When to Use Pots to Plant Vegetables

Clay pots make suitable homes for vegetables in a potted garden.
Clay pots make suitable homes for vegetables in a potted garden.

The rewarding experience of growing your own vegetables manifests itself at the time of harvest. Fresh, crisp vegetables -- crunchy and nutritious -- gives you the best food, straight from the soil. Just being able to plant seeds in the soil is a blessing, and if you have a plot of land -- small or big -- use it to plant vegetables. But if your outdoor space limits the available to a deck, patio, terrace or a sunny window, as long as the shining sun and fresh air reaches your growing space, it is a place suitable for planting.

Winter is the time for planting veggies indoors.
Winter is the time for planting veggies indoors. | Source

Before the Growing Season

If you live a region that has a short growing season, get a headstart on your garden by planting your vegetables in pots. Select a window in the house that receives a lot of sunlight, and add a few plant grow lights to enhance the vegetables' light exposure. Plant the vegetables by seed, or purchase seedlings to start your garden. Water and nurture the plants regularly until the danger of frost passes. Then prepare the soil outside, and transplant the vegetables to the garden.

Grow vegetables in pots when planning a move.
Grow vegetables in pots when planning a move. | Source

When Moving

If want to grow a vegetable garden but are planning to move in the spring or summer, start your vegetables in pots. Plants, much like people, experience stress during a move. Rather than plant the vegetables in the garden only to uproot them later on, the pots offer the mobility and stability the plants need during the move. After settling in your new home and preparing the soil to grow vegetables, transplant them from the pots into your new garden.

A hardscape garden makes an ideal setting for potted vegetables.
A hardscape garden makes an ideal setting for potted vegetables. | Source

Potted Vegetables Add Design Flair to Garden Settings

Hardscape gardens make outdoor living virtually maintenance-free. The downside - a shortage of greenery with its varying textures and colors. More than just an improvisation, smart placements of potted vegetables, plants and flowers actually define specialty landscape designs.

In a Hardscape Garden

If you have a yard but no soil -- as in a completely paved outdoor room or a dry landscape of pebbles, rocks and boulders -- then potted vegetable plants introduces both the softness of added greenery and edible picks to enjoy right outside your door. Play around with the placement of your potted vegetable garden to get the best layout and sunlight exposure for the plants.

Vegetable Planter | Flower Planter | Outdoor Planters - Self Watering Red Planter Box by Monkey Pots!
Vegetable Planter | Flower Planter | Outdoor Planters - Self Watering Red Planter Box by Monkey Pots! | Source

On a Deck, Patio, or Terrace

Even when outdoor space is limited to a deck, patio or a terrace, pots offer a portable garden to grow vegetables. If you have just enough space for the pots, then you have enough space to grow your own vegetables. Even for small outdoor spaces, pots add height, curves, dimension and texture, and with the addition of live plants, they shine as decorative, outdoor accents. Placement is important for flow and aesthetic appeal. Soften the corners of the space by placing a collection of pots, or outline its perimeter with a row of pots.

Growing vegetables in pots and in tight spaces is not something new. In traditional civilizations in the Americas, Africa, and Asia, farmers are known for developing hillsides into cultivated, terraced gardens. These gardens barely had enough room for one person to pass.

Source

In a Sunny Window

When outdoor gardening is not an option, utilize the blessing of a well-lit, sunny window to grow your vegetables. Just like starting your garden indoors, the only difference is the vegetables will grow to maturity indoors. Soil nutrients and aeration, adequate watering, and proper lighting are essential to a successful indoor garden.

If you have or can install a bay window or even a solarium, then that is even better, but for those who cannot, use the brightest, sunniest window as a home for your veggies. And don't forget to open the window often to freshen the air and make your vegetable plants happy.

Which scenario defines where or why you would grow vegetables in pots?

  • It's still cold outside, but want to get a jumpstart on gardening.
  • Want vegetables to dress up and soften the lines of my hardscape setting.
  • Have a deck, patio, or terrace that can use some vegetative company.
  • Have to move, but do not want to miss the growing season.
  • My growing space for vegetables is my favorite sunny window.
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Comments 11 comments

DonnaCosmato profile image

DonnaCosmato 4 years ago from USA

Good tips and advice on the benefits of container gardening! I especially liked the picture of the pot in the cutaway window; that's a clever idea. Voted up


Naima Manal profile image

Naima Manal 4 years ago from NY Author

Thank you very much, DonnaCosmato. Container gardening really makes it easy for anyone to eat fresh vegetables!


Talullah profile image

Talullah 4 years ago from SW France

Some lovely ideas here; a great hub!


thougtforce profile image

thougtforce 4 years ago from Sweden

Great tips about container gardening! I have a big patio that could really need some pots with vegetables! Voted up, useful

Tina


Naima Manal profile image

Naima Manal 4 years ago from NY Author

Thank you very much, Talullah. I really like plants and gardening.


Naima Manal profile image

Naima Manal 4 years ago from NY Author

Potted vegetables and plants will soften the hardscape of your patio as beautiful accents. Thank you very much!


Bedbugabscond profile image

Bedbugabscond 4 years ago from United States

I tried to start a garden in my yard. It turns out the soil is not healthy enough to support flowers, never the less food. I am going to begin planting in pots. How do you feel about the hanging pots which grow vegetables, such as tomatoes, do they work well?


Naima Manal profile image

Naima Manal 4 years ago from NY Author

Thank you for your comment, Bedbugabscond. Yes, hanging pots work very well for tomatoes and other veggies. Having the vegetables grow through the bottom of the bag or container puts them in the right place to get the most water as it soaks down through the soil. You can make your own bags using tarps (cut a square, fold in half, stitch along the side, and gather the top and bottom), or use 5-gallon buckets with a hole in the bottom. Of course there are many ways to be creative in growing plants in pots and off the ground -- the basic concept is, if it can hold soil and receive direct sunlight, then you're good to go. Thanks for stopping by!


Rizky 21 months ago

I appreciate your kind and geeunors advice a lot!. I have been trying it hardly and did not get those amazing results!. It is nice to see that you got my comment in a good way!God bless you!VA:F [1.9.10_1130]please wait VA:F [1.9.10_1130](from 0 votes)


Lorraine 21 months ago

Halellujah! I needed this-you're my savior.


Marden 20 months ago

Well done to think of sonimhetg like that

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