Momeni Wool, Silk Area Rugs Review: Java, Tibet, Delhi

Momeni Handmade

Momeni Java, Tibet and Delhi collections – all named after geographical locations – offer handmade rugs featuring contemporary and transitional patterns. Contemporary designs usually display some degree of abstraction, but rarely reach the level apparent in New Wave area rugs offered by the brand; transitional weaves display large scale floral motifs, dispersed freely across the surface. Many of the botanical representations reveal an aesthetic affinity to wallpaper design.

Often the only difference between the three collections lies in the richness of technique and materials: Momeni employ Chinese and Indian artisan weavers who use wool and silk of varying origins, and hand tufting or hand knotting methods. Purer raw materials and more laborious work techniques result in more durable (and often costlier) rugs.

The addition of silk enhances both the visual and the textural quality of the carpets, rendering them softer and shinier. Rectangle, round, square, and runner variations exist. Let's take a closer look at these collections:

Momeni Hand Knotted Rug
Momeni Hand Knotted Rug

Java

One of Momeni's hand knotted collections, Java accommodates two categories of patterns: very soft abstract compositions that might in fact be interpreted as stylized oriental ornament – these usually cover the entire rug – and transitional floral designs (vines twisting across the surface), reminiscent of Momeni Harmony.

Chinese wool and silk are used to make these area rugs.

Tibet

Hand tufted from wool and highlighted by silk, Tibet carpets feature neutral colors (beige, light brown, olive green, and others) and matching calm design. Allover patterns of botanical (realistic or stylized, depending on the model) origin produce a somewhat hypnotic effect, rendering the rugs a potential atmospheric decoration.

Delhi

Also hand-tufted, Momeni Delhi rugs combine influences from New Wave and Maison, but also boast a unique pattern where oversized blooms of various flowers (for instance camomile, or buttercups) create a colorful and exciting bustle. It's the opposite of Tibet in that it injects rhythm and movement, aiming to awaken rather than lull.

Momeni Delhi a relatively broad ranged collection that hosts some surprisingly quirky and humorous weaves besides more classical ones.

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