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Are vinyl replacement windows really the best choice?

  1. Teddletonmr profile image79
    Teddletonmrposted 6 years ago

    I plan to replace the windows in my home that was built in 1976 using wood framed windows in metal tracks. Cold air just seems to pass through. What makes the best vinyl replacement windows better than the other options on the market?

    1. Cmbeverly profile image60
      Cmbeverlyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      They are better because they do not expand and contract with outside temperature or humidity fluctuations. Most modern windows have double pane construction which is two pieces of glass having a void between them. The void is filled with an inert (doesn't catch fire or cause harm) gas that aids in the prevention of outside temperatures affecting your home. They last longer and don't need to be replaced as often as wood framed windows thus they are more cost effective as well. Basically they are better but you don't get the charm of wooden window frames.

      1. Teddletonmr profile image79
        Teddletonmrposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Cmbeverly, thanks for the information on vinyl replacement windows. What skill level is required to replace my old 1976 wood frame Andersun windows.
        The windows I have, the wooden window frames slide in a thin metal track, where when the wind blows, passes right through the seals, or gaskets around the tracks and where the windows overlap each other.

    2. profile image60
      Roxxy Evansposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      The vinly windows are very good on energy efficiency as there is a lesser chance of cold air infiltration in the house through the vinyl windows. Take a look at some of the designs of vinyl windows at http://gtawindows.on.ca/showroom/windows so that all your questions regarding the vinyl windows are cleared.

  2. profile image70
    logic,commonsenseposted 6 years ago

    Use Anderson or Marvin windows if you plan to live there more than a year or two.
    It is a matter of quality.  The cheaper ones are not as tight fitting and have gaps that let in air.

    1. Teddletonmr profile image79
      Teddletonmrposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Gaps letting in cold air is the problem I am trying to fix, thanks for the heads up...

      1. Cmbeverly profile image60
        Cmbeverlyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Gaps are going to occur it's how windows are installed and you can only insulate properly and have good solid windows whether wood or vinyl. Replacing with vinyl or wood is still up to you. Windows are deceptively easy to replace and if you are a little handy you can easily do it yourself. A level and either a screw gun or hammer should do it for required tools. Honestly if you want awesome videos and tutorials about it then go to http://www.diynetwork.com/ I am addicted to this channel and their website is an awesome place to start when deciding on whether to hire out a project or try it yourself.

        1. Teddletonmr profile image79
          Teddletonmrposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Thanks for the helpful information,and link. I'll go check it out.

  3. BobbiRant profile image60
    BobbiRantposted 6 years ago

    We put in our own and we love them.  They are warm in winter and cool in summer and tilt in for easy cleaning.  They open like a dream too, we used to have wooden windows that would swell and stick.

    1. Teddletonmr profile image79
      Teddletonmrposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks for the tip, when it gets cold and damp the windows in my house will not open, as a matter of fact they are stuck close and will not open at all. However, a cold north west wind has no problem getting past the window seals.

 
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