Using Color Psychology for a Relaxing Bedroom D├ęcor

The Color Blue

Blue is a cool and refreshing color. It is present in the sea and the sky, covering vast territories and tinting our atmosphere. Interestingly, the default background color of early word processors was blue -- it helped relax the eyes and ease some of that strain of constantly looking at a computer screen. Even today many software interfaces employ it as their main color.

Blue's most common effect is that of relaxation. It suppresses overheated emotions, enveloping people in a cloak of primordial calm. Perhaps it reminds us that all life sprung from water and we are all still part of the giant ocean. The meat and potatoes of many artists, blue is immensely versatile and adaptable, appearing in hundreds of tones and covering a wide range of emotions.

Pablo Picasso

Picasso's "blue period" is a fascinating moment in art history. Shocked by the loss of a close friend, the young artist descended into deep sadness -- the blues -- producing numerous paintings using almost exclusively the color blue. These works of art are all touched by a nostalgic sweetness and airy melancholia; sometimes, after seeing one, all I want to do is lie on the bed, stare at the ceiling and just breathe, thinking about nothing. The strangest thing is that afterwards I would feel relieved, as if having traveled to a remote quiet location... Picasso is justifiably touted as one of the most important artists of the 20th century. His paintings The Old Guitarist, The Tragedy and The Blue Nude are among his best known works.

Georgia O'Keeffe

Georgia O'Keeffe developed a unique style by mixing figurative subjects -- mostly flowers -- with abstract elements. As a result, many of her works possess an overpowering flowing quality. It is as if she tried to capture the continuous movement and growth in nature. Her blue paintings are especially harmonious, because the color is so common in nature and readily associates with motion -- for instance, in sea waves . My favorites include From The Lake I, Blue River and the Blue Morning Glories.

Claude Monet

The man who brought impressionism to the forefront of painting explored blue when creating his water lilies series. Monet's blue can be no less than exhilarating -- although it would be difficult to attach such a "hot" description to such a cool color. Nevertheless, his ponds arrest one's attention with their rich, saturated hues. The whitish-pinkish lilies provide a nice distraction when they eye gets restless.

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glassvisage profile image

glassvisage 8 years ago from Northern California

I love reading about ways to change the look and feel of a room... Color is such a powerful tool! I personally love light green myself...


Elijah S profile image

Elijah S 8 years ago from Europe Author

Duly noted..:) I plan to add tips on green, but also on orange, brown, purple, black&white and maybe even gray.

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