George Washington - Follower of Jesus Christ

The father of our nation was quiet about his Christian faith. But there can be no doubt his faith in our Lord Jesus Christ was deep and heartfelt. In his first general order to his troops, General George Washington called on ...

Every officer and man...to live, and act, as becomes a Christian Soldier defending the dearest rights and liberties of his country.

On May 14, 1787, George Washington warned the delegates to the Constitutional Convention:

If to please the people, we offer what we ourselves disapprove, how can we afterward defend our work? Let us raise a standard to which the wise and the honest can repair; the event is in the Hand of God!

President George Washington, on April 30, 1789, delivered his famous Inaugural Address to both Houses of Congress. He had just taken the oath of office on the balcony of Federal Hall in New York City, with his hand upon a Bible opened to Deuteronomy, Chapter 28:

Such being the impressions under which I have, in obedience to the public summons, repaired to the present station, it would be peculiarly improper to omit, in this first official act, my fervent supplications to that Almighty Being who rules over the universe, who presides in the councils of nations and whose providential aides can supply every human defect; that His benediction may consecrate to the liberties and happiness of the people of the United States a government instituted by themselves for these essential purposes; and may enable every instrument employed in its administration to execute with success, the functions allotted to his charge.

In tendering this homage to the Great Author of every public and private good, I assure myself that it expresses your sentiments not less than my own; nor those of my fellow citizens at large, less than either.

No people can be bound to acknowledge and adore the Invisible Hand which conducts the affairs of men more than the people of the United States. Every step by which they have advanced to the character of an independent nation seems to have been distinguished by some token of providential agency.

And in the important revolution just accomplished, in the system of their United government, the tranquil deliberations and voluntary consent of so many distinct communities, from which the event has resulted, can not be compared with the means by which most governments have been established, without some return of pious gratitude, along with a humble anticipation of the future blessings which the past seem to presage ...

We ought to be no less persuaded that the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right which Heaven itself has ordained; and since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty and the destiny of the republican model of government are justly considered as deeply, perhaps finally, staked on the experiment...

President George Washington, on October 3, 1789, from the City of New York, proclaimed a National Day of Thanksgiving:

Whereas it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favor...

Now, therefore, I do recommend and assign Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of November next, to be devoted by the people of these Unites States...that we then may all unite unto him our sincere and humble thanks for His kind care and protection of the people of this country previous to their becoming a nation; for the signal and manifold mercies and the favorable interpositions of His providence in the course and conclusion of the late war; for the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty which we have since enjoyed; for the peaceable and rational manner in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national one now lately instituted; for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed...

And also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations, and beseech Him to pardon our national and other transgressions...to promote the knowledge and practice of the true religion and virtue...

Given under my hand, at the City of New York, the 3rd of October, A.D. 1789.

George Washington wrote about what he felt made America great:

It is impossible to rightly govern the world without God and the Bible.

It is impossible to account for the creation of the universe, without the agency of a Supreme Being. It is impossible to govern the universe without the aid of a Supreme Being. It is impossible to reason without arriving at a Supreme Being.

Religion is as necessary to reason, as reason is to religion. The one cannot exist without the other. A reasoning being would lose his reason in attempting to account for the great phenomena of nature, had he not a Supreme Being to refer to.

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Was George Washington a Christian?

Source:Christian Defense Fund

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Comments 8 comments

Curtis Cranfield 7 years ago

From reading this, it seems as though George Washington believed in the one and true God! This is a far cry from the inturpitation that is forced upon us today. Rightings like this should be presented to the main media. Also the new Constitution Party should get a copy of this!


Ian 6 years ago

Wow, a reasoning being would lose reason trying to understand nature without having God to refer to. Therefore without God there is no reason! Praise He who resides as the ruler of heaven!


Minister Fred Hatchett 6 years ago

This shows me that he's more a Mason than a supposed Christian.


Big J 6 years ago

In all the words attributed to Washington in this article there are in fact many references to God and a Supreme Being. However, none of those words display a belief by Washington in the divinity of Jesus of Nazereth. This lack of belief in the divinity of Jesus is a staple of Deism and most Deists of the time still considered themselves Christians because they viewed followed Jesus as a great profit and teacher but not as a divine being.


JimN 5 years ago

If truth matters to those of religion.

==========================================

It is impossible to rightly govern the world without God and the Bible.

* Washington is known to have made some official statements of public piety, but this is not one of them. Though this assertion is very widely reported to have been said in Washington's Farewell Address (17 September 1796), this is not actually the case, as any search of the documents would reveal.

==========================================

* The government of the United States is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion.

o This statement was made by an official representative of the U.S., but is actually a line from the English version of the Treaty of Tripoli of 1796, initially signed by a representative of the US on 4 November 1796 during Washington's presidency, approved by Congress 7 June 1797 and finally signed by President John Adams on 10 June 1797. Article 11 of it reads:

As the government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian Religion,— as it has in itself no character or enmity against the laws, religion or tranquility of Musselmen,— and as the said States never have entered into any war or act of hostility against any Mehomitan nation, it is declared by the parties that no pretext arising from religious opinions shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries.

* Joel Barlow, who had served as Washington's chaplain, and was also a good friend of Paine and Jefferson was the representative in charge of the translation.


Wes 5 years ago

Regarding the deist charge against Washington, he did, in fact, refer to his belief in Jesus Christ on more than one occasion. See statements to Delaware Indians. He also thanked the Methodist Episcopal Bishops for their "intercessions at the Throne of Grace." These are just but two examples. The evidence of his writings make it clear that deism doesn't apply in this case. A well thought out and contextually relevant critique supplies answers for why he didn't act in an evangelical fashion. The atheists and agnostics are simply wrong on the deism question.


calvinlewis 4 years ago

I have struggled for a long time with how most of the Founding Fathers and early Presidents are called Christians. While I have read many speeches and papers from these great leaders, I have generally not been convinced of their belief in the Gospel. I have read many statements about God, Providence, the Creator, and the Almighty. I have read many quotations of and allusions to Scripture. But these do not a Christian make.

No doubt, some of these great men were truly born-again. Also, it is without doubt that a Judeo-Christian ethic derived from the Old and New Testaments is the judicial foundation of this country. Still, I am concerned that many church attenders so easily accept the nebulous God-talk of past and present politicians as a sign of true conversation. I need more information. Is there a resource that details what each of these great men:

1.) believed about the person and work of Jesus Christ,

2.) said publicly about the human-divine person and sacrificial death of Jesus Christ,

3.) demonstrated through repentance, good works, holiness and fellowship with believers, and

4.) did to demonstrate perseverance in this faith till death?

It is one thing to believe that the Bible contains principles for a moral, free and prosperous society. It is another thing to believe in an all-powerful, eternal God. It is another thing to be a church member yet still another thing to believe in the general truthfulness of Scripture. But none of these are the same thing as believing the Gospel.


Teddy 4 years ago

As a Christian leader, he as omitted the words Jesus, Christ, and Christianity from top to bottom in this quotation. He speaks of an Almighty God of whom can be applied to any religion. It seems to me that the man may have been a Christian, though he wasn't going to decided that for everyone else, and their children, and their children's children.

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