband rigged up a watering system from a plastic pipe with holes over each hanging pot. The pipe was connected to the large tank from an old toilet sitting higher upon a shelf. He just filled the tank a couple of times a day, depending on how often the plants needed water, and flushed. Just call him Mr. Gadget.

And I agree that water is the only thing that trickles down, unless you count the coffee I spilled on my pants today.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 6 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

: - )


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 6 months ago from Stillwater, OK

You have some nice color around there and the quarter acre looks so big.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 6 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

aviannovice - When it was time to plant the quarter acre, it was big!

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