Under Counter Can Openers

History

Canned food was invented in the early days of the nineteenth century for the british army. Made of solid of iron, the cans were usually heavier than the fold they held.

The inventor, Peter Durand, figured out how to seal food into cans but never really thought about how to get it out again. Soldiers usually used their bayonets or even rocks to open the cans to get to the food.

Only in the 1860's, when thinner steel cans came into use, could the can opener be invented. The first one was invented and patented by Ezra Warner and looked like a bent bayonet with a large curved blade. Although the first can opener was only used in the grocery store, where clerks had to open the cans before it could be taken away.

Under Counter Can Openers

The modern can opener was invented by William Lyman about ten years after the original can opener. The only change was the introduction of a serrated rotation wheel, but the basic principle continues to be used on the modern can openers.

Nowadays can openers are found in every tipe of kitchen. From the good old manual can opener, to simple electric can openers used for opening standard size cans of food, or yet industrial size can openers found in restaurants. There is a can opener for any type of culinary setting.

Under Counter Can Openers, also know as Under the Cabinet Can Openers, can be manual or electric, but its main advantage is the fact that you always know were to find it, since they are fixed to a cabinet and can not be moved away.

Attaching under the counter can openers under a cabinet or counter is also a good way to save space.

They are considered as the most practical can openers you can find on the marked.

Comments 1 comment

Itswritten profile image

Itswritten 6 years ago from Detroit, Michigan

Wow I was getting tired of using the one you turn with your hand if I buy this under the counter can opener It would be a great way to not have to take the can opener in and out of the cabinet its already mounted out of the way .

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