The Amish Made Little Dutch Maid Hand Crank Kitchen Machine Put to the test.

The Little Dutch Hand Crank Kitchen Machine
The Little Dutch Hand Crank Kitchen Machine
Heavy duty construction American made like they made things in the 50s and 60s
Heavy duty construction American made like they made things in the 50s and 60s
Heavy duty powder coated base stays in place on the counter and is easy to store
Heavy duty powder coated base stays in place on the counter and is easy to store
Simple two speed crank system for high and low speeds
Simple two speed crank system for high and low speeds
The Little Dutch Maid Standard Equipment
The Little Dutch Maid Standard Equipment
Heavy duty beater whisk
Heavy duty beater whisk
Optional shredder and food processor
Optional shredder and food processor
Low RPM slices vegetables clean with little effort on the crank
Low RPM slices vegetables clean with little effort on the crank
The Little Dutch Maid making the bread dough
The Little Dutch Maid making the bread dough

We wanted to first hand witness why this off-grid mixer has become so popular in so many modern day kitchens

We put the popular Amish made Little Dutch Maid Hand Crank Mixer to the test. We wanted to first hand witness why this off-grid mixer has become so popular in so many modern day kitchens, even at the price point of a heavy duty electric mixer.

Right out of the box we could quickly feel and see that this little mixer is built like a tank. In fact we haven’t seen anything come out of an American factory built this heavy and tough since the 50’s and 60’s. Just tapping the knuckles on the base is like tapping on a commercial kitchen mixer.

The thick Stainless Steel drive assembly and the chrome plated thick hand crank tell the story or why this mixer is meant to stay around the kitchen for a long time to come.

You can feel the smoothness of the heavy gear assembly as you crank the mixer. By not having the brushes and armature to wear out in an electric motor the base on this mixer should last for maybe even another generation.

Moving the crank from low to high speed is very simple and easy, the arrows clearly show the direction to crank.

We were a little skeptical of why the Amish would go to all of this work but use a plastic bowl, well that too became obvious to see the Bosh quality displayed in our hands. The bowl is thick and made of a flexible plastic material much like other mixing bowls so that will bounce off the floor if dropped. Even the bowl has replaceable parts, and is very easy to clean.

The dough hook that comes with the mixer is also very heavy duty, as well as the mixing whisk and drive assembly.

The drive assembly for the whisk and the optional cookie paddles is very simple, it uses the Bosh poly gears driven off a built in gear at the top of the mixing bowl. The whisk snaps out for easy and quick cleaning.

The Amish have truly built this as a commercial grade mixer, it was designed to mix large batches of mashed potatoes, and other mixes for large Amish gatherings. The heavy duty dough hook makes several loaves of bread at a time.

By adding the optional slicer shredder the Little Dutch Maid transforms into a full kitchen processor taking to place of a separate mixer and food processor.

Our first item to process was a cake mix, the two speed gear assembly allowed us to speed up the beater whisk without the need to crank any faster. We were amazed at just how quick our cake mix was done with just a few effortless cranks.

We also appreciated the top load convenience and the two piece splash guard and lid assembly. On our standup electric mixer it seems to be a struggle trying to pour in or adding eggs, flour and other ingredients because the motor assembly hogs up so much space.

We quickly converted over to the food processor the bowel assembly. Like the mixing bowel it sits down and twists to lock into place. It does take some coordination at first to align the groves and the slotted inner drive assembly to line up with the base, but after a few times the process of changing the assemblies out became easier as we learned to grab the top of the spindle and twist it at the same time as setting down and twisting the assembly on to the hub.

The food processor top is just like our electrical one, except being non electric we didn’t have to worry about making sure the electrical interlock was properly aligned each time we remove the bowl. This is a common frustration for us in using the electric models, as our old one did the same. In fact it was one of the first areas to crack on the bowl assembly, and because it was no longer being made we had to purchase a new Kitchen Aide one.

Our first test was to slice some yellow squash. Two of the three slicer and shredder blades are reversible so that you can choose either thick or thin slices, or coarse of fine shredding. We choose the think slicer for our squash.

The blade turned easily with no extra effort on the crank even when cutting hard vegetables such as carrots. We also noticed how clean and uniform the slices were. The slower RPMs seemed to not mangle the slices as our professional electric food processor does. We followed with some green peppers and onion with the same even sliced outcomes.

We decided to put the shredder blade to the test with making some cabbage slaw. Like all food choppers you still have to quarter the head of cabbage to fit into the top, but again with little effort on the hand crank the bowl quickly filled up and we were finished.

We were very impressed how well the base of the Little Dutch Maid Mixer stays on the cabinet top. The weight and the rubber feet keep it solid in place allowing you to crank with one hand and feed with the other. Yet the base is still small and compact that it can be picked up and stored on a shelf.

Both of our electric stand mixer and food processor are very heavy to lift and maneuver over to our kitchen island. In fact unless we just have a large batch to do we usually end up doing it buy hand anyway as it is just not worth the hassle to uncover move them over and then have to clean and put them back. We can see why the Little Dutch Maid can be so useful in any kitchen regardless if you are trying to live off gird or not.

Our next and the most ultimate test was to make bread dough from scratch. Again the open top design makes it easy to add more flour to stiffen it up as you go. We started off with the whisk as they seemed to beat the ingredients together faster than the dough hook, as the dough began to stiffen up we switched over the dough hook, and like before the hand crank process stayed smooth.

Towards the end we did have to have one hand on the base as we cranked to finish the dough. We didn’t have to apply pressure; it was more to keep the base from pulling toward us as we made the cranking revolutions.

With the bowl assembly locked down we didn’t have to worry about holding the bowl at the same time, so just unless the kids want to get involved one person can comfortably work this machine to even make bread. Our mix yielded three loaves. The Amish make larger batches but say towards the end they take the mix out and finish the dough by hand.

You can purchase The Little Dutch Maid Mixer at this link on the Cottage Craft Works site.

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Comments 1 comment

lisa.bom 4 years ago

My husband and I have been looking for kitchen gadgets that use no electricity. We live in the mountains of Colorado and frequently lose power. This is on our list of things to purchase. Thank you for sharing.

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