Quick Plant Care Guides: Planting Seeds and Growing Standing Cypress Ipomopsis

Standing Cypress (Ipomopsis rubra) Seeds
Standing Cypress (Ipomopsis rubra) Seeds

About Standing Cypress (Ipomopsis Rubra)

Standing cypress (Ipomopsis rubra) is an annual wildflower found all across AL, AR, DE, FL, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, MI, MO, MS, NC, NJ, NY, OH, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA, WI as well as in parts of Canada. This plant may be found in other areas outside this range. Standing cypress grows tall, to six feet or more and has an upright habit making is a good candidate for background plantings as well as for use as a living screen. This plant attracts hummingbirds, butterflies, honeybees and other beneficial pollinators. The seeds are attractive to all sorts of wildlife.


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Photo Credit: Campbell and Lynn Loughmiller, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
Photo Credit: Campbell and Lynn Loughmiller, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

How To Grow Standing Cypress

Culture: Background plantings, as a screen, insect/animal food. Reported to grow indoors as a houseplant.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6 to 10 (annual, perennial or biennial)

Soil: Adaptable. Moist, well-drained, dry and rocky.

Feeding: Bloom enhancing fertilizers

Sun: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Yellow Standing Cypress: Photo Credit: Joseph A. Marcus, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
Yellow Standing Cypress: Photo Credit: Joseph A. Marcus, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
Standing Cypress Seedling: Photo Credit: Wildflower Center Staff, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
Standing Cypress Seedling: Photo Credit: Wildflower Center Staff, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

What To Do

Sow seeds, covering them with a light layer of soil. No more than one-quarter inch is deep enough. In warm climates, sow in the fall; colder climates should sow after all danger of frost has passed in the spring. Start indoors in a greenhouse to get a jump on the growing season.

Broadcast the seeds or plant in neat or staggered rows. Keep soil moist until seeds germinate and plantlets have several inches of growth. Once several inches of growth appear; mulch well to retain the soils’ moisture. Remove spent stalks to encourage new blossoms.

Standing cypress colors include red, orange, yellow and a mix of these shades. The foliage is ferny with an airy feel and look. This growth habit makes standing cypress great for adding soft mass to gardens. Relatively pest-free.

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Comments 4 comments

50 Caliber profile image

50 Caliber 5 years ago from Arizona

Great job! I want to grow Poppies, the good kind. Are they late or early planters? I've set a hot box over a patch of prime soil to start about 2 rows 15 feet long, the Sheriff and I were burning a blunt and he said it was better than most he confiscated but I needed to stop growing it out in the open, so it's crop changing time, ha! 50


IsadoraPandora profile image

IsadoraPandora 5 years ago from Florida, PCB Author

Provide them with well-drained, loamy soil. You know that good black earth that grows everything so well?

I was reading that they prefer mountain-type growing conditions if the weather is hot. Cool weather over hot.

An naturally, feed them with worm castings and various compost tea. Don't bother with that toxic, synthetic crap.

For you I would place the plants on the coolest part of your property. I'll be honest with you, if the plants are watered and mulched well enough, they will probably thrive in the desert.

Remember not to use lots of nitrogen fertilizer on them!

Your Sheriff sounds cool.

If your growing medicinals, try Salvia divinorum,Desmodium gyrans, catnip, mugwort and look up a few others. Good stuff to keep around. I don't now about the salvia, I've never grown it.


50 Caliber profile image

50 Caliber 5 years ago from Arizona

I work search and rescue as a volunteer with 3 working dogs, Rottys, for finding people out here, they underestimate the heat, getting stuck and a host of things then they try to walk out and leave the shade of their vehicle that we find fast then we have to track what direction town is. So the Sheriff, deputy looks the other way a lot around here, he has keys to the gate and surprise visits when he doesn't want to work or be found is out here often.

Thanks for the info. Peace Dusty


IsadoraPandora profile image

IsadoraPandora 5 years ago from Florida, PCB Author

You're very welcome. I would do more research before planting any. There may be sites dedicated to desert growers out there. I am from Florida and have done most of my gardening in the humid South, so don't know a lot about arid gardening.

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