Think Spring: Which Plants Can Grow In Your Area?

Could this flower grow in your area?
Could this flower grow in your area? | Source

Which Plants Can I Grow?

This map gives a general idea of where the major hardiness zones in the US are located.  For more detailed information for your area, it's necessary to consult the regional and state hardiness zone maps, as local temperatures can vary wildly.
This map gives a general idea of where the major hardiness zones in the US are located. For more detailed information for your area, it's necessary to consult the regional and state hardiness zone maps, as local temperatures can vary wildly. | Source

Do you pay attention to hardiness zones when picking your plants?

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When planting outdoors, the first thing you need to be sure of is that whichever plants you want to plant will survive the minimum winter temperatures of your area.

If, for example, I plant a tree that can't handle the low temperatures I get here in winter, that tree will probably not survive for very long. I don't know how many times I've heard someone say they aren't sure why their plants keep dying, but it's because those plants can't grow in their region. They may do fine in spring and summer, but after a winter that's harsher than the plants can stand, they will inevitably die.

Therefore, knowing what types of plants are capable of growing in your area is key to cultivating a thriving garden. This is where the Plant Hardiness Zone comes in.

Here is a great definition of hardiness zones from Wikipedia:

"A hardiness zone (a subcategory of Vertical Zonation) is a geographically defined area in which a specific category of plant life is capable of growing, as defined by climatic conditions, including its ability to withstand the minimum temperatures of the zone (see the scale on the right or the table below).

For example, a plant that is described as 'hardy to zone 10' means that the plant can withstand a minimum temperature of -1°C. A more resilient plant that is 'hardy to zone 9' can tolerate a minimum temperature of -7°C." -- Wikipedia

Find Your State, Scroll Down To Your #

Reference #
USDA Regional Designation
States
# 1
Northeastern
Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia
# 2
Southeastern
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee
# 3
South Central
Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas (East), Texas (West)
# 4
Southwestern
Arizona, California (Northern), California (Southern), Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah
# 5
Northwestern
Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, Wyoming
# 6
North Central
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin
# 7
Non-continental
Alaska
# 8
Non-continental
Hawaii

#1: Northeastern US

Hardiness Zones, Northeastern US
Hardiness Zones, Northeastern US | Source
State
Hardiness Zones
Connecticut
5b, 6a, 6b, 7a
Delaware
7a, 7b
Indiana
5b, 6a, 6b
Kentucky
6a, 6b, 7a
Maine
3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a
Maryland & D.C.
5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a
Massachusetts
5a, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b
Michigan
4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b
New Hampshire
3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a
New Jersey
6a, 6b, 7a, 7b
New York
3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 7a, 7b
Ohio
5b, 6a, 6b
Pennsylvania
5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b
Rhode Island
5b, 6a, 6b, 7a
Vermont
3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b
Virginia
5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a
West Virginia
5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a

Northeastern US: Hardiness Zones By State

The list (at right) includes all the growing zones listed for your state. This does not mean that each of these growing zones will exist in your zip code (town/city), however.

While some states remain pretty steady across the board, many states vary widely from one location to another.

To get more detailed information for your area, go to this web site: planthardiness.ars.usda.gov

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Japanese AnemoneLady's Slippers OrchidMerrybells (Uvularia grandiflora)ClematisFoam FlowerMaidenhair FernStairway to HeavenTrilliumAmerican Coral BellsEastern BluestarWild GingerRose MilkweedRed MapleJapanese BarberryAmerican ChestnutEastern RedbudFlowering DogwoodMaidenhair TreeAmerican Witch-hazelMorrow's Honeysuckle
Japanese Anemone
Japanese Anemone | Source
Lady's Slippers Orchid
Lady's Slippers Orchid | Source
Merrybells (Uvularia grandiflora)
Merrybells (Uvularia grandiflora) | Source
Clematis
Clematis | Source
Foam Flower
Foam Flower | Source
Maidenhair Fern
Maidenhair Fern | Source
Stairway to Heaven
Stairway to Heaven | Source
Trillium
Trillium | Source
American Coral Bells
American Coral Bells | Source
Eastern Bluestar
Eastern Bluestar | Source
Wild Ginger
Wild Ginger | Source
Rose Milkweed
Rose Milkweed | Source
Red Maple
Red Maple | Source
Japanese Barberry
Japanese Barberry | Source
American Chestnut
American Chestnut | Source
Eastern Redbud
Eastern Redbud | Source
Flowering Dogwood
Flowering Dogwood | Source
Maidenhair Tree
Maidenhair Tree | Source
American Witch-hazel
American Witch-hazel | Source
Morrow's Honeysuckle
Morrow's Honeysuckle | Source

Northeastern Plants

  • American Chestnut (Castanea dentata)
  • American Coral Bells (Heuchera americana)
  • Anemone (Anemone hupehensis)
  • Clematis (Clematis)
  • Eastern Bluestar (Amsonia)
  • Eastern Redbud (Cercis canadensis)
  • Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida)
  • Foam Flower (Tiarella)
  • Japanese Barberry (Berberis thunbergii)
  • Lady Slippers Orchid (Cypripedioidea)
  • Maidenhair Fern (Adiantum)
  • Maidenhair Tree (Ginkgo biloba)
  • Merrybells (Uvularia grandiflora)
  • Morrow's Honeysuckle (Lonicera morrowii)
  • Red Maple (Acer rubrum)
  • Rose Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)
  • Stairway to Heaven (Polemonium reptans)
  • Trillium (Trillium grandiflorum)
  • Wild Ginger (Asarum canadense)

#2: Southeastern US

Hardiness Zones, Southeastern US
Hardiness Zones, Southeastern US | Source
State
Hardiness Zones
Alabama
7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a
Florida
8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11a
Georgia
6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a
Mississippi
7b, 8a, 8b, 9a
North Carolina
5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b
South Carolina
7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a
Tennessee
5b, 6a, 6b, 7a. 7b, 8a

Southeastern US: Hardiness Zones By State

The list (at right) includes all the growing zones listed for your state. This does not mean that each of these growing zones will exist in your zip code (town/city), however.

While some states remain pretty steady across the board, many states vary widely from one location to another.

To get more detailed information for your area, go to this web site: planthardiness.ars.usda.gov

Click thumbnail to view full-size
SunflowerIndian BlanketBergamot / Scarlet BeebalmBlazing StarJewelweedWild GeraniumMilkweed / Butterfly-weedTickseedJoe-Pye WeedIronweedRed BuckeyeFringe TreePaw PawSourwoodRed BayCarolina SilverbellAmelanchier / SugarplumTrumpet VineCarolina Jasmine / JessaminePassionflower
Sunflower
Sunflower | Source
Indian Blanket
Indian Blanket | Source
Bergamot / Scarlet Beebalm
Bergamot / Scarlet Beebalm | Source
Blazing Star
Blazing Star | Source
Jewelweed
Jewelweed | Source
Wild Geranium
Wild Geranium | Source
Milkweed / Butterfly-weed
Milkweed / Butterfly-weed | Source
Tickseed
Tickseed | Source
Joe-Pye Weed
Joe-Pye Weed | Source
Ironweed
Ironweed | Source
Red Buckeye
Red Buckeye | Source
Fringe Tree
Fringe Tree | Source
Paw Paw
Paw Paw | Source
Sourwood
Sourwood | Source
Red Bay
Red Bay | Source
Carolina Silverbell
Carolina Silverbell | Source
Amelanchier / Sugarplum
Amelanchier / Sugarplum | Source
Trumpet Vine
Trumpet Vine | Source
Carolina Jasmine / Jessamine
Carolina Jasmine / Jessamine | Source
Passionflower
Passionflower | Source

Southeastern Plants

  • Amelanchier / Sugarplum (Amelanchier)
  • Bergamot / Scarlet Beebalm (Monarda didyma)
  • Blazing Star (Liatris spicata)
  • Carolina Jasmine / Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens)
  • Carolina Silverbell (Halesia carolina)
  • Fringe Tree (Chionanthus virginicus)
  • Indian Blanket (Gaillardia pulchella)
  • Ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis)
  • Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis)
  • Joe-Pye Weed (Eupatorium fistulosum)
  • Milkweed / Butterfly-weed (Asclepias tuberosa)
  • Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata)
  • Paw Paw (Asimina triloba)
  • Red Bay (Persea borbonia)
  • Red Buckeye (Aesculus pavia)
  • Sourwood (Oxydendrum arboreum)
  • Sunflower (Helianthus annuus)
  • Tickseed (Coreopsis)
  • Trumpet Vine (Campsis radicans)
  • Wild Geranium (Geranium maculatum)

#3: South Central US

Hardiness Zones, South Central US
Hardiness Zones, South Central US | Source
States
Hardiness Zones
Arkansas
6b, 7a, 7b, 8a
Louisiana
8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a
Oklahoma
6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a
Texas (East)
7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a
Texas (West)
6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

South Central US: Hardiness Zones By State

The list (at right) includes all the growing zones listed for your state. This does not mean that each of these growing zones will exist in your zip code (town/city), however.

While some states remain pretty steady across the board, many states vary widely from one location to another.

To get more detailed information for your area, go to this web site: planthardiness.ars.usda.gov

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Texas BluebellCrossvineAmerican BeautyberryTexas PaintbrushRoughleaf DogwoodLance-leaved CoriopsisSweetbell / HogdobbleScarlet HibiscusMeadow HollyRed GiliaAmerican SweetgumFlorida MapleAmerican HornbeamWhite FringetreeLeatherwoodAmerican Strawberry BushAmerican BeechWhite AshGreen Ash / Red AshAmerican Winterberry
Texas Bluebell
Texas Bluebell | Source
Crossvine
Crossvine | Source
American Beautyberry
American Beautyberry | Source
Texas Paintbrush
Texas Paintbrush | Source
Roughleaf Dogwood
Roughleaf Dogwood | Source
Lance-leaved Coriopsis
Lance-leaved Coriopsis | Source
Sweetbell / Hogdobble
Sweetbell / Hogdobble | Source
Scarlet Hibiscus
Scarlet Hibiscus | Source
Meadow Holly
Meadow Holly | Source
Red Gilia
Red Gilia | Source
American Sweetgum
American Sweetgum | Source
Florida Maple
Florida Maple | Source
American Hornbeam
American Hornbeam | Source
White Fringetree
White Fringetree | Source
Leatherwood
Leatherwood | Source
American Strawberry Bush
American Strawberry Bush | Source
American Beech
American Beech | Source
White Ash
White Ash | Source
Green Ash / Red Ash
Green Ash / Red Ash | Source
American Winterberry
American Winterberry | Source

South Central Plants

  • American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana)
  • American Beech (Fagus grandifolia)
  • American Hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana)
  • American Strawberry Bush (Euonymus americanus)
  • American Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua)
  • American Winterberry (Ilex verticillata)
  • Crossvine (Bignonia capreolata)
  • Florida Maple (Acer floridanum)
  • Green Ash / Red Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica)
  • Lance-leaved Coriopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata)
  • Leatherwood (Cyrilla racemiflora)
  • Meadow Holly (Ilex decidua)
  • Red Gilia (Ipomopsis aggregata)
  • Roughleaf Dogwood (Cornus drummondii)
  • Scarlet Hibiscus (Hibiscus coccineus)
  • Sweetbell / Hogdobble (Leucothoe axillaris)
  • Texas Bluebell (Eustoma)
  • Texas Paintbrush (Castilleja indivisa)
  • White Ash (Fraxinus americana)
  • White Fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus)

#4: Southwestern US

Hardiness Zones, Southwestern US
Hardiness Zones, Southwestern US | Source
States
Hardiness Zones
Arizona
4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b
California (Southern)
5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11a
California (Northern)
5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b
Colorado
3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a
Nevada
4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a
New Mexico
4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a
Utah
4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Southwestern US: Hardiness Zones By State

The list (at right) includes all the growing zones listed for your state. This does not mean that each of these growing zones will exist in your zip code (town/city), however.

While some states remain pretty steady across the board, many states vary widely from one location to another.

To get more detailed information for your area, go to this web site: planthardiness.ars.usda.gov

Click thumbnail to view full-size
HarebellBearberryPrairie SmokeGolden ColumbineSouthwestern Prickly PoppyShowy MilkweedDesert MarigoldOwl's CloverRocky Mountain BeeplantPlains CoreopsisShooting StarParry's AgaveServiceberrySilver SagebrushRedtwig DogwoodWild PlumNew Mexico LocustSilver BuffaloberryBanana YuccaPlains Yucca
Harebell
Harebell | Source
Bearberry
Bearberry | Source
Prairie Smoke
Prairie Smoke | Source
Golden Columbine
Golden Columbine | Source
Southwestern Prickly Poppy
Southwestern Prickly Poppy | Source
Showy Milkweed
Showy Milkweed | Source
Desert Marigold
Desert Marigold | Source
Owl's Clover
Owl's Clover | Source
Rocky Mountain Beeplant
Rocky Mountain Beeplant | Source
Plains Coreopsis
Plains Coreopsis | Source
Shooting Star
Shooting Star | Source
Parry's Agave
Parry's Agave | Source
Serviceberry
Serviceberry | Source
Silver Sagebrush
Silver Sagebrush | Source
Redtwig Dogwood
Redtwig Dogwood | Source
Wild Plum
Wild Plum | Source
New Mexico Locust
New Mexico Locust | Source
Silver Buffaloberry
Silver Buffaloberry | Source
Banana Yucca
Banana Yucca | Source
Plains Yucca
Plains Yucca | Source

Southwestern Plants

  • Banana Yucca (Yucca baccata)
  • Bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi)
  • Desert Marigold (Baileya multiradiata)
  • Golden Columbine (Aquilegia chrysantha)
  • Harebell (Campanula rotundifolia)
  • New Mexico Locust (Robinia neomexicana)
  • Owl's Clover (Castilleja exserta)
  • Parry's Agave (Agave parryi)
  • Plains Yucca (Yucca glauca
  • Prairie Smoke (Anemone patens)
  • Redtwig Dogwood (Cornus stolonifera)
  • Rocky Mountain Beeplant (Cleome serrulata)
  • Serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia)
  • Shooting Star (Dodecatheon pulchellum)
  • Showy Milkweed (Asclepias speciosa)
  • Silver Buffaloberry (Shepherdia argentea)
  • Silver Sagebrush (Artemisia cana)
  • Southwestern Prickly Poppy (Argemone pleiacantha)
  • Wild Plum (Prunus americana)

#5: Northwestern US

Hardiness Zones, Northwestern US
Hardiness Zones, Northwestern US | Source
States
Hardiness Zones
Idaho
3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b
Montana
3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a
Oregon
4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b
Washington
4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a
Wyoming
3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a

Northwestern US: Hardiness Zones By State

The list (at right) includes all the growing zones listed for your state. This does not mean that each of these growing zones will exist in your zip code (town/city), however.

While some states remain pretty steady across the board, many states vary widely from one location to another.

To get more detailed information for your area, go to this web site: planthardiness.ars.usda.gov

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Farewell to SpringBog-laurelMock-orangeWild RoseWild HyacinthGraceful CinquefoilOregon IrisWestern ColumbineSea ThriftTwinflowerPacific StarflowerSalmonberryOregon Pine / Douglas FirOregon Cherry / Bitter CherryOregon AshGrand FirMooseberryWestern White PineSitka SpruceWestern Red Cedar
Farewell to Spring
Farewell to Spring | Source
Bog-laurel
Bog-laurel | Source
Mock-orange
Mock-orange | Source
Wild Rose
Wild Rose | Source
Wild Hyacinth
Wild Hyacinth | Source
Graceful Cinquefoil
Graceful Cinquefoil | Source
Oregon Iris
Oregon Iris | Source
Western Columbine
Western Columbine | Source
Sea Thrift
Sea Thrift | Source
Twinflower
Twinflower | Source
Pacific Starflower
Pacific Starflower | Source
Salmonberry
Salmonberry | Source
Oregon Pine / Douglas Fir
Oregon Pine / Douglas Fir | Source
Oregon Cherry / Bitter Cherry
Oregon Cherry / Bitter Cherry | Source
Oregon Ash
Oregon Ash | Source
Grand Fir
Grand Fir | Source
Mooseberry
Mooseberry | Source
Western White Pine
Western White Pine | Source
Sitka Spruce
Sitka Spruce | Source
Western Red Cedar
Western Red Cedar | Source

Northwestern Plants

  • Bog-laurel (Kalmia polifolia)
  • Farewell to Spring (Clarkia amoena)
  • Graceful Cinquefoil (Potentilla gracilis)
  • Grand Fir (Abies grandis)
  • Mock-orange (Philadelphus)
  • Mooseberry (Viburnum edule)
  • Oregon Ash (Fraxinus latifolia)
  • Oregon Cherry / Bitter Cherry (Prunus emarginata)
  • Oregon Iris (Iris tenax)
  • Oregon Pine / Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga)
  • Pacific Starflower (Trientalis latifolia)
  • Salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis)
  • Sea Thrift (Armeria maritima)
  • Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis)
  • Twinflower (Linnaea)
  • Western Columbine (Aquilegia formosa)
  • Western Red Cedar (Thuja plicata)
  • Western White Pine (Pinus monticola)
  • Wild Hyacinth (Camas)
  • Wild Rose (Rosa nutkana)

#6: North Central US

Hardiness Zones, North Central US
Hardiness Zones, North Central US | Source
States
Hardiness Zones
Illinois
5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a
Iowa
4b, 5a, 5b, 6a
Kansas
5b, 6a, 6b, 7a
Minnesota
3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a
Missouri
5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b
Nebraska
4a, 4b, 5a, 5b
North Dakota
3a, 3b, 4a, 4b
South Dakota
3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b
Wisconsin
3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b

North Central US: Hardiness Zones By State

The list (at right) includes all the growing zones listed for your state. This does not mean that each of these growing zones will exist in your zip code (town/city), however.

While some states remain pretty steady across the board, many states vary widely from one location to another.

To get more detailed information for your area, go to this web site: planthardiness.ars.usda.gov

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Wild LupineWild ColumbineJack-in-the-PulpitWhite AsterMarsh MarigoldHarebellWhite TurtleheadBottle GentianNorthern Blue FlagRough Blazing StarCardinal FlowerButtercupTrilliumCinnamon FernSugar MapleRiver BirchPagoda DogwoodTamarackQuaking Aspen
Wild Lupine
Wild Lupine | Source
Wild Columbine
Wild Columbine | Source
Jack-in-the-Pulpit
Jack-in-the-Pulpit | Source
White Aster
White Aster | Source
Marsh Marigold
Marsh Marigold | Source
Harebell
Harebell | Source
White Turtlehead
White Turtlehead | Source
Bottle Gentian
Bottle Gentian | Source
Northern Blue Flag
Northern Blue Flag | Source
Rough Blazing Star
Rough Blazing Star | Source
Cardinal Flower
Cardinal Flower | Source
Source
Buttercup
Buttercup | Source
Trillium
Trillium | Source
Cinnamon Fern
Cinnamon Fern | Source
Sugar Maple
Sugar Maple | Source
River Birch
River Birch | Source
Pagoda Dogwood
Pagoda Dogwood | Source
Tamarack
Tamarack | Source
Quaking Aspen
Quaking Aspen | Source

North Central Plants

  • Black Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)
  • Bottle Gentian (Gentiana andrewsii)
  • Buttercup (Ranunculus)
  • Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis)
  • Cinnamon Fern (Osmundastrum cinnamomeum)
  • Harebell (Campanula rotundifolia)
  • Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum)
  • Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris)
  • Northern Blue Flag (Iris versicolor)
  • Pagoda Dogwood (Cornus alternifolia)
  • Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides)
  • River Birch (Betula nigra)
  • Rough Blazing Star (Liatris aspera)
  • Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum)
  • Tamarack (Larix laricina)
  • Trillium (Trillium grandiflorum)
  • White Aster (Symphyotrichum ericoides)
  • White Turtlehead (Chelone glabra)
  • Wild Columbine (Aquilegia canadensis)
  • Wild Lupine (Lupinus perennis)

#7: Alaska

Hardiness Zones, Alaska
Hardiness Zones, Alaska | Source
State
Growing Zones
Alaska
1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b

Alaska: Hardiness Zones

The list (at right) includes all the growing zones listed for your state. This does not mean that each of these growing zones will exist in your zip code (town/city), however.

While some states remain pretty steady across the board, many states vary widely from one location to another.

To get more detailed information for your area, go to this web site: planthardiness.ars.usda.gov

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Tufted VetchSalmonberryNutka RoseBunchberryHeartleaf ArnicaDwarf FireweedBeautiful Jacob's LadderAlpine Forget-Me-NotWestern ColumbineFireweedJapanese RoseWestern HemlockAlaska CypressBalsam PoplarAmerican BittersweetScarlet Trumpet HoneysuckleVirginia CreeperPaper Birch / White BirchJapanese Tree LilacSilver Maple
Tufted Vetch
Tufted Vetch | Source
Salmonberry
Salmonberry | Source
Nutka Rose
Nutka Rose | Source
Bunchberry
Bunchberry | Source
Heartleaf Arnica
Heartleaf Arnica | Source
Dwarf Fireweed
Dwarf Fireweed | Source
Beautiful Jacob's Ladder
Beautiful Jacob's Ladder | Source
Alpine Forget-Me-Not
Alpine Forget-Me-Not | Source
Western Columbine
Western Columbine | Source
Fireweed
Fireweed | Source
Japanese Rose
Japanese Rose | Source
Western Hemlock
Western Hemlock | Source
Alaska Cypress
Alaska Cypress | Source
Balsam Poplar
Balsam Poplar | Source
American Bittersweet
American Bittersweet | Source
Scarlet Trumpet Honeysuckle
Scarlet Trumpet Honeysuckle | Source
Virginia Creeper
Virginia Creeper | Source
Paper Birch / White Birch
Paper Birch / White Birch | Source
Japanese Tree Lilac
Japanese Tree Lilac | Source
Silver Maple
Silver Maple | Source

Alaska Plants

  • Alaska Cypress (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis)
  • Alpine Forget-Me-Not (Myosotis alpestris)
  • American Bittersweet (Celastrus scandens)
  • Balsam Poplar (Populus balsamifera)
  • Beautiful Jacob's Ladder (Polemonium pulcherrimum)
  • Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis)
  • Dwarf Fireweed (Chamerion latifolium)
  • Fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium)
  • Heartleaf Arnica (Arnica cordifolia)
  • Japanese Rose (Rosa rugosa)
  • Japanese Tree Lilac (Syringa reticulata)
  • Nutka Rose (Rosa nutkana)
  • Paper Birch / White Birch (Betula papyrifera)
  • Salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis)
  • Scarlet Trumpet Honeysuckle (Ipomopsis aggregata)
  • Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum)
  • Tufted Vetch (Vicia cracca)
  • Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia)
  • Western Columbine (Aquilegia formosa)
  • Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla)

#8: Hawaii

Hardiness Zones, Hawaii
Hardiness Zones, Hawaii | Source
State
Hardiness Zones
Hawaii
9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11a, 11b, 12a, 12b, 13a

Hawaii: Hardiness Zones

The list (at right) includes all the growing zones listed for your state. This does not mean that each of these growing zones will exist in your zip code (town/city), however.

While some states remain pretty steady across the board, many states vary widely from one location to another.

To get more detailed information for your area, go to this web site: planthardiness.ars.usda.gov

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Lehua FlowerBird of ParadiseFrangipaniTahitian GardeniaGardeniaMa'o Hau Hele / Yellow HibiscusPassion FlowerLitchi / LycheeRed Ginger / Ostrich PlumeMagnoliaAutograph TreeUluhe / Old World Forked FernKahlil GingerHawaiian LilyVelvet TreeKoaHalaMāmaneHydrangeaŌhelo 'ai
Lehua Flower
Lehua Flower | Source
Bird of Paradise
Bird of Paradise | Source
Frangipani
Frangipani | Source
Tahitian Gardenia
Tahitian Gardenia | Source
Gardenia
Gardenia | Source
Ma'o Hau Hele / Yellow Hibiscus
Ma'o Hau Hele / Yellow Hibiscus | Source
Passion Flower
Passion Flower | Source
Litchi / Lychee
Litchi / Lychee | Source
Red Ginger / Ostrich Plume
Red Ginger / Ostrich Plume | Source
Magnolia
Magnolia | Source
Autograph Tree
Autograph Tree | Source
Uluhe / Old World Forked Fern
Uluhe / Old World Forked Fern | Source
Kahlil Ginger
Kahlil Ginger | Source
Hawaiian Lily
Hawaiian Lily | Source
Velvet Tree
Velvet Tree | Source
Koa
Koa | Source
Hala
Hala | Source
Māmane
Māmane | Source
Hydrangea
Hydrangea | Source
Ōhelo 'ai
Ōhelo 'ai | Source

Hawaii Plants

  • Autograph Tree (Clusia major)
  • Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia reginae)
  • Frangipani (Plumeria)
  • Gardenia (Gardenia)
  • Hala (Pandanus odoratissimus)
  • Hawaiian Lily (Solandra maxima)
  • Hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla)
  • Kahlil Ginger (Hedychium gardnerianum)
  • Koa (Acacia koa)
  • Lehua Flower (Metrosideros polymorpha)
  • Litchi / Lychee (Litchi chinensis)
  • Ma'o Hau Hele / Yellow Hibiscus (Hibiscus brackenridgei)
  • Magnolia (Magnolia)
  • Māmane (Sophora chrysophylla)
  • Passion Flower (Passiflora)
  • Red Ginger / Ostrich Plume (Alpinia purpurata)
  • Tahitian Gardenia (Gardenia taitensis)
  • Uluhe / Old World Forked Fern (Dicranopteris linearis)
  • Velvet Tree (Miconia calvescens)
  • Ōhelo 'ai (Vaccinium reticulatum)

Copyright © 2012 Faceless39. All rights reserved.



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Comments 9 comments

krosch profile image

krosch 4 years ago

Thanks for a great hub, looking at some new plants and trees for the backyard. This will likely be a very handy starting point in what kinds of things to start looking at.


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

What an incredibly useful and detailed and beautiful article. Thank you for spending so much time on it and for including all the great maps and graphs. Just terrific. SHARING!!. :)


RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

You've put together an amazing resource that will be helpful to many people. Interesting to read through you info on plant hardiness zones, and the photos are beautiful. You even included Alaska! I don't think I've seen the shooting star before--such a pretty flower!


Kathleen Cochran profile image

Kathleen Cochran 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

OK. Sounds like you are somebody who might be able to answer this question for me. I just bought some black eyed susans that are supposed to come back year after year. Outside the package said plant in partial sun. Inside the package said they need at least five hours of full sun. !!!!!!!!!!!! Do you know which answer is right?


Faceless39 profile image

Faceless39 4 years ago from The North Woods, USA Author

@Kathleen, I think they meant that full sun is okay, as in partial sun (where the flowers will get a few hours of full or dappled sun per day.) Here is a resource to help you out: http://www.almanac.com/plant/black-eyed-susans

Thank you all for you uplifting comments. This hub was a lot of work, and it's great to get positive feedback about it!


Faceless39 profile image

Faceless39 4 years ago from The North Woods, USA Author

I meant to say full sun is okay as *is partial sun!


Kathleen Cochran profile image

Kathleen Cochran 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Finally, an answer. Thanks!


frogpetals profile image

frogpetals 4 years ago from Christiansburg, VA

This is great!! I always try to find the right plants, but the crazy thing is that our Home Depot and Lowes sells things that aren't for our area. It's crazy!! I usually try to go to a local greenhouse. Thanks for the great hub!


Faceless39 profile image

Faceless39 4 years ago from The North Woods, USA Author

That's really odd that Home Depot would sell the wrong stuff. Maybe they consider some of the plants indoor or something. I guess it's more likely, though, that they don't know about good old hardiness zones!

Thanks for the comments!

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