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Would you build a house without an engineer?

  1. grand old lady profile image90
    grand old ladyposted 3 months ago

    Far too often I see people in the Philippines scrimping on expenses to build their first house by not consulting an engineer. They believe that an architect is sufficient.

    Do you believe a house can be built with just an architect, or would you insist on hiring an engineer too? Why?

    1. wilderness profile image96
      wildernessposted 3 months ago in reply to this

      Without bragging, I could build a house without either an engineer OR an architect.

      Of course, it might not be pretty or particularly useful in my lifestyle, it might fall down at the first heavy wind or the roof might collect water instead of shedding it, but I could build one.

      Having been in the building trades for many years, there is a definite place for both, and they cannot fill the duties of the other.

      1. grand old lady profile image90
        grand old ladyposted 3 months ago in reply to this

        ah wilderness, you made me lol, you are so funny! I appreciate your sharing of your expertise. In the Philippines there are architects who claim to do both, and it is happens more plentifully than I expected.

        1. wilderness profile image96
          wildernessposted 3 months ago in reply to this

          Well, if Frank Lloyd Wrights works so often need engineering remediation (and they do) then I wouldn't trust anyone else to try to do both jobs.  Not without two college degrees hanging on their wall, anyway.

          "A good example of the need for structural remediation can be found in Mr. Wright’s riverside masterpiece, Falling Water. The iconic cantilevered portions of the home had at one point deflected close to seven-inches over their fifteen foot span, and analysis of the structure has revealed that the as-built design had placed these cantilevers dangerously close to their failure limits. Post-tensioning was eventually required to restore these portions back to their intended elevation and to prevent the sort of catastrophic collapse deemed inevitable "

          http://news.asce.org/frank-lloyd-wright … -engineer/

          1. grand old lady profile image90
            grand old ladyposted 3 months ago in reply to this

            OHmigosh, Frank Lloyd Wright is such a genius! This is truly a learning experience to me, that his foundations weren't good, he must have worked without an engineer:(. Surprises, surprises, still I respect him as much as ever:). Thanks for the link to the article.

      2. IslandBites profile image85
        IslandBitesposted 3 months ago in reply to this

        LOL

        But is true. My dad built our family house by himself. Almost 30 years ago, and is still standing (even after multiples hurricanes).

        (Unfortunately) is common practice here, when people dont have enough $$. Not everybody is as good as my dad. lol

        1. grand old lady profile image90
          grand old ladyposted 3 months ago in reply to this

          IslandBites, I am so happy for you that your Dad built a strong house for your family. To think, it has even withstood so many hurricanes. You guys are really fortunate:)

    2. Live to Learn profile image81
      Live to Learnposted 3 months ago in reply to this

      It is important to have a structural engineer sign off on a structure which is far outside of the norm. However, simple structures are fine if you have any common sense.

      1. grand old lady profile image90
        grand old ladyposted 3 months ago in reply to this

        I agree with you that definitely, you need an engineer for structures that are really complicated. For simple structures, I really admire people like the father of IslandBites who successfully built a strong, solid house on their own. I have known someone who built a simple addition to his house, but after four years the walls started to crack. So if you do it so well, good for you:).

 
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