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Rodent in a wall, chewing, gnawing, lots of noise...

  1. Sally's Trove profile image98
    Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago

    ...but I don't see anything, like no horse shoe shaped hole ala Tom and Jerry. And the noise goes on only at night.

    I've inspected the outside of the house and see nothing amiss, but I'm not a mouse.

    Thoughts, experiences? Call in an exterminator, wait for a hole to show up in my dining room? Any ideas will be helpful.

    1. seanorjohn profile image80
      seanorjohnposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      This would be a nightmare for me coz I have phobia about mice. Yes, you must speak with your neighbour and find out if it needs to be caught on their property. Make sure you cut off all supplies to food. Look down the settees for crumbs etc.Get some peppermint oil or plants ( they hate peppermint)to stop the rodent from moving into your proprty.
      Electronic devices can be very effective but don't use them if you have a pet dog because it can be very distressing for them.  I have written a hub on best ways to get rid of mice but it doesn't deal with getting rid of rats. Best of luck and let us know how things work out.

      1. Sally's Trove profile image98
        Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        There is no issue of food here. Whatever the creature is, it hasn't made it into my house.


        I love this! My good friend had a mouse that moved into her Porsche while it was wintered under cover. The mouse (I'm sure it was mice) ripped out insulation to make a nest. She treated her car with peppermint oil, and the car smelled great! She finally had to catch the creature in a sticky trap.

    2. Pearldiver profile image85
      Pearldiverposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Are you sure that it isn't a neighbor? yikes

      Didn't Nora Beaver move into your local community recently? yikes

      You must have known that she is a cereal gnawer, as she was highlighted on the AMW show after being suspected of chewing her way into people's homes so that she could watch Corn videos while they were asleep yikes

      I'm sure that here is a reward out for Nora Beaver. She was last seen in Moosejaw with her boyfriend Brian pretending to be Chipmonks. Surely, you realize that it's not a good idea to let them into your home.. Beavers tend not to be house-trained and well......... you'd be better off it they were Rats! roll






























      big_smile

      1. Sally's Trove profile image98
        Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I don't even know where to begin with this, but I LURVE it.

        1. Pearldiver profile image85
          Pearldiverposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          smile Sorry about that big_smile

          Couldn't resist your thread smile

          Anyway.. get rid of the rats as they will gnaw all your electric cables - which then puts the house at risk from an electrical short and potential fire sad

          AND Don't worry... disregard the Beaver Heads-Up.. smile

          If you ain't got no Corn videos at your place.. you'll be ok smile

  2. 2uesday profile image88
    2uesdayposted 5 years ago

    I think you need to get it sorted as soon as possible as rats and mice cause fires by chewing through electricity cables. Mice can squeeze through really small gaps so do not need a doorway as in the cartoons. It is possible that they are in the loft or squeezing into the house through small gaps, I mean really small even mesh covered gaps etc. . Search for info on this as someone has a hub about it cannot remember the name though.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      TY, these are gelatinous creatures whose skulls probably morph to squeeze through a small space. You are so right about the wires...this wall has electric service running through it. I'll look for the hub, too. If you find it, let me know.

  3. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    It time for traps or an exterminator.  Rodents plus wiring is a bad combination.

    IMHO the most humane trap is an old-fashioned neck breaker. Bait with peanut butter, place against wall near hole, leave in the same position for at least 3 days as they will often avoid it while it is new.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      The problem is, I have no idea where to put a trap, because there's no evidence of this invasion in the interior of my house, nor at the exterior. I failed to mention that my house adjoins another, so the thing might be in my neighbor's wall, or mine. Will check that out with her...has she heard anything?

      1. psycheskinner profile image80
        psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        If you have a hole on your side they are getting in, if not you should get the exterminator who will be able to put something inside the wall cavity to get them.... they will also be able to look for where they got in and block that off.

  4. Gordon Hamilton profile image95
    Gordon Hamiltonposted 5 years ago

    I had something like this in the early Spring this year - though it turned out to be birds nesting, rather than rodents, and the chicks eventually got in to the house when they were learning to fly. I would call in an exterminator as soon as possible, especially where you can't see how they're getting in. It is not just the wiring, the longer you leave the problem unaddressed, the more all round damage is likely to be done.

    Good luck and I hope you let us know how you get on.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      TY, I think you are right. I'd like to deal with this myself (avoiding the expense of an exterminator), but I haven't a clue about how this creature got in, or even where it is, exactly. I can pinpoint the noise location, but that's about it. BTY, how did the chicks out of your house?

      1. Gordon Hamilton profile image95
        Gordon Hamiltonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I'm lucky enough to have a big country park near to where I live, including a bird sanctuary. I phoned them for advice and they told me to catch the chicks one by one and lay them outside, where the parents would find them. Incredibly, less than half an hour later (as I was struggling to do this) two park rangers arrived at my door with a wooden bird house which they set up in the garden and put all the chicks inside - with the exception of one, which died. They told me to check it after three days and when I did, all the chicks were gone!

        My dog loved the chicks and didn't attack them in any way. They weren't in the least phased by him, either. The photo is genuine and one of the many I have of that morning...

        http://s3.hubimg.com/u/5698286_f248.jpg

        1. Sally's Trove profile image98
          Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          This is such a beautiful story. I think sometimes animals know how to behave better than people. That's a fantastic photo. Thank you so much for sharing.

        2. Hollie Thomas profile image59
          Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Ah, that reminds me of my dog and hamster.

  5. paradigmsearch profile image89
    paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago
    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      TY, this is a fantastic article. I was wondering if rodents were nocturnal, and this article answered that. I don't hear the gnawing unless it's at night. So that sets up a false comfort zone...no noise in the daylight, so everything's copacetic. Wrong!

  6. profile image0
    Wilfionposted 5 years ago

    I used to hear the noise of what sounded like an animal in the wall, yet it was a solid wall, with no gaps behind it, and there were no signs of a hole for it to have gotten in.  However, there was sometimes some kind of seed along the skirting board.  The noise stopped eventually.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      This happened to me, in this house, about eight years ago. I heard some chewing or whatever, and it stopped and ended. I never saw evidence of a food trail or anything. It just stopped. I'm sure I'm living in denial...hoping this little thing will just go away, like the other one did.

  7. profile image0
    Home Girlposted 5 years ago

    If you do not have a cat, you need an exterminator for sure. Those pesky things can multiply, you know. I had 2 cats when we had an old house and we never had any problems with pests! Everything alive that tried foolishly to penetrate their territory had been quickly exterminated by them! Everything but raccoons. They simply ignored them. Scared, may be.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I have no cats now, although I did have outdoor cats and indoor cats, for many years. Two funny things about this. When I had outdoor cats, they could care less about a mouse in the house. When I had indoor-only cats, they were crazy to get outside and catch a mouse. LOL

  8. waynet profile image49
    waynetposted 5 years ago

    The mice are right inconsiderate creatures and they don't even contribute to the rent or any household bills!! I once set 10 traps over night with chocolate buttons and peanut butter and woke up in the morning to find 8 dead mice, 2 traps had sprung, but they must have escaped or been caught by the others!

    If you know were they come from and their run ways, you can catch the little pests....the trouble is to catch all of them though as they say for every one mice you may see there could be 10 -15 more knocking around....

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      This is true about cockroaches, too. You see one, you know there are a hundred more. I have no doubt there's more than one rodent at work in my wall...and soon it (they) will be breeding.

  9. jcmayer777 profile image77
    jcmayer777posted 5 years ago

    You won't always see mouse holes.  They can squeeze through the tiniest of holes and slits...like underneath wall to floor molding.  Kill them or call an exterminator.

    Set out traps anywhere you think they might be and wait.  Spring traps, sticky traps, poison, etc.  Just make sure you use the right trap to fit your home. (don't want a kid eating the poison or a pet setting off a trap)

    Exterminators are spendy, but they can often figure out the entry point for your home, so you can seal it off, and let you know exactly how big the problem is.  If you see or hear one, there's probably a lot more than one.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      You hit the nail on the head. I can't figure out how this one got into the wall. There's nothing on the outside of the house that looks like an entry point.

      I've gotten great advice from you all...looks like I have to call the exterminator.

      If the creature were leaving droppings on my counter, I'd be fine with a have-a-heart trap (I've done that before, in another house), but this one's in the wall, and for the life of me, I can't figure out what it wants. There's no food there, only warmth and a dry place. Maybe that's enough.

  10. 2uesday profile image88
    2uesdayposted 5 years ago

    I found this after a searching thro' over 200 hubs smile

    http://pcunix.hubpages.com/hub/keeping- … -or-camper

  11. barryrutherford profile image28
    barryrutherfordposted 5 years ago
    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Another case for bringing in the exterminator...ty.

  12. barryrutherford profile image28
    barryrutherfordposted 5 years ago

    Absolutely! going up into the loft is a very dirty business and finding the dams things is nigh impossible during the day

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      TY, Barry. I ain't goin' there!

  13. Mary Ruddy profile image59
    Mary Ruddyposted 5 years ago

    Unfortunately I had mice this time last year in my home and I have a massive phobia about them. The gnawing and scratching makes my skin crawl. I would start hearing them late evening, above my head, and it turned out they were in my upstairs bathroom, underneath my bath.

    My landlord came to thoroughly investigate, and it turns out, they come coming into the attic, and down a wall cavity, into the bathroom and under the bath.

    Before I move in, the landlord had some work done on the house but never really check what the workers did. The house had been rewired among other things and the workers he used lefts large gaping holes everywhere, even though mice can get through the tiniest point.

    He traced their route by following their dropping and it turned out they were actually coming into my house from the neighbours attic next door. He found holes in the attic wall between the 2 houses. He filled those up, put down stuff to get rid of them, filled up all of the holes left by workers, and thankfully, the problem was solved, cos to be honest, it was a case of me or them!

    I hope you get it sorted as it is not an nice experience and they will look for a way into your home and the heat, so better to try to find out how they are getting into the wall.

    all the best,
    Mary

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Mary, what a story! The very good news is that you have a landlord who took this seriously and also took the steps to correct the problems.

      Your story reminds me of another house I lived in, where I discovered squirrels living in the attic (loft) only because of the nuts and seeds they stored in a rug of mine that was rolled up and still in its wrapping from the rug cleaner. One day I wanted to put that rug down in the house, opened it up, and found loads of seeds! Like what happened to you, the landlord fixed it. He found a hole under the eaves and plugged it up. No more squirrel.

  14. S G Hupp profile image83
    S G Huppposted 5 years ago

    My brother had this happen a number of years ago and it turned out to be a squirrel which had found a way into the attic somewhere up by the roof.  Eventually his little friend found a way into the house by chewing into the back of a cupboard, if I remember right.  Anyway, it spent several days rummaging through the house while they were at work before they were able to trap it and send it on its way.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      These guys can cause a lot of damage and a lot of angst. That was one persistent squirrel your brother had. Not satisfied to store its stuff in the attic, it went on the trail of finding free food in the kitchen. Makes me wonder to what lengths any opportunistic creature will go to get what it wants...like homo sapiens.

    2. Hollie Thomas profile image59
      Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      A couple of years ago my neighbor,( are lofts are not separated,)  said there were bats nesting in our lofts and asked whether I'd be willing to share the costs to have them removed, humanely as much as we could. I agreed, we called this guy out to inspect our mutual loft space. After inspection, we were told that our visitors, were in fact squirrels, with their offspring. He suggested we sealed the loft so they couldn't get out for food, and would, therefore, eventually die of starvation. I was completely opposed to this, as a result, myself and my neighbor allowed the squirrels to remain until the spring. They weren't doing any damage to our properties though. So a different scenario.

      1. Sally's Trove profile image98
        Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        But what happened in the spring, or at the end of spring. Are they still there????

        1. Hollie Thomas profile image59
          Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          No, we got the same man to remove them (in a sack) the 2nd week of spring. They were better able to find food then, and care for their offspring. I know this sounds really odd, but during the winter, myself and my neighbor would leave bits of bread and nuts and stuff in the garden. We could see where the parent ( female I think, though I have no way of knowing for sure) could get out of the loft space and into the garden. As far as I know they never entered my kitchen or any other space in my house. They certainly didn't chew any wiring that I'm aware of. But it's a different scenario, if your property is being damaged and they are chewing through wires, then you have to do something about it.

  15. Stacie L profile image87
    Stacie Lposted 5 years ago

    A funny thing happened yesterday; a chipmunk was scaling my window ,trying to get inside. I have never seen this before and wondered if one had gotten into my house last year as I had chewing in the walls also.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      That's really weird behavior from a chipmunk. Or a mouse, or a squirrel. They don't usually scale windows. I wonder if there's a story there, real or imagined? smile

  16. sunforged profile image64
    sunforgedposted 5 years ago

    I had a single mouse in my first apartment after college. never had even seen one before.

    Would hear it at night, but never could find it.

    Through happenstance I had left a box of cardboard for recycling near the door, including a box of spaghetti that still had a little in it.

    Heard mouse chewing ... grabbed box, covered it. Mouse caught.

    Didnt want to throw outside into the cold Buffalo winter, so placed it in a much larger box and went to bed. Mouse was way gone in the morning, of course.

    Over the next week. I caught that mouse with the spaghetti box at least a half a dozen times. But, never managed to contain (her) in anything afterwards.


    a few weeks later .. while cooking a pizza I smelled some truly awful smell ... seems she had a little nest ... had been taking insulation from under the fridge and stove to build it ... figured out that some of the noises I had heard must have been the little meeses yelling for milk.

    I believe they were all cooked that night and that stove was never usable again.

    sad

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      OMG

      A great case for letting the problem take care of itself.

      At the cost of a new stove for you. Sad and funny.

  17. paradigmsearch profile image89
    paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago

    How come nobody has posted any rat pics on this thread yet?

    Do I have to do EVERY thing?

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Maybe you do. smile But we're not talking about rats...just squirrels and mice. Where would we be without you?

      1. paradigmsearch profile image89
        paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        lol

  18. profile image0
    Home Girlposted 5 years ago

    That's why you need a cat! We had so many holes in our old house, but never-ever mice running around. Plenty of killed ones by our cats though. One of my cats was so desperate for attention that she took the killed mouse, went upstairs on the second floor and put the dead mouse into my oldest son's bed. Don't you dare to ignore the hard work of ours!

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I know what you mean about cats, and I miss mine. I'm sure this gnawing thing in the wall would amuse cats for a long time. Probably better than a laser pen light!

      One of my last kitties was an indoor cat named Pepper. She was dying of cancer, almost unable to walk, and was to be euthanized the next day, so my daughter and I brought her out on the porch with us in the early evening and placed her on a big cushion on the floor near our feet. After a few minutes of enjoying the quiet, Pepper flew off the cushion, ran across the porch, dived into a planting of hosta, and in an instant surfaced with a squirming, squealing mouse in her mouth. She'd never seen a mouse in her life, but she sure knew what to do. It was an amazing display of mind over matter.

      Another of our cats, Anisette, would bring her finds...mice and baby rabbits...to our back doorstep and pile them up, just as you say, so as not to be ignored. Thank you for sharing your story. smile

  19. Sally's Trove profile image98
    Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago

    Since I started this thread, two nights have passed without any gnawing sounds. I'm crossing my fingers, hoping that's the end of that, in which case that would be a lucky thing for both me and the rodent. Meanwhile, I've gone around the outside of my house and my neighbor's, again, without finding any obvious entry point. I'm thinking maybe it was just too much work for the thing to finish its project, and it gave up. Wish me luck while I bury my head in the sand!

  20. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    If you find an entry point the best option is any kind of spackle or putty, with some fine-smashed glass in it. They won't even try to chew through it.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      What a good idea. But there is no hole!

  21. Rochelle Frank profile image88
    Rochelle Frankposted 5 years ago

    You may find some good suggestions in the comments of one of my hubs,
    http://rochelle-frank.hubpages.com/hub/ … Your-Motor

    A lot of people think peanut butter is a good trap bait.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      That's a fabulous Hub with enlightening comments! (Talk about evergreen.) A friend of mine has been plagued recently with mice in her not much used Porsche. To the tune now of a couple of thousand dollars of repair work. I'll pass this on.

      Mice love cheese. I've caught a few in the past with that bait. But first, you have to have access to the mouse, and this rodent is nowhere that I have access to, as in a firewall between two houses.

  22. IzzyM profile image86
    IzzyMposted 5 years ago

    Just put some rat poison down on either side of the wall you are hearing the noises from.
    You can buy stuff in pellet form that is dead cheap. Dissolve it in Coca-cola, rats love a drink, and leave it.
    If the coke disappears...bingo!

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      OMG...Coke Cocktail. My mind just went to the dark side, probably because of reading too many crime mysteries.

      But the problem is, I can't get access to where the noise was coming from. I'd have to put those drinks all around my house, and woe be to the poor outdoor kitty or nosy leashed dog who also wants a drink.

  23. aware profile image70
    awareposted 5 years ago

    The hole  has already showed up but not in your living room .   They have a  entrance you cant see. already. Finding this breach  in the perimeter  of your home is key to eradicating nuisance rodents .   thorough inspection  for holes in skirting,  basement areas,  and truss venting  systems   might sound  complicated  but  its not.  Look for holes . Seal them . Then trap the   nuisance rodent. Poison  leaves a dead rotting carcase in your  wall.  I do not recommend you do that.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      My house sits on a concrete slab, so there are no venting systems or a basement. However, you gave me a good idea...I need to get on my back with a flashlight to see if there's a hole where the siding meets the slab. I'd never see that hole standing up, but I might lying down.

      1. Rochelle Frank profile image88
        Rochelle Frankposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        So if anyone sees Sally lying on the ground outside of her house, don't panic.

        1. Sally's Trove profile image98
          Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          You gave me an idea...to wear a day-glo orange vest that says, "I'm not dead." lol That'll save my neighbors a call to the EMTs.

  24. GmaGoldie profile image86
    GmaGoldieposted 5 years ago

    When I had dogs, I had to have them spend time in my garage or else I would find the mice would visit my car!

    Fascinating post - thank you! Very important with winter approaching.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      You are right about winter...those rodents are looking for cozy places, especially since our ground has been saturated since late August.

      I'll have to tell my friend with the Porsche that she either needs to turn her indoor cats loose on the outdoor car, or get a dog!

      Another friend had vole problems in her foundation plantings...until she fenced in her yard and let her dogs run free around the house. No more problems. smile

  25. davenmidtown profile image87
    davenmidtownposted 5 years ago

    We get t his all the time... something, a mouse probably is making a nest for the winter.  As long as there is not an abundance of food around... nothing to worry about.  The noise goes away in a few weeks and they settle down for their long winters nap.  Mice and rats do not bother me... I used to raise fancy rats so I kinda like them.  Even in the 8 years that I have lived here I have never had a mouse or rat in my apartment.  I do have three cats though... 

    I will say that nothing is as loud as a murder of ravens on the roof looking for food.  I swear it sounded like the Calvary about to charge into battle!

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      A murder of ravens...I like that.

 
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