How to get rid of Blossom End Rot Tomato Disease.

Calcium deficiency

Your soil probably has adequate calcium. Remove them and there should be no problem with the next tomatoes.
Your soil probably has adequate calcium. Remove them and there should be no problem with the next tomatoes. | Source

Common and easily solved

If you've ever worked a Master Gardener Hotline or been the Plant Doctor at the Flower Lawn and Garden Show, you can answer Blossom-end rot questions without looking.

There will come a time in your life when you would swear that every single tomato grower in the Heartland has asked – and you have graciously answered their question, “What is Blossom End Rot?” and “How do I get rid of it?”

Just when you think everyone with a garden knows the answer, it's another season, there's another garden and someone else asks, “Now what did you say about blossom end rot?” and “How do I get rid of it?”

Blossom-end rot happens when we start with a wet tomato growing season but then - just as fruit is setting - the soil becomes too dry.

Blossom-end rot is a calcium imbalance. But chances are, you have plenty of calcium in your well-kept vegetable bed. The excess rain has bound up the calcium in the soil and your plant can not get enough of it. The cause is extreme fluctuations in the garden's moisture level.

It's ugly and I've seen it happen to bell peppers too. The best advice is to remove the offending fruit, keep the soil moisture constant. Problem solved.


All tomatoes can get end rot

usually time is the best solution. When soil and air temps warm up and dry out, the problem is gone.
usually time is the best solution. When soil and air temps warm up and dry out, the problem is gone. | Source

Summer gets hotter

Soil gets drier, mulch helps regulate the water in the soil.

If soil is way too wet or too dry, the problem will return. Try to keep the soil evenly moist. If you have just gone nuts and over fertilized the garden, added too much nitrogen, there is high salt content, root damage from over zealous cultivation (hoeing), or extreme pH levels will contribute to the problem.

Wait until the ground is warm enough to plant your tomatoes. Cold soil limits nutrient uptake. Wait till days are 60 degrees before planting tomatoes. Otherwise, they sit there and refuse to grow.

Tomatoes like neutral (7.0) to slightly acid soil 6.5) They can absorb nutrients best when the soil pH is 6.5 to 7.0.

If you feel compelled to doctor your plants, there are products that will solve your calcium deficiency.

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Comments 4 comments

Patsy Bell 4 years ago

One of my favorite cherry-size tomatoes are the red pear and yellow pear. Just 1 or 1 1/2 inches tall. So sweet, I usually eat the first few right off the vine,standing in the garden.


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moonlake 4 years ago from America

I like hairloom and we always buy early girl. We have such a short season. We plant roma, patio and grape. I love the little ones just put a bowl on the table it's like eating candy.


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Patsybell 4 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO Author

Have you decided what kind of tomatoes to grow this year?


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moonlake 4 years ago from America

Hey, you answered a few questions about our tomato problems that we had last year. Good Hub.

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    Patsy Bell Hobson (Patsybell)214 Followers
    113 Articles

    I inherited my love of gardening from mother and grandmother. I am a garden blogger, freelance writer, Master Gardener emeritus.



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