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Questions about lupines and snowdrops

  1. Anolinde profile image88
    Anolindeposted 6 years ago

    Hi!  Wow .. this doesn't look like a very popular forum tongue

    So, I have a few questions about snowdrops and lupines ..

    First, about my snowdrops.  The flowers have faded (I had already snipped them off) and the leaves are slowly turning yellow.  I would like to propagate them for next year, so what exactly do I do now, please?

    About my lupines, the flowers have pretty much faded as well and I would also like to propagate them for next year.  Should I cut back the stalks?  I read that they reseed themselves .. what does it mean by that?  Does it mean that I could just leave them be and that new lupines will grow next year naturally?  Or do I have to wait to collect the seeds myself and store them to plant them myself?  And what do I do with the side shoots?  Also, the flowers don't seem to be thriving .. what might be the problem?

    Sorry .. I'm a total beginner and I'm really struggling!  Thanks for any help/advice in advance!

    1. Jule Romans profile image88
      Jule Romansposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I will write a hub for you, Anolinde. I had many of the same questions when I was beginning, too. Don't worry. Just keep reading, learning, and experimenting.

      Also, remember that lupines are awesome choices for the home garden. The wild blue lupine is a host plant for the endangered Karner Blue butterfly. It also is a host for at least five other butterflies that like the same things the Karner Blue likes.

      1. Anolinde profile image88
        Anolindeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks, Jule! smile

  2. Bob Ewing profile image53
    Bob Ewingposted 6 years ago

    You can let the lupines drop their seed and new plants will grow. Lupines are very prolific and will take over, so I suggest you remove most of the seed heads before they shed the seeds. leave a few on the plant. You may find this site useful: http://www.wintersown.org/wseo1/Lupine_Seeds.html

    1. Anolinde profile image88
      Anolindeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks, Bob!  I'll go have a look smile

    2. Jule Romans profile image88
      Jule Romansposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I love wintersown.org!

  3. IzzyM profile image85
    IzzyMposted 6 years ago

    Snowdrops are normally propagated by bulbs, though you can wait until the seed head fully forms and dies off on the plant. Leave the seeds in a dry place at the bottom of the fridge for a couple of months and sow round about Sept/Nov, but if they grow it'll be a few years before you get flowers.
    If you wait until your snowdrops have died down completely - no green left on them at all (they need the green to feed the bulb up for next year's display), then lift the bulbs, you should see some little offshoot bulblets growing beside the bigger ones. They can be replanted elsewhere.

    Lupins are perennial normally, but you do get annual varieties too. Leave the stalks etc to die off naturally unless they are annuals in which case you may wish to save the seed heads for planting next spring.

    1. Anolinde profile image88
      Anolindeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Just saw this.  Thanks, Izzy smile  One more question if you see this.  About the snowdrops, when I lift the bulbs and if there are bulblets, do I divide them and then replant them right away or do I store them to replant in the fall?  And why must they be replanted elsewhere?  Can't they be replanted in the same spot?  Sorry, noob questions tongue

 
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