Top 5 Things You Didn’t Know About Granite Countertops

A thriving economy usually means job creation, and job creation usually means population growth. Population growth, in turn, translates into thriving real estate markets, which in turn mean that sellers have the advantage in the market. High demand for homes means that home values will be on the rise, but it also means that the demand for remodeling contractors and materials will likewise be on the incline. If you wish to remodel your home, it is a good time to do it. Materials are slowly getting more expensive, so now is an excellent time to complete the home improvement projects you have wanted to accomplish, like installing granite countertops. According to our Asheville fabricators, the demand for labor and materials is rising and in turn pushing the prices of such jobs much higher, so take advantage while you can of the to put in granite countertops and tile floors.

If you are going to undertake such a project, you should be informed about granite. As demands and prices for the material rises, you may find shady dealers who try to take advantage of you. Staying informed about granite will help you select a high quality slab that you will love. Toward that end, we compiled a list of a few of the least known facts about granite.

  • No two slabs are alike - Granite slabs vary tremendously in color, hardness, and crystal composition. The many factors involved in creating a granite slab create this tremendous variety. Different ages, formations locations, and soil compositions make the appearance of granite differ from slab to slab. Because of this, you should always pick out the granite you like in person, not from a picture, and base the rest of the kitchen around it, selecting tiles and paint colors that highlight the features of the granite.
  • Granite is mildly radioactive - We mention this here because you are likely to hear horror stories about the radon emission from granite, and it needs to be debunked. While it is true that granite does emit a miniscule amount of radon, it has been shown to be completely harmless. Don’t be surprised down the road when someone tells you this. While it is true, granite is demonstrably less radioactive than soil or mud.
  • Blue and red are the rarest granites - In case anyone tells you otherwise. If you find a blue or red slab, you may pay a premium price for it. But most sand or rust colored slabs should be much more affordable.
  • Granite is a very tough material - Essentially the only thing that will scratch your granite top is your diamond ring. This doesn’t mean you should cut directly on the surface, however. This may be safe for the slab, but it will tear up your knives pretty bad. Probably it is still best to use a cutting board.
  • Granite should be sealed to last - While it is true that the stone is extremely hard, you still want to keep unwanted moisture out by sealing your countertop, ideally once a year. This isn’t tricky: have your stone fabricator recommend the best sealant for your stone and follow their instructions, or have them do it for you. While granite isn’t nearly as porous as some other stones, it is not completely pore free either, and liquids can eventually weaken the stone. With a proper seal, however, the stone should last much longer than the house it is in.

  • Granite is a very tough material - Essentially the only thing that will scratch your granite top is your diamond ring. This doesn’t mean you should cut directly on the surface, however. This may be safe for the slab, but it will tear up your knives pretty bad. Probably it is still best to use a cutting board.
  • Granite should be sealed to last - While it is true that the stone is extremely hard, you still want to keep unwanted moisture out by sealing your countertop, ideally once a year. This isn’t tricky: have your stone fabricator recommend the best sealant for your stone and follow their instructions, or have them do it for you. While granite isn’t nearly as porous as some other stones, it is not completely pore free either, and liquids can eventually weaken the stone. With a proper seal, however, the stone should last much longer than the house it is in.

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LydiaBlogg 3 years ago from New England

Nice article. I would like to say, however, that I've read numerous times that the granite found in the US in relatively harmless, the granite that is imported can be highly radioactive.

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