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Any idea what the best plant or flowers in garden!!?

  1. hewhohn profile image67
    hewhohnposted 5 years ago

    I tired to use any plant and flowers to my ground, My ground is lot of space and I don't know what is the best thing to put there, so that any my friends who visit my house can make appreciate my ground or my garden!

    1. Ultimate Hubber profile image79
      Ultimate Hubberposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It will depend on how often you can water them and care for them. Other things to consider include: your climate, location of your garden(south, east...), soil etc.

      As you mentioned you have a lot of space then why not go for some palm trees? Any palm trees that can grow well in your climate can give your garden a great look.

    2. Barbara Kay profile image85
      Barbara Kayposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It depends on if the spot is sunny or not. If you are just a beginner gardener, try marigolds. They come in different heights and are an easy flower for a beginner.

      Petunias are good too, but take longer to mature. If you are buying plants, these are a good choice.

      Both petunias and marigolds are annuals, which mean they will not return the next year. If you want flowers that return every year, do a search for perennial flowers for your zone.

    3. manlypoetryman profile image69
      manlypoetrymanposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Believe it or not....a little planning can go a long ways for the long term enjoyment of your garden. Even the simplest garden needs a lot of tending. Look at what the other folks have posted. Region, climate, soil condition, and how ambitious a gardner you are...all come into play. I use flowering shrubs and fruit trees for my color in my yard because of the high-maintenance that flowers can be (even though my wife always wants more flowers!)...and I consider myself an avid gardener...but still don't want the continual work of re-planting flowers through the growing season! The ball is kind'a in your court. Look at what your neighbors are planting, go online and see what you would like for your own yard...that will grow, and consider what plants always do best in your area...as a start to a successful fun garden! Welcome to the wonderful world of gardening!

    4. 0
      CollBposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Hydrangeas are extremely versatile and lovely to see in a garden - as far as I've seen, they flower in springtime through to late summer and early autumn.  You can have hydrangea shrubs around the edges of the garden or by the back part of the wall leading out into the garden/patio and in ornate flower pots along the footpath or veranda area.

      Truly amazing plants and which makes the garden spectacularly vibrant.

    5. Mary Contrary profile image61
      Mary Contraryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      hewhohn, one tip my Grandmother and Mother handed down to me was to plant marigolds around the garden.  They give off a scent that repels some insects.

    6. tritrain profile image77
      tritrainposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Plant flowers that are native to your area.  Those would be the best.

    7. muslima61 profile image25
      muslima61posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      if you have a large expanse of land to cover then i find the flower mixes to be the best and gives the best coverage to start, until you have time to sort it out into beds etc, just dig lightly, rake over and scatter the seeds, don't forget to water regularly.. also any annuals will do well treated like this, easily found in your local garden centre.. wilkinsons etc. and they are very inexpensive .. happy gardening.

  2. findandshop profile image60
    findandshopposted 5 years ago

    I love my daisies. Shasta Daisies grow to be 2 ft. or more. Alaskan Daisies get to about 4 ft. tall and usually are white flowers. I have a yellow variety also They come back every year and you split them up every few years. I love my little field of Daisies.
    Slugs like them so some deterrent is required.

  3. paradigmsearch profile image90
    paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago

    Gophers! The Untold Story! smile

  4. hewhohn profile image67
    hewhohnposted 5 years ago

    Thanks guys!!

    1. cat on a soapbox profile image82
      cat on a soapboxposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Start small. Choose an area like your entry way or a bed adjacent to a patio where friends gather. Prep the soil by adding compost for good drainage. You will need to choose flowers that can handle the light exposure, climate of your region, and soil ph. Annuals which last a single growing season provide the showiest flower displays. Perennials will repeat their life cycle again for several seasons and reuie less work in the long run. The same goes for bulbs and tubers like daffodls and lilies. Layer in the plants according to height. Planting small flowering shrubs or interesting foliar plants with striking color are also good choices. Remember that it will take awhile to fill in, but it will look stunning. Water regularly and keep the area weeded too.

  5. shimmering Dawn profile image82
    shimmering Dawnposted 5 years ago

    Begonias and anthuriums... I love them and some frangipani for the corners of your land.. oh that will be awesome. I wish I had so much space  smile

  6. 0
    manumposted 5 years ago

    If you like bright flowers put lots of colour and if you like delicate flowers, put lots of secondary flowering plants like marigolds or roses.

  7. LeeWalls profile image60
    LeeWallsposted 5 years ago

    Can someone please tell me which ones are perennials?

    1. recommend1 profile image70
      recommend1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      perennials are those that surive the winter and flower avery year, against annuals that you have to grow from seed every year.  Perennials are the occasional gardeners best friend big_smile

      To give you any real help we would have to know the climate where you are, wet or dry, soil type and whether it is acid or alkaline.  The easy way is to tell us what grows naturally around you.

  8. LeeWalls profile image60
    LeeWallsposted 5 years ago

    The climate is frigid and at times warm. The soil is also dry; What is acid or alkaline when it comes to soil?

    1. cat on a soapbox profile image82
      cat on a soapboxposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Soil ph will determine the plants that can grow in a given area.
      The ph scale runs from 1-14. 7 is neutral. Anything below 7 is acidic. Anything above is alkaline. You can pick up a basic soil test kit at a garden center.

      1. recommend1 profile image70
        recommend1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        just describing the local plants that do well is enough to know the soil type - if they can't be named then just describe them.  This guy doesn't know anything it would appear so getting into the chemistry is maybe asking a bit much at this stage in his horticultural education big_smile

  9. tsmog profile image84
    tsmogposted 5 years ago

    Hello hewhohn. MPM makes some good recommendations about planning. There is a lot of good advice. I can say that natural plants to your area are best. But, what is your garden theme. Mine is a hummingbird / butterfly garden, so my plants are chosen for that purpose. If you are in California try www.Laspilitas.com
    for advice on different plants. I guarantee you will never be able to finish reading there site. And, if not from California there how to go about it and ideology of gardening will go a long way too. remember to have fun, fun, fun

  10. LeroyShane profile image60
    LeroyShaneposted 5 years ago

    Why don't you try for hydroponics for growing your plants?
    Hydroponics is a process of growing any plant in water, whether it be tomatoes, strawberries or bulbs, without the use of any soil. Start growing plants and vegetables in water-filled containers with hydroponics supplies.

  11. LeeWalls profile image60
    LeeWallsposted 5 years ago

    This is a great site. Thank you so much for all the suggestions.

  12. Growblogg profile image60
    Growbloggposted 5 years ago

    Alyssum, or carpet of snow are very easy and will cover the entire area nicely. It grows anywhere and comes back every year. Its small and rather discrete, so will not look too manicured and will drown out any weeds. Really,for best tips, you would have to explain what your soil type is, what climate (area ) you are in,how many hours of direct sun this spot gets..and If this is in the ground directly or would you consider containers to bring indoors in winter. Also if you are interested in continuous flowering or just want to cover the area to not see the soil.

  13. bernieadkins profile image77
    bernieadkinsposted 5 years ago

    If you have a lot of space and want a semi-care free garden bed try planting hosta, lariope (monkey grass), or some small shrubbery. These are usually low maintenance, pest resistant and easy to grow. They also have the added benefit of filling up space quickly. You can then interplant with colorful annual flowers during spring and summer months.

    Your local nursery will sell plants that are right for your area but you will need to pay attention to the lighting requirements and get plants that have the same lighting needs.