Kitchen Critique: Cuisinart Bucket Style Frozen Yogurt, Ice Cream, and Sorbet Maker

Cuisinart frozen Yogurt, Ice Cream, and Sorbet Maker
Cuisinart frozen Yogurt, Ice Cream, and Sorbet Maker | Source

Not Your Mom's Ice Cream Maker

My family loves ice cream, but, looking at the ingredients on the back of a store bought ice cream container makes me cringe. There are more chemicals and preservatives than milk and cream in each serving-even the better named brands have a long list of names you cannot pronounce. I needed a more organic product that I could make at home.

I have wanted an ice cream maker for years, but I had no desire to deal with the salt and chemicals of the machines from days past. As I researched products, I found there were many modern electronic models that allowed for making good-for-you frozen treats. The makers range from moderately priced to very expensive. Models come in many different fun colors, various sizes, and cater to different needs.

Cuisinart's top allows for viewing the process of creating the soft serve treat.
Cuisinart's top allows for viewing the process of creating the soft serve treat. | Source
The Cuisinart makes a creamy soft serve that your family will enjoy in 20 short minutes.
The Cuisinart makes a creamy soft serve that your family will enjoy in 20 short minutes. | Source

A Refurbished Jewel

I am not a person that normally buys refurbished products, but when I came across a Cuisinart Frozen Yogurt, Ice Cream, and Sorbet Maker at Big Lots for $23.00, I took a leap of faith and purchased it. It looks like an old fashioned churn but without all the undesired salt and chemicals. It is a nice size that fits on the counter top and only has four components-the churn, the top, the freezer bowl and the paddle.

The freezer bowl stays in the freezer at least 24 hours before making the ice cream. It's not large and fits in the freezer easily. It needs to be wrapped while freezing-I used a plastic grocery bag. Do not take the bowl out until you have all your ingredients mixed and ready to churn.

I chose to keep it simple for my first try at making a homemade frozen treat. Keeping with our goal of healthier living, I made frozen yogurt made with organic Greek yogurt and cream from grass-fed cows. I added vanilla and sweetened it with agave. I mixed all ingredients together and put them in the refrigerator to chill while I prepared the maker. It is important to use ingredients that are very chilled.

Honestly, I don’t think I could have picked a better suited machine for our household than the Cuisinart. After the ingredients are poured into the freezer bowl, which fits into the base perfectly, the churn device is added as well as the top. All you do now is flip the switch and in 20 short minutes you have the creamiest soft serve you can imagine. No chemicals, no salt, no loud churning…just ice cream heaven.

A Short Demonstration

Canned and frozen fruit add fresh flavor to homemade ice cream.
Canned and frozen fruit add fresh flavor to homemade ice cream. | Source

Flavor Your Imagination

The varieties of ice cream, yogurt, and sorbets are limited only by your imagination. If you can or freeze fruit and jams, you have flavors right at your fingertips-peach, strawberry, blueberry, blackberry-ingredients that you have total control over.

With the Cuisinart, fruit, nuts, cookies, or anything else you love can be added during the last five minutes of churning. The added ingredients need to be chopped or crumbled so that it can be churned into the ice cream.

After a few tweaks, I have discovered the best tasting frozen yogurt is made with two cups of heavy cream and one cup of Greek yogurt. This is the base that any flavor or ingredient can be added to. Always use fresh ingredients-organic when possible-so that your frozen treat will be delicious and healthy.

Many recipes for homemade ice cream, yogurt, and sorbets can be found on the internet but there are also some fantastic books available too.

Healthy Ice Cream Is A Must

Where do you get your ice cream?

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About the Author

Catherine Dean is a freelance writer, gardener, quilter, and blogger. Her professional background includes nonprofit program development, grant writing, and volunteer management. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Mass Communications from Georgia College & State University.

Her blog, Sowing A Simple Harvest, chronicles a modern couple trying to live a simplistic, sustainable life. To explore Catherine's professional credentials, visit her website. She can also be followed on Google+.

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