New York Jets’ All-Time Rushing Yardage Leaders

The New York Jets began as the Titans in 1960 in the AFL, and won a Super Bowl behind Joe Namath in 1969. But while the Jets have fielded some great teams over the years, they haven’t made it back to the big game in almost 40 years. As you might expect, the Jets have had some great running backs, and here is a list of the all-time Top 10 for them in rushing yards:

Curtis Martin (10,302)—Curtis Martin, who played for the Jets from 1998 to 2005, ranks not only first in franchise history with 10,302 rushing yards. He also ranks fourth all-time in the NFL with 14,101 total yards with the Jets and Patriots. Martin’s best season was 2004, when he was first team All-Pro by rushing for a career best 1697 yards and 12 rushing touchdowns, adding 41 catches for 245 yards and 2 more TDs out of the backfield.

Freeman McNeil (8074)—Freeman McNeil played his entire career for the Jets, from 1981 to 1992, and ranks second in their history with 8074 yards. McNeil had his best season in 1985. That year, he rushed for a career high 1331 yards with 3 rushing TDs, adding 38 catches for 427 yards and two more scores as a receiver.

Emerson Boozer (5135)—Emerson Boozer played his whole career in new York, from 1966 to 1975 and was part of the Super Bowl champion Jets in 1969. Boozer ranks third in Jets’ history with 5135 rushing yards, and his best season was 1973, when he rushed for a career high 831 yards with 3 touchdowns, adding 22 catches for 130 yards and 3 more TDs. Boozer had a career best 11 rushing TDs in 1972 and made the Pro Bowl in 1966 and 1968.

Matt Snell (4285)—Matt Snell played for the Jets from 1964 to 1970, mostly as a fullback, and ranks fourth in team history with 4285 rushing yards. Snell had his best season in 1969 when he was a Pro Bowler. That year, Snell rushed for a career high 948 yards with 5 touchdowns, and added 56 catches for 393 yards (also career best) with one more TD as a receiver.

Johnny Hector (4280)—Johnny Hector was with the Jets his entire career, from 1983 to 1992, meaning he was mostly Freeman McNeil’s backup. But Hector still ranks fifth in Jets’ history with 4280 rushing yards. His best season was 1989, when Hector rushed for a career high 702 yards with 3 touchdowns, adding 38 catches for 330 yards and 2 more TDs out of the backfield. Hector had a career best 11 rushing TDs in 1987 as well.

John Riggins (3880)—John Riggins made his mark with the Redskins, but began his career in New York, playing for the Jets from 1971 to 1975. Riggins ranks sixth in Jets’ history with 3880 rushing yards, and his best season for them was 1975, when he made the Pro Bowl by rushing for 1005 yards and 8 touchdowns, adding 30 catches for 363 yards and one TD as a receiver.

Bill Mathis (3589)—Bill Mathis played for the Titans/Jets from 1960 to 1969 (mostly as a fullback) and ranks seventh in team history with 3589 rushing yards. Mathis had his best season in 1961 when he was first team All-Pro with career highs in rushing yards (846) and rushing touchdowns (7), adding 12 catches for 42 yards and 1 more TD.

Adrian Murrell (3447)—Adrian Murrell began his career with the Jets and played for them from 1993 to 1997. Murrell ranks eighth in Jets’ history with 3447 rushing yards, and his best season was with them in 1996. That year, Murrell rushed for a career high 1249 yards with 6 TDs, adding 17 catches for 81 yards and one more score as a receiver.

Brad Baxter (2928)—Fullback Brad Baxter played for the Jets his entire career, from 1990 to 1995, and ranks ninth in franchise history with 2928 rushing yards. Baxter had a career best 698 rushing yards in 1992, but his best overall season was 1991, when he rushed for 666 yards with a career high 11 touchdowns, with 12 catches for 124 yards.

Scott Dierking (2901)—Scott Dierking played most of his career for the Jets, from 1977 to 1983, and ranks tenth in team history with 2901 rushing yards. Dierking’s best season was 1979 when he rushed for a career best 767 yards with 3 touchdowns, adding 10 catches for 121 yards out of the backfield.

More by this Author


Comments

No comments yet.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working