My Tomatoes Were Hit by a late Frost in April

Frost-Damaged Tomato Plant

Source

I Was Sure All the Tomatoes I Had Planted the Weekend Before Were Dead

When it warms up in April here on the California Central Coast, gardeners often throw conventional wisdom out the window. Surely when you're in the midst of an April heat wave the frost season is over. April 24 seems an arbitrary last frost date when it's triple digit weather on April 17. So I planted the wonderful heirloom tomatoes I'd been buying at Farmer's Market for two weekends. Even when the nights got cooler, I didn't worry too much about my tomato garden. High 30s didn't seem too dangerous. So I didn't worry about getting the row covers on. Then Jack Frost paid my lovely tomatoes a visit. I learned that it always pays to be prepared for frost, even when you don't expect it. The picture shows what he did to my tomato transplants the weekend after they were planted.

I took all the photos in this lens except as otherwise noted.

Only Healthy Plant Left

Source

The Gruesome Discovery

I didn't even suspect.

Sure, I knew the days had gotten cooler the last week of April, and I had felt the chilling wind. The weatherman, however, kept silent about impending frost. I was, after all, busy. We had discovered some termite damage that week, and I was busy moving books around to allow access for repairs. (See lensroll at right to read more about the termite fight.)

After the heat wave ended and I wasn't in the garden every day to water, I wasn't keeping close tabs on what was happening in the raised beds. I was more worried that the lettuce would wilt or bolt from the heat, and I had put some dead branches with the leaves fanned out flat over them to help shade them. I watered about every three days when it started to cool off. The last Friday in April, which just happened to be the 24th, I was busy elsewhere. When I went out to water on Sunday, all the tomatoes but this one lone Celebrity, appeared to be dead. The only green I could see was the the lower part of the stems on the others -- even the other Celebrity planted only two feet away.

My Favorite Gardening Books

Great Garden Companions: A Companion-Planting System for a Beautiful, Chemical-Free Vegetable Garden
Great Garden Companions: A Companion-Planting System for a Beautiful, Chemical-Free Vegetable Garden

This book has been a great inspiration to me. I actually take it to the garden with my seeds and other gardening tools. When I'm planning a garden, it's also a great help, with its many suggested layouts. Besides that, it's just fun to read during those off-season months when you are itching to get your hands in the soil and see things growing again. It discusses plant rotation, beneficial insects and how to attract them, preventing pest problems, and, of course, companion planting. It also teaches you how to make a raised bed, what to fill it with, and how to water it. I highly recommend it, and I love the clear illustrations of how to do things, as well as the gorgeous photos of the plants and gardens.

 

Has frost ever killed your plants?

This year is the first time I lost vegetables. About three years ago I lost some flowers when we had an usually cold winter. I thought then my gazanias were gone forever, but most grew back again from the roots.

What kind of frost damage have you experienced?

See results without voting
The New Self-Sufficient Gardener
The New Self-Sufficient Gardener

The version I have is now out of print, but this is a good basic book for those who want to grow their own food using deep beds to grow more food in less space.. Its illustrations are especially helpful. My version is arranged by vegetable families, and also shows what should be going on in the garden through each season of the year. It helps you determine how large your garden should be to feed you and tells you how to preserve all your produce after harvest. Other topics covered are herb gardens, growing in a greenhouse, garden paths, and many more. At the beginning of the book is a wonderful illustration showing the ecology of the soil and how things look in a healthy soil underground.This is followed by color drawings of vegetables, fruits, and herbs by their families, and most include the entire plant (except for trees) -- root, stem, blossoms, leaves, and fruit. That's something I haven't seen in any other book in my vast collection of gardening books.

 

Getting Advice at Farmers Market

Ralph Johnson offers advise
Ralph Johnson offers advise | Source

I Was Devastated.

If you've ever planted something, cared for it, and lost it, you know how I felt.

I didn't pull up the ten plants I was sure were going to die. Hope springs eternal, I guess. I did water well and I did put up row covers to keep any other late frosts away. I made daily visits, but it looked pretty hopeless. All I saw were partly green stems and brown leaves.

On the next Saturday, I went back to Farmers Market and went straight to Ralph Johnson's booth. He had sold me the tomatoes and I wanted to see about getting more. He's the only one that brings heirloom tomatoes to sell. I told him my sad story and he told me all was not lost. He told me that if there was even one green leaf left on a plant, it could survive. He told me to keep watering and that although the plants might get a two-week set-back, they would probably come back if there was enough root in the ground.

I was pretty sure I had plenty of root. I normally pick off any blossoms when I plant and then I pull away the four bottom leaves and plant the stem deep into the ground. I bought just a couple more tomatoes, another sage, and some golden squash. I decided to go home and wait it out.

After another week, this is what I found under the row covers. - It was hard to believe the resurrection I was seeing.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
This Early Girl still looks mostly dead, but there is a tiny bit of green there at the bottom. There is hope.You can see a lot more new shoots on this plant. I think it is the other Celebrity.This is probably the other Early Girl.I'm not quite sure what variety this is, but it might be the yellow pear.I don't' remember this one's name, but it is getting green and that's what's important.This is the Mortgage Lifter. It's making a lot of progress, and I think there is even a blossom or two. It looks like Ralph was right. I did, however, buy two more Anna Russians from him today, because I'm pretty sure those two are beyond hope.
This Early Girl still looks mostly dead, but there is a tiny bit of green there at the bottom. There is hope.
This Early Girl still looks mostly dead, but there is a tiny bit of green there at the bottom. There is hope. | Source
You can see a lot more new shoots on this plant. I think it is the other Celebrity.
You can see a lot more new shoots on this plant. I think it is the other Celebrity. | Source
This is probably the other Early Girl.
This is probably the other Early Girl. | Source
I'm not quite sure what variety this is, but it might be the yellow pear.
I'm not quite sure what variety this is, but it might be the yellow pear. | Source
I don't' remember this one's name, but it is getting green and that's what's important.
I don't' remember this one's name, but it is getting green and that's what's important. | Source
This is the Mortgage Lifter. It's making a lot of progress, and I think there is even a blossom or two. It looks like Ralph was right. I did, however, buy two more Anna Russians from him today, because I'm pretty sure those two are beyond hope.
This is the Mortgage Lifter. It's making a lot of progress, and I think there is even a blossom or two. It looks like Ralph was right. I did, however, buy two more Anna Russians from him today, because I'm pretty sure those two are beyond hope. | Source

Where There's Life, There's Hope

It pays to be patient.

When I first saw the results of Jack Frost's visit to my tomato garden, I was sure my tomatoes were doomed. My first impulse was to just rip them out, wait until there was no chance of frost again, and replace the dead plants. But if there is one thing a gardener needs to learn, it's patience. When the Biblical writer James wants to show an example of patience, he uses the farmer: "Behold, the farmer waits for the precious fruit of the earth, being patient over it until it receives the early and the late rain." (James5:7)

I'm glad now I did not follow my first impulse and give up. By waiting for two weeks I saved myself from buying eight new plants. I also learned that God has built into plants a way for them to heal themselves when the wound is not fatal. I have learned that if I am patient enough to wait and see, my damaged plants might very well still live to grow and produce fruit. I am hoping to post some pictures later in the season when these plants I almost gave up on start bearing their tomatoes.

A New Threat

Creative Commons CC0
Creative Commons CC0 | Source

New pictures of once dead tomatoes on July 25, 2009 - You will see that some have made a lot of progress, some not so much.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
I'm not sure which tomato this is, but it is one of the ones that I thought was dead after the frost.This may be another view of the previous plant, or it may be a different one. It's hard to label when I'm taking pictures.This is one of the replacement Anna Russians I planted when I yanked out the dead ones. It never did do well, which surprised me, since the one I had in a pot last year was one of my best. I think it's a problem with the raised bed soil.This is the other replacement Anna Russian. It looks a tad better than the other and has some blossoms, but it still has some sick looking leaves. The one I had last year was lush and green and was about two feet tall by now.This is my Stupice and it's doing better that any of the others. It's pretty healthy and green, and it's getting taller and bearing fruit. It's got a lot of little green tomatoes.This is a view of all the tomatoes in that raised bed. These are taller than the ones in the other raised bed. A couple of those are still barely six inches high, just greener than they were.
I'm not sure which tomato this is, but it is one of the ones that I thought was dead after the frost.
I'm not sure which tomato this is, but it is one of the ones that I thought was dead after the frost. | Source
This may be another view of the previous plant, or it may be a different one. It's hard to label when I'm taking pictures.
This may be another view of the previous plant, or it may be a different one. It's hard to label when I'm taking pictures. | Source
This is one of the replacement Anna Russians I planted when I yanked out the dead ones. It never did do well, which surprised me, since the one I had in a pot last year was one of my best. I think it's a problem with the raised bed soil.
This is one of the replacement Anna Russians I planted when I yanked out the dead ones. It never did do well, which surprised me, since the one I had in a pot last year was one of my best. I think it's a problem with the raised bed soil. | Source
This is the other replacement Anna Russian. It looks a tad better than the other and has some blossoms, but it still has some sick looking leaves. The one I had last year was lush and green and was about two feet tall by now.
This is the other replacement Anna Russian. It looks a tad better than the other and has some blossoms, but it still has some sick looking leaves. The one I had last year was lush and green and was about two feet tall by now. | Source
This is my Stupice and it's doing better that any of the others. It's pretty healthy and green, and it's getting taller and bearing fruit. It's got a lot of little green tomatoes.
This is my Stupice and it's doing better that any of the others. It's pretty healthy and green, and it's getting taller and bearing fruit. It's got a lot of little green tomatoes. | Source
This is a view of all the tomatoes in that raised bed. These are taller than the ones in the other raised bed. A couple of those are still barely six inches high, just greener than they were.
This is a view of all the tomatoes in that raised bed. These are taller than the ones in the other raised bed. A couple of those are still barely six inches high, just greener than they were. | Source

Frost Can Kill

Sometimes only barrier protection will keep plants from damage.

High Quality Portable Green House w/ Shelves
High Quality Portable Green House w/ Shelves

A greenhouse would have helped my poor tomatoes more than my efforts to try to save them after they were damaged. Hubby is finally seeing that it would be worth the money.

 

Update on my reviving tomatoes on August 15, 2009 - This is almost four months after the freeze.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
This is how the tomatoes in the deeper raised beds look now. The plant with the red tomatoes is the Stupice, which seems to have recovered the fastest and was least affected by the soil problem. The tomatoes in this picture were some of the sickest -- the Pruden's Purple on the left and the Yellow Pear on the right. The middle plant is Thai basil. I don't think the Yellow Pear has recovered enoughto bear well this year.This photo shows the five small Celebrity and Early Girl tomatoes that just don't want to put on any height. As you can see, one is bearing fruit, some have blossoms, and all have turned a healthy green color.These potted plants did not have the same soil problems as the plants in the raised beds, so they got off to a better start. The plant in the foreground was affected by the freeze, but not as severely as the plants in the raised beds.
This is how the tomatoes in the deeper raised beds look now. The plant with the red tomatoes is the Stupice, which seems to have recovered the fastest and was least affected by the soil problem.
This is how the tomatoes in the deeper raised beds look now. The plant with the red tomatoes is the Stupice, which seems to have recovered the fastest and was least affected by the soil problem. | Source
The tomatoes in this picture were some of the sickest -- the Pruden's Purple on the left and the Yellow Pear on the right. The middle plant is Thai basil. I don't think the Yellow Pear has recovered enoughto bear well this year.
The tomatoes in this picture were some of the sickest -- the Pruden's Purple on the left and the Yellow Pear on the right. The middle plant is Thai basil. I don't think the Yellow Pear has recovered enoughto bear well this year. | Source
This photo shows the five small Celebrity and Early Girl tomatoes that just don't want to put on any height. As you can see, one is bearing fruit, some have blossoms, and all have turned a healthy green color.
This photo shows the five small Celebrity and Early Girl tomatoes that just don't want to put on any height. As you can see, one is bearing fruit, some have blossoms, and all have turned a healthy green color. | Source
These potted plants did not have the same soil problems as the plants in the raised beds, so they got off to a better start. The plant in the foreground was affected by the freeze, but not as severely as the plants in the raised beds.
These potted plants did not have the same soil problems as the plants in the raised beds, so they got off to a better start. The plant in the foreground was affected by the freeze, but not as severely as the plants in the raised beds. | Source

How the Tomatoes Looked on September 2, 2009.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
This is an overview of the raised beds that had both the freezing and the soil problems. You can see I've mulched them, and that did help during the heat waves. None of them have produced more than blossoms.These two were planted in containers. The middle container is basil. They look very odd because I have used snippets of pantyhose to cover the tomatoes where I could, to keep them from being eaten, as my first developing tomatoes were.This is a close-up of the large raised bed. The only plant which actually bore fruit is the one dressed in orange. That bag is there to keep the birds from pecking at the few fruits that are under it. It produces only a few small fruits. The slant is strange because I'm trying to avoid the shadow and still get that last plant in the lower right corner to show . It was blocked by the bag on the Stupice before. You can compare the heights of the plants with the August pictures above
This is an overview of the raised beds that had both the freezing and the soil problems. You can see I've mulched them, and that did help during the heat waves. None of them have produced more than blossoms.
This is an overview of the raised beds that had both the freezing and the soil problems. You can see I've mulched them, and that did help during the heat waves. None of them have produced more than blossoms. | Source
These two were planted in containers. The middle container is basil. They look very odd because I have used snippets of pantyhose to cover the tomatoes where I could, to keep them from being eaten, as my first developing tomatoes were.
These two were planted in containers. The middle container is basil. They look very odd because I have used snippets of pantyhose to cover the tomatoes where I could, to keep them from being eaten, as my first developing tomatoes were. | Source
This is a close-up of the large raised bed. The only plant which actually bore fruit is the one dressed in orange. That bag is there to keep the birds from pecking at the few fruits that are under it. It produces only a few small fruits.
This is a close-up of the large raised bed. The only plant which actually bore fruit is the one dressed in orange. That bag is there to keep the birds from pecking at the few fruits that are under it. It produces only a few small fruits. | Source
The slant is strange because I'm trying to avoid the shadow and still get that last plant in the lower right corner to show . It was blocked by the bag on the Stupice before. You can compare the heights of the plants with the August pictures above
The slant is strange because I'm trying to avoid the shadow and still get that last plant in the lower right corner to show . It was blocked by the bag on the Stupice before. You can compare the heights of the plants with the August pictures above | Source

An Early Frost Made Me Dress My Tomatoes in Row Covers - Don't they look like ghosts for Halloween?

Click thumbnail to view full-size
These are two of my most productive tomatoes. The tall one produces sweet, cherry-size orange tomatoes. After last week's storm the tomatoes started to be more productive and also larger. It is sharing the cover with a shorted  plant.This tomato is a Principe Borghese. It produces small, sweet red fruits that can actually dry on the plant for dried tomatoes -- if the frost holds off long enough. I have never done this, because we also enjoy them in salads and in cooked dishes. This is my large raised bed. Some of the tomatoes here are just producing their first fruit of the season. The rain last week seemed to bring them to production. Such a shame if that fruit doesn't have a chance to get big enough to pick.
These are two of my most productive tomatoes. The tall one produces sweet, cherry-size orange tomatoes. After last week's storm the tomatoes started to be more productive and also larger. It is sharing the cover with a shorted  plant.
These are two of my most productive tomatoes. The tall one produces sweet, cherry-size orange tomatoes. After last week's storm the tomatoes started to be more productive and also larger. It is sharing the cover with a shorted plant. | Source
This tomato is a Principe Borghese. It produces small, sweet red fruits that can actually dry on the plant for dried tomatoes -- if the frost holds off long enough. I have never done this, because we also enjoy them in salads and in cooked dishes.
This tomato is a Principe Borghese. It produces small, sweet red fruits that can actually dry on the plant for dried tomatoes -- if the frost holds off long enough. I have never done this, because we also enjoy them in salads and in cooked dishes. | Source
This is my large raised bed. Some of the tomatoes here are just producing their first fruit of the season. The rain last week seemed to bring them to production. Such a shame if that fruit doesn't have a chance to get big enough to pick.
This is my large raised bed. Some of the tomatoes here are just producing their first fruit of the season. The rain last week seemed to bring them to production. Such a shame if that fruit doesn't have a chance to get big enough to pick. | Source

You can protect your crops, too.

Floating row covers can protect crops from early frosts, allowing you to start your garden earlier, or it can help extend the growing season. They also help protect young plants from insect damage until they are old enough to defend themselves. You can see in my pictures that I did not just float them. I used rocks to weigh down the edges and corners and I used clothespins to close gaps. I did this because we also got 50 mph winds with our cold snap. We often have fairly strong winds, and it just doesn't make sense here to let the row covers float without support.

Gardeneer By Dalen Harvest-Guard Seed Germination & Garden Protection Cover 5' x 50'
Gardeneer By Dalen Harvest-Guard Seed Germination & Garden Protection Cover 5' x 50'

I spotlighted this because these row covers have helped me in the past to start crops earlier and keep them growing later . They let light and water through, but keep the crops a few degrees warmer by holding in heat during the day and keeping the frost at bay by a few degrees. Depending upon the thickness, they can raise the temperature by 4-6 degrees. Had I had these in the early spring this year, my crops might not have frozen in the first place, but I didn't think ahead last fall, and in the spring this year, none of the local nurseries or farm supply stores had any in stock. Think ahead. Get yours now. You can cut them up for container plants, or huddle a lot of containers together under one, as I did. You can also cover an entire raised bed as I did. If your raised beds are larger than mine, you could use close-pins to join two in the middle.

 

May 11, 2010: A New Start and August Update

I Just Can't Win with Tomatoes This Year

I put all those new plants in yesterday, working even as it began to sprinkle. Everyone in the nurseries and at Farmers Market has told me they are fairly sure I won't encounter any late frosts now. I hope they are right. I'm already envisioning this year's crop of yummy varieties of heirloom tomatoes. I will continue my adventures with this year's tomatoes on another page of this lens or in a new lens. I haven't decided yet which. I'm hoping to have some pictures of a colorful and delicious harvest about August.

Update: This year's tragedy is a ground squirrel invasion. I have moved every container tomato I can lift to our property in Paso Robles, thus saving some of the tomatoes. See the pictures and the full story of what these destructive animals did.

Feel free to share anything that comes to mind from reading this.

More by this Author


Please share any comments or tomato tips you might have. - We love learning from fellow gardeners. 41 comments

Linda BookLady profile image

Linda BookLady 7 years ago from Post Falls, Idaho, USA

My gardening disaster this year came from lack of watering. It was early in the spring and I was worried I was over-watering the plants. In the morning I noticed the ground appeared wet so I didn't water the tomatoes or squash. Big mistake! I nearly lost five plants and did actually give up on one tomato. It took more than a couple of weeks but my squash plants came back beautifully and are producing big-time. My tomato that almost died came back slowly and now has lots of flowers and tiny green tomatoes.Thanks for the information on your frost disaster. I was thinking that next year I'd start my plants before the end of April... and maybe you've changed my mind, or at least changed my strategy!


anonymous 7 years ago

Great lens on my favorite fruit the tomato! Old Jack Frost can sure give us headaches!


paperfacets profile image

paperfacets 7 years ago from La Verne, CA

You had "come back" plants. Excellent.


Stazjia profile image

Stazjia 7 years ago from Warminster, Wiltshire, UK

How sad that they've got hit by something else after surviving the frost. I remember a few years ago when I went away for a week leaving my partner in charge of the garden and tomatoes. When I came back they were in the last stages of a fungal attack. There was nothing to do but pull them up and burn them to stop it spreading to anything else. I was very annoyed and upset.


GramaBarb profile image

GramaBarb 7 years ago from Vancouver

I've lost plants over the years to an unexpected frost - but I guess I didn't wait long enough to see if they would grow back - they looked so bad that I pulled them out and started over.


grannysage 7 years ago

Back in my “hippie” days, I tried some French Intensive gardening, I had great plans for all the produce I was going to grow and then can. All I can say is that it was very “intensive” gardening and I mostly got a lot of zucchini. I do admire anyone who can actually grow something!


BarbRad profile image

BarbRad 7 years ago from Templeton, CA Author

[in reply to grannysage] Zucchini is one thing I have never been able to grow much of. Everyone jokes about how much they get, but i'm lucky if I get ten medium size ones a summer. I had a good crop of lemon cucumbers two years ago and almost enough last year, but this year all i've been able to get from they plants is one baby cuke. The leaves look like they aren't happy, and I'm afraid the plants won't do anything this year. I should, however, get enough tomatoes from the plants that did not freeze.


LaraineRoses profile image

LaraineRoses 7 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

The weather this year has been crazy for us gardeners. Our springtime and usual planting days were cold and then summer came with a bang. Very hot days seemed to stunt all the plants. I was hand watering everything twice a day for about 2 weeks. We had a couple of nice rains when everything grew and then, exceptionally hot weather again. Our thermometer read 102F degrees today. I'm hand watering again. We try to use the sprinkler after the sun goes down but we have a big acreage and no underground system so it is impossible to water everywhere. Fruit trees, flowering shrubs and flower beds are all drying up. Waaaaa I'm thinking of doing a rain dance.


AppalachianCoun profile image

AppalachianCoun 7 years ago

Mr. Ralph was a blessing. Wonderful lens. We hope you have a bumper crop even with this last trial. 5 stars*****


BarbRad profile image

BarbRad 7 years ago from Templeton, CA Author

This has just been a disappointing gardening year. Last Saturday I picked a few small tomatoes and left quite a few green ones on the plants in pots, which mostly were not the ones that had frozen. Now the nights are cold again. I've been sick all week and could not get out to water, but the paper said the low was 32 on Monday night. I hope to have enough energy to go out and see if there's anything left. I guess if the plants didn't freeze again, it's time to put row covers back on. If they did, I will give up


LaraineRoses profile image

LaraineRoses 7 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

Saw your lenscast and decided to come back for a look at your row covers. I've never used them .. just use heavy plastic stuck up on the cages and weighed down with bricks. I had a bumper crop of tomatoes this year with a lot of green ones left to ripen in the house for eating now. I'm not bragging .. just the way it is some years. Good year or bad year. This just happened to be a good year.


BarbRad profile image

BarbRad 7 years ago from Templeton, CA Author

[in reply to LaraineRose] Thanks for your return visit. Do you get the plastic through catalogs or farm supply stores and use regular tomato cages? Or do you put the plastic on those big hop-like frames? About how many degrees warmer does the plastic make it?This year's crop has been very disappointing with the weather ups and downs. It froze last night and maybe it will freeze tonight before morning, but it' supposed to be 80 tomorrow.


Lee Hansen profile image

Lee Hansen 6 years ago from Vermont

In PA we must cover tender crops until mid-May, although we often have temps in the 80s during April. We lost our squash to bugs and our tomatoes to blight that blew in on the wind from plants a mile away at WalMart last summer. This year we hope there's no blight, and we're using row covers on the squash to keep the bugs away from our organic veggies. Love this lens ... 5*


Grasmere Sue profile image

Grasmere Sue 6 years ago from Grasmere, Cumbria, UK

Hope it doesn't happen to you again this year!


BarbRad profile image

BarbRad 6 years ago from Templeton, CA Author

@Grasmere Sue: It won't. I haven't' even started preparing the raised beds yet this year. I wont' be planting anything until at least the second week in May.


SandyMertens profile image

SandyMertens 6 years ago from Frozen Tundra

It is May and we have recently gone though frost advisories. It looks like some late planting. Good luck planting this year.


RhondaAlbom profile image

RhondaAlbom 6 years ago from New Zealand

Interesting information on frost bitten tomatoes. Hope you have a great crop this year.


anonymous 6 years ago

I'm glad your tomatoes recovered. It is heart wrenching to go to the garden and find dead or damaged plants. Better luck this year. :D


Amy Fricano profile image

Amy Fricano 6 years ago from WNY

great tips! just saw some dead tomatoes at my friend's tonight...looked just like yours.


ElizabethJeanAl profile image

ElizabethJeanAl 6 years ago

I'm glad they recovered. I planted early this year and fretted everyday when the temperature dropped. We didn't get a frost but it was close. Some of my tomatoes are over three feet tall now and are starting to set tomatoes. My husband claims I fret over my tomatoes more than I fretted over the kids when they were small. I think he's right.Thanks for sharing.Lizzy


BarbRad profile image

BarbRad 6 years ago from Templeton, CA Author

@Amy Fricano: I feel for your friend. I hope they recover better than mine did and bear fruit.


BarbRad profile image

BarbRad 6 years ago from Templeton, CA Author

@ElizabethJeanAl: Unfortunately, they never recovered enough to bear more than two pounds of fruit between the sixteen tomato plants. Next year I will spry them with Freeze Pruf if I have any doubts about the weather. (See ad in sidebar.) Bu I will still never plant before the last predicted frost date again.


OhMe profile image

OhMe 6 years ago from Pendleton, SC

My mother in law said "Where There's Life, There's Hope" but I don't think she was ever referring to tomato plants. They were farmers so she may have. It is so interesting to read journals from my husband's grandmother. They sure made me realize the importance of the weather to farmers. Every page always started with a weather report. Sounds like you got some real good advice at the Farmers Market and hope you will soon be picking some sun warmed tomatoes from these plants.


norma-holt profile image

norma-holt 6 years ago

Tomatoes are the one thing I worry about the most. How early to plant and how long to leave covered. You are not alone in your experience. *-*Blessed*-* and featured on Sprinkled with Stardust


VarietyWriter2 profile image

VarietyWriter2 6 years ago

Sorry for your lose. Nice lens. Blessed by a SquidAngel :)


tssfacts 5 years ago

Great article. I learned everything about growing tomatoes from my Mom. She could grow anything. Even grew a tomato plant from a seed that was found on her tooth once.


dellgirl 5 years ago

Love this lens, it's very well done. I have a couple of tomato plants (wish I had gotten more) but, I'm just starting out and didn't want to overdo it.


anonymous 5 years ago

really helpful..


antoniow 4 years ago

Fantastic lens! You did a great job! SQuidlike


ricber profile image

ricber 4 years ago

I am able to now look ahead to my future. Thanks for your time so much for your reliable and amazing guide for Tomatoes. I will not be reluctant to propose your blog post to any person who wants and needs guidance on this issue.


KyraB 3 years ago

Good to know that tomatoes can recover after a frost, I'll live in Northern California and like you can get a frost once in and while late spring right when you think winter is over.


anonymous 3 years ago

my romas got bit buy frost but at ground level it was still green I cut them off at the green part,what do you all think replace or wait and see?


BarbRad profile image

BarbRad 3 years ago from Templeton, CA Author

@anonymous: You'll have to just wait and see.


sheilamarie78 profile image

sheilamarie78 3 years ago

I had no idea tomato plants could recover like that! It gives me hope, but doesn't make me reckless enough to put my tomatoes out yet this year!


BarbRad profile image

BarbRad 3 years ago from Templeton, CA Author

@sheilamarie78: Wise decision!


smine27 profile image

smine27 2 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

I tried tomatoes twice and both times they were killed by frost.


BarbRad profile image

BarbRad 2 years ago from Templeton, CA Author

I'm sorry. I know how it feels.


Sandyspider profile image

Sandyspider 19 months ago from Wisconsin, USA

I feel bad when any of my plants die. Hope you had a great garden this year.


BarbRad profile image

BarbRad 10 months ago from Templeton, CA Author

Sandy, I haven't had time or energy to have a vegetable garden this year. I eat my weeds. We may plant a tomato in a pot this year.


SandyMertens profile image

SandyMertens 10 months ago from Frozen Tundra

Still waiting for Spring to happen here. This is a cold April. Cannot plant tomatoes or anything right now.


BarbRad profile image

BarbRad 7 months ago from Templeton, CA Author

We had a fairly warm April, but I just wasn't able to plant anything this year. I know tomatoes would be doing well in our current heat wave.

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