Growing Hibiscus: Eye Candy for Your Yard---A Photo Journal

Vibrant, Showy Plant

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The more often we see the things around us - even the beautiful and wonderful things - the more they become invisible to us. That is why we often take for granted the beauty of this world: the flowers, the trees, the birds, the clouds - even those we love. Because we see things so often, we see them less and less.

— Joseph B. Wirthlin

Over the weeks that this article has been in publication, I have been adding new photographs of these prolific bloomers. Adding photographs of some new ones today.

The hibiscus is one of those flowers that make the passer-by pause if not stop to view it. It is sassy and perky and waiting to be noticed. My yard is usually filled with them but last year's winter here in north central Florida zapped them.

.The pots that housed them were so large I was unable to move them inside as is my custom. I covered them with quilts and still that was not enough cover. They succumbed in the cold.

I have begun acquiring them again and hope to once again be surrounded by these flowers. They are so hardy and demand little. Smaller pots were used for these hibiscus so they could be brought inside. This spring they will be transplanted to larger pots.

Each new bloom is more elegant than the last.

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Learn How to Prune Your Hibiscus

Another Beauty Has Shown Her Face

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I will be the gladdest thing under the sun! I will touch a hundred flowers and not pick one.

— Edna St. Vincent Millay

Since the hibiscus is found around the world in warm to tropical zones, it is not surprising that photographs of them are posted on sites from various countries. A few of the links to some lovely photographs are shared here:

http://www.hibiscusmania.com/soins_generaux.htm fFance)

http://trop-hibiscus.com/ (beautiful tropical hib.)

http://www.hibiscus.org/species/hheterophyllus.php


German site with fotos


Mallows

The hibiscus is of the family: malvaceae or mallow and the genus: hibiscus. The origin of the word, hibiscus, is from Latin from Greek, hibiskos marsh mallow.

This is an interesting grouping of plants. Although it is native to Europe and southeastern Africa it has found roots here in North America as well. Generally it is found in marshy areas often near the sea .

This is a woody, perennial, coming back year after year, beautifying the landscape when it blooms once again.

The Althaea officinalis was the original source of the marshmallow (you know, the ones we like to skewer and flame and devour). Another edible mallow, abelmoschus, is okra.

Cotton from which so many of our favorite clothes and bed coverings come from is from the genus gossypium which too is a relative of the hibiscus. Jute too is another product of this group of plant.

Other species are used to make beverages (soft drinks or tea), cosmetics, and some medicinal products.

Besides beauty, this lovely flower offers us more.

Happy Little Alice in Wonderland Flowers

January 3, 2013

It is now winter and my glorious hibsscus is still greeting me with its lovely face. Notice the color is now a pinkish hue rather than the vibrant red of the summer months.

Loveliness greeted me this third day of January 2013...

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January 12, 2013

We are having spring-like weather and these beauties greeted me this morning.
We are having spring-like weather and these beauties greeted me this morning. | Source

Waiting to Blossom

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This plant just keeps on giving

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A Variety of Blooms

Not surprisingly, the hibiscus is the state flower of Hawaii as it likes the tropical climate. The yellow hibiscus was selected in 1988 as the official state flower. No distinction in color was made prior to that time but the gorgeous yellow one was chosen to reign supreme according to 50states.com.

The hibiscus that we enjoy in our yards can display one of many faces. A few are:

  • single: five petals
  • crested single: five petals with extra petals that are known as petaloids
  • double: five petals with numerous petals coming out from the base
  • cup and saucer: five petals with petaloids arranged so that it gives the effect of a cup and saucer.

It is possible to grow your own new hibiscus by making cuttings of the woody portion of your mother plant. The step-by-step procedure is shown and explained at the link which follows. I have never tried this but plan to after viewing the explicit directions found at the site below.

Other important information including how to prune the roots is also provided at the same link.

Due to the fact that there are so many varieties of these glorious plants, they are found tucked in numerous areas throughout our world. Australia is home to many hibiscus that I only wish one day to have the opportunity to view up close and person.

In 997, a lovely hibiscus named Australia Remembers was shown to the world. It was so named to commemorate fiftieth anniversary of the end of World War I.

Seven weeks later...my best bloomers

Each day a new blossom more beautiful than the last greets me. That is my Honeybee in the background holding vigil I suppose or spying a tasty lizard.
Each day a new blossom more beautiful than the last greets me. That is my Honeybee in the background holding vigil I suppose or spying a tasty lizard. | Source
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This plant just keeps giving and giving

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tropical hibiscus (Rosa-silensis)
hardy hibiscus ( hibiscus syriacus)
flower (size)
3-6 inch blooms (hybrid: 1- inch)
(up to) 12 inch
flower (color)
varied: scarlet, orange, yellow, white
raspberryish, hot pink, mauve, rose, plum
leaves
dark green, glosy
medium green, heart shaped (or large lobed)
zone
9-10
4-9
light
full sun or partial sun
full sun
 
 
 

Soni2006 and Erin Gorney share hibiscus with us.

Soni2006 has written about the hibiscus's beneftis which is very informative. You will also find out where to purchase the hibiscus extract on line.

http://soni2006.hubpages.com/hub/medicinal-benefits-of-hibiscus-where-to-buy-hibiscus-extract-online


Erin Gorney has written a most informative hub on the variety of ways we can use the hibiscus. I had no idea so am excited to share this with you.

http://eringorney.hubpages.com/hub/Hibiscus-Oil-How-it-can-help-you



Never too many

My goal is to once again have an abundance of these lovelies welcoming all who chance to spy them as they pass my little corner of the world. My motto regarding these plants is that you can never have too many. The choices are almost limitless. The range of color, the sizes, the bloom style and the hardiness (tropical or hardy) are possibilities for you to explore. Hybrids have been developed and are being developed as this is being composed.

If you are not familiar with these plants, go to your neighborhood nursery for your best view of them. You may also catch a glimpse of them in your neighbor's yard. On line you can view many as well but seeing them in person is the best way to see how truly beautiful they are.

Beyond the fact that they really are exotic like the bromeliad is of which I have written, they are easy care plants. You can almost plant them and forget them. Except you will not do that because you will be adoring them so often as they are quite intoxicating. Just know which type of plant you have, tropical or hardy, so when it is cooler you are prepared to take necessary precautions to insure a safe transition to the cold months.

You will find these are a welcome addition to the lovely plants that you have chosen to give a home in your yard.


2 Monthsafter the First Pictures Were Taken, Spectacular Blooms Almost Daily

I had to include this one with the sun mottling the blossom...
I had to include this one with the sun mottling the blossom... | Source
just gets better and better. The plants are now on the porch for the winter. It is now November 8 2012
just gets better and better. The plants are now on the porch for the winter. It is now November 8 2012 | Source

Grow hibiscus from cuttings

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Growing hibiscus from cuttings

To grow hibiscus from cuttings:

  • Remove a branch from the Mother plant.
  • Remove leaves and cut the base at an angle.
  • Place in pot with potting soil mixed with vermiculite.
  • Keep moist and warm
  • In about ten days leaves sprout.
  • These (pictured) are just getting their first leaves.

Do you grow hibiscus from cuttings?

See results without voting

More to know

If you would like to know some unusual uses for the hibsiscus, greasy.com has a number of those to share. One of them is that adding the leaves to your bathwater will soften your nature and help rid you of any negativity towards others. I wonder if it will keep those feelings from creeping in at all.

There is so much to learn and know and discover about this plant. I have discovered so much by investigating one of my favorite plants. There is so much more I have to learn.

© 2012 Patricia Scott

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Comments 27 comments

pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 20 months ago from sunny Florida Author

Hi AuFait

Love my hisbiscus...Last year they did not bloom...they were burned badly in the winter and while they had gorgeous green leaves, no blooms came. This spring they are looking very happy and healthy; they made it through with out much damage this most recent winter so I am hoping for gorgeous blooms.

Thanks for the votes. I appreciate your visits.

Angels are once again on the way to you ps


Au fait profile image

Au fait 20 months ago from North Texas

What beautiful photos! So good to know these plants can be propagated through cuttings. Lots of good information here for people who are now thinking about getting their yards ready for summer and wanting to add something new .

Voted up, BUI, pinned to my 'Trees, Plants, and Flowers' board. Sharing with followers.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 2 years ago from sunny Florida Author

I am not sure if that would work or not. I brought mine in last year and they of course were great this year.

It just depends on the winter but I have to leave them outside this year so I am using the gardener's blanket from Lowe's. I hope it works.

Easy Exercise, thanks for visiting.

Angels are on the way to you this morning. ps


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Thanks, Sheila. I do so love them. I think I am going to get a hibiscus tree this year. My plants from last year are coming back but not so fast. There is lots of green but I won't have any blooms till late summer. there is just something so breathtaking about these blooms.

Nice to see you this evening Angels are on the way :)ps


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Thanks, Sheila. I do so love them. I think I am going to get a hibiscus tree this year. My plants from last year are coming back but not so fast. There is lots of green but I won't have any blooms till late summer. there is just something so breathtaking about these blooms.

Nice to see you this evening Angels are on the way :)ps


sgbrown profile image

sgbrown 3 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

Your hibiscus are just beautiful! I planted a hardy hibiscus in one of my flower beds several years ago and was afraid it would not come back as we have very cold winters here. It has come back each year, bigger and better than before. I plan on planting another one this year in a different location. They are really one of my favorites with those huge "dinner plate" sized blooms! :)


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Hi Backwater Sage....I do so understand your daughter's admiration of the hibiscus. These I have are the BEST I have ever had. Honestly, two or three times a week I have a new fabulous bloom . Thank you for the kind words...these blooms make them easy to photograph them well. I will be over to visit soon. Thank you for stopping by.


Backwater Sage profile image

Backwater Sage 4 years ago from Old Elbow Creek

Your photos are terrific. This is my youngest daughter's favorite flower. You can't have too many of them in your yard. I love the way they come back after a freeze. It seems like we get a couple good ones every year, now. That's why they quit growing pineapples for a cash crop around here.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Hello, Again...butterflystar...

These really and truly are one of my favorites. There are much more exotic plants out there and I have some of those too which I will write about later but the hibiscus never fails me. These are amazing. They just keep blooming. I went out and found another new bloom today. This is about six weeks of constant blooms.

Thank you for stopping by.


butterflystar profile image

butterflystar 4 years ago from A Place of Success :)

I love these flowers :)


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Steph72...O, I am sorry to hear you have not had good luck with these lovely plants. Maybe you can try again and have pleasant results. The biggest issue I have had is keeping them alive when the winters are very cold and the plants are too big to bring inside. Give it a try again just one more time. You never know.


Steph72 profile image

Steph72 4 years ago from Sunny Fl

my absolute fav flower however i kill every single one i bring home .. so sad I would have a yard full


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Hi, Eiddwen...O, lucky you. I have these on my steps right now. And plant to get more as time goes by. I am negotiating to buy the house I am living in so do not want to get more than I can carry if we can not agree on the terms.

These particular hibiscus have bloomed and bloomed and bloomed. I am enjoying them so much.

So glad you stopped by; I will be over to visit very soon.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Hi, Eiddwen...O, lucky you. I have these on my steps right now. And plant to get more as time goes by. I am negotiating to buy the house I am living in so do not want to get more than I can carry if we can not agree on the terms.

These particular hibiscus have bloomed and bloomed and bloomed. I am enjoying them so much.

So glad you stopped by; I will be over to visit very soon.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

We grow these on our patio and they really are beautiful.

Thanks for sharing and enjoy your day.

Eddy.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

starstream....O she is so smart. I moved 2 of mine inside last year but but the others were in pots that were too heavy to move. If that happens again, I will dig them out of the pot and bring in and repot for the winter I lost a lot in our cold winter last year (cold is a relative term as I am in Florida.)

Thank you for stopping by ...I will be over to visit soon.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

starstream....O she is so smart. I moved 2 of mine inside last year but but the others were in pots that were too heavy to move. If that happens again, I will dig them out of the pot and bring in and repot for the winter I lost a lot in our cold winter last year (cold is a relative term as I am in Florida.)

Thank you for stopping by ...I will be over to visit soon.


starstream profile image

starstream 4 years ago from Northern California

I have enjoyed these beautiful plants too. They were my mom's favorite. She had at least 6 that she moved indoors when the Northern winter arrived.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

sen.sush23...O my...to me they are anything but common. They are fabulous in their generosity as they share their beautiful blooms day after day. I only have two right now because I lost many many last winter. I am adding new ones, different ones this year a little bit at a time. These two that I have photographed are the best I have ever had. They bloom and bloom and bloom. I have changed photos several times since I published this.

And yes you can add this to share, I would be flattered. And I will share yours in mine. Thank you for stopping by.


sen.sush23 profile image

sen.sush23 4 years ago from Kolkata, India

Patricia, as I am from a tropical country, hibiscus is way too common a garden plant to excite anybody. But my parents somehow loved this plant and were enthusiastic to keep looking for new varieties. Except for the red, five petal or multiple petals, the other colors are at times difficult to grow and get to flower. They seem to sense how genuine you are in your love for them! We have a white five petal, a little smaller in size than the red ones; a pale yellow one, with a red centre halo all around on the petals, a purple multiple florets, a large orange yellow variety- and also the red one, similar to your photograph. We also have a variety that really looks like small red pepper (not bell pepper)...and they bloom in a thick cluster. If I can, I will share the photographs in a hub and link you to it. Great write and please continue to share your enthusiasm about plants with us. Voted up and sharing.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Cyndi10... These are some of the best plants I have ever had. Each morning for the last week I have gone out to find a breathtaking bloom waiting for me to adore it. The blooms are so large and the color so vibrant this year. I am so thrilled with them.

Thank you for stopping by.


Cyndi10 profile image

Cyndi10 4 years ago from Georgia

One of my favorite flowers. I've never been able to keep them from summer to summer. Your pictures are lovely, and you gave good tips. Thanks.


Mhatter99 profile image

Mhatter99 4 years ago from San Francisco

Dramatic and beautiful plant, even when it is not flowering. Thanks for sharing.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Rtalloni....If I ever move to another state, I know I will drag mine along or definitely will find some as soon as possible to plant. One of the reason that I like them so much is that they are so showy but are not high maintenance at all. What a great combination that is. Thank you for stopping by again.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida Author

Rtalloni....If I ever move to another state, I know I will drag mine along or definitely will find some as soon as possible to plant. One of the reason that I like them so much is that they are so showy but are not high maintenance at all. What a great combination that is. Thank you for stopping by again.


RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

Hibiscus are marvelous plants. I miss seeing them since moving from Florida to the Carolinas. Enjoy planning and planting your new ones!


rutley profile image

rutley 4 years ago from South Jersey

LOVE those plants too. I have regular and tropical varieties. I bring them in each winter also because I just can't bear to let them die. They look a bit beat up and yellowed before spring but snap right back to life after a few weeks outside. Nice hub! Voted up!

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