National League Cy Young Winners By Year—1970s

 

When you think of National League pitchers in the ‘70s, you think of guys like Tom Seaver and Steve Carlton. And while those guys won a few Cy Young Awards in that decade, there were a few other pitchers who turned in stellar years and won the award. Here is a complete list of those Cy Young winners from the ‘70s:

1979-Bruce Sutter, Chicago Cubs

It was a fairly close vote for the NL Cy Young Award in 1979, as four players received first-place votes. But among Chicago's Bruce Sutter, Houston's J.R. Richard and Joe Niekro, and Pittsburgh's Kent Tekulve, Sutter took the award home. That season, the Cubs' reliever posted 37 saves, and had a 6-6 record with a 2.22 ERA, and 110 strikeouts to just 32 walks in 101 innings of work.

1978-Gaylord Perry, San Diego Padres

Six years after winning the AL Cy Young with Cleveland, Gaylord Perry won the NL Cy Young in 1978 while with San Diego. Perry went 21-6 with a 2.73 ERA, and 154 strikeouts. He had five complete games with two shutouts as well. But once again, what's most remarkable about Perry's season (as was the case with Cleveland in 1972), is that his team only went 84-78, meaning he won a quarter of the Padres' games.

1977-Steve Carlton, Philadelphia Phillies

In 1977, Phils' lefty Steve Carlton won his second NL Cy Young of the decade, and the second of four overall in his career. Carlton went 23-10 with a 2.64 ERA and 198 strikeouts. He also had 17 complete games with two shutouts.

1976-Randy Jones, San Diego Padres

In 1976, three Mets' pitchers received Cy Young votes, but it was San Diego's Randy Jones who took home the NL Award. Jones went 22-14 with a 2.74 earned run average. He wasn't a fastball pitcher, as he only struck out 93 batters. But Jones was effective, notching 25 complete games with 5 shutouts.

1975-Tom Seaver, New York Mets

In 1975, the Mets' Tom Seaver won his third NL Cy Young Award and second of the decade. Seaver edged out San Diego's Randy Jones by going 22-9 with a 2.38 ERA, and 243 strikeouts to just 88 walks in 280 innings of work. Seaver added 15 complete games with 5 shutouts.

1974-Mike Marshall, Los Angeles Dodgers

In 1974, the year they went to the World Series, the Los Angeles Dodgers had three pitchers earning NL Cy Young votes. But it was reliever Mike Marshall who took home the award. Marshall appeared in 106 games, going 15-12 with 21 saves, a 2.42 ERA and 143 strikeouts.

1973-Tom Seaver, New York Mets

In edging out Montreal's Mike Marshall, Tom Seaver won his second NL Cy Young Award and first of two in the ‘70s. Seaver went 19-10 with a 2.08 ERA, and 251 strikeouts with only 64 walks in 290 innings pitched. He added 18 complete games with 3 shutouts, and helped the Mets return to the World Series.

1972-Steve Carlton, Philadelphia Phillies

In what may have been the finest season of a stellar career, Phillies' ace Steve Carlton won the first of his four NL Cy Young Awards in 1972. Carlton went 27-10 with a 1.97 ERA and 310 strikeouts to just 87 walks in 346 innings pitched. He had 18 complete games with 3 shutouts.

1971-Fergie Jenkins, Chicago Cubs

Though the Mets' Tom Seaver had a lower ERA and more strikeouts, Cubs' pitcher Fergie Jenkins won the NL Cy Young in 1971 because he simply won more games. Jenkins went 24-13 with a 2.77 ERA, and 263 strikeouts to only 37 walks in 325 innings pitched. He added a career high 30 complete games with 3 shutouts. And with the Cubs only winning 83 games that season, Jenkins accounted for more than a fourth of those victories.

1970-Bob Gibson, St. Louis Cardinals

There wasn't a more intimidating pitcher, maybe ever, than Cardinals' ace Bob Gibson. In 1970, Gibson won the NL Cy Young Award, his second, by going 23-7 with a 3.12 earned run average, and 274 strikeouts to just 88 walks in 294 innings pitched. Gibson added 23 complete games with 3 shutouts. Gibson even batted .303 that season with 2 homers and 19 RBI, and won a Gold Glove.

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