20 Great Movie Classics of the 1960's (Part 1)

Psycho ~ 1960

The Apartment

Breakfast at Tiffany's

To Kill a Mockingbird

Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?

The Hustler

A Hard Days Night

Dr. Zhivago

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

The Graduate

 

20 Great Movie Classics of the 1960's (Part 1)

  1. Psycho ~ 1960 The character of "Norman Bates" was actually based on a true-life story of a Wisconsin serial killer. The goes that movie fans actually formed lines around the block to see this blockbuster hit once word-of-mouth enthusiastically traveled. Shrieking screams could literally be heard outside of theaters. Oscar nominations were garnered for Alfred Hitchcock for best director and actress Janet Leigh won for best supporting actress.

  2. The Apartment ~ 1960 This Billy Wilder film won 5 Academy Awards, count 'em 5, including Best Picture, director and screenplay. Jack Lemmon played the scrupulous "C.C. Baxter" in a bare to the bone manner, and Shirley Maclaine brilliantly portrayed the discarded mistress "Fran Kubelik". Sarcastically funny, yet surprisingly endearing.

  3. Breakfast at Tiffany's ~ 1961 A breathtakingly romanticized version of the Truman Capote novel of the same name. Blake Edwards managed to direct a wonderful and inspiring film that starred Audrey Hepburn and George Peppard. Audrey Hepburn plays the role of "Holly Golightly", a sort of good-time girl of the evening. A romance then begins with a neighbor who is a writer, named "Paul", who also happens to be in the same sort of predicament. This film is magical and heart-warming. Hepburn especially singing "Moon River" is enchanting and beautifully unforgettable.

  4. To Kill a Mockingbird ~ 1962 Adapted from the Pulitzer-prize winning novel, of the same name, was written by author Harper Lee. The story is told through the eyes of a young girl, who goes on to question the rules of society. Injustices of the deep-south are explored poignantly. Gregory Peck won an Oscar for best actor and breathed impeccable life into one of the most honorable and decent characters of all time.

  5. Whatever Happened to Baby Jane ~ 1962 A story of two aging silver-screen actresses and their relentless vindication of a life gone by. They attempt to destroy each other through seething emotional lashes and wrenching poison-filled words. The incomparable Bette Davis is paired with the mutually gifted Joan Crawford in the superbly-matched venomous death rounds. Bette Davis was nominated for an Oscar for best actress.

  6. The Hustler ~ 1961 In the "Hustler", Paul Newman brings to the big screen a slick and scheming "Fast Eddie". A sharp-shooting, pool-shark who manages to travel from hall to hall on the prowl for an endless supply of eagerly waiting chumps. Jackie Gleason, Piper Laurie and George C. Scott illuminate the screen with their presence. The argument is definitely made in favor of the age-old saying "Winning isn't Everything".

  7. A Hard Day's Night ~ 1964 A film that intertwined music and comedy deliciously. The Beatles, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, play caricatures of themselves. Well, sort of. The audience is shown what the day in the life of a hugely successful pop band would look like. Hilarious chaos then ensues. A feel-good piece of music history that has to be experienced. Beatles fans will undoubtedly enjoy reliving.

  8. Doctor Zhivago ~ 1965 The forever sophisticated and handsome Omar Sharif stars in one of the greatest screen epics ever filmed. World War I from a Russian perspective. A magical love-story that joins two soul-mates in a most poignant and moving bond. Robert Bolt won the Oscar for best screenplay.

  9. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? ~ 1966 From the Broadway stage to the big screen. Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor sizzle together in every scene. Their iconic talent lights up the theater like no other pairing. Hard-hitting dialog and sharp mental sparring extraordinaire. Elizabeth Taylor won an Oscar that year for best Actress.

  10. The Graduate ~ 1967 A bit risqué for the times. The Graduate pushed the envelope with a provocative and forward-thinking screenplay. Dustin Hoffman plays the naive and innocent college grad, "Benjamin Braddock", relentlessly hunted by the boozing bored and much older housewife, "Mrs. Robinson", played superbly by Anne Bancroft. Mike Nichols won the Oscar for best director. Scandalously humorous. Simon and Garfunkel wrote and performed the musical score, which included classic hits such as "Mrs. Robinson", "The Sounds of Silence", and "Scarborough Fair".

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