Live Cheaper Every Day - Small Easy Steps To Saving Money

Saving money one small step at a time isn't painful

When we've let ourselves slide into living habits that don't really work well, we tend to dread changing to habits that work better for us. We think of making the move as a real chore. Sometimes we're right, it's not only a chore, but a downright pain in the neck.

But moving in small steps toward saving money isn't very difficult. As a matter of fact, sometimes it's barely noticeable. So take the small steps. Do one-time activities, or add one habit a week or one habit a month, until the one-time activities are done and the habits are all a part of the daily routine.

Then you can become a money saving expert.

How much money can you save on gas?

A woman fills the gas tank - again.
A woman fills the gas tank - again. | Source

Step 1 - Combine those errands to save money and weekend chores

Because gasoline is a growing expense these days, start by saving what's already in the tank.

Combine any two reasons to drive into one reason to drive. If you're coming home from work, add one errand to your drive home. Unless it's an easy one, don't try to do more than one extra errand after you've already worked a full day, or it'll feel more like a burden.

Give yourself two or three errand add-ons per week, during the part of the week that's easiest for you. For example, if you're more tired towards the end of the week, do two or three errand add-on days during the first part of the week. When you get home and the errand is already done, or the weekend comes and you don't have to do that extra errand, you'll be glad and you'll want to keep doing it.

While you're paying attention to your errands, add having your tires checked for proper inflation to your errand list. Having tires that are either overinflated or underinflated lowers your gas mileage, and it shortens the life of your tires. Be sure to check the inflation occasionally from now on. Many gas stations have a separate paid air pump for checking and inflating tires. (Go during the daylight for this, as they usually aren't properly lighted.)

Step 2 - Heat only what you use

Go around your house this evening and see what doors are open to rooms that are not used, such as a spare bedroom or the door to the basement. Close them and keep them closed. If you have an upstairs with a door on the stairway, the crack at the bottom of the door can act as a chimney draft and suck warm air from the main floor to the unused upstairs. If nobody uses the upstairs until bedtime, close the door and put a draft stopper along the bottom of it.

If you have heaters in every room, turn down the heaters in unused rooms. If you have central heating, the closed rooms will be cooler than the rooms that add to the air flow of the thermostat. However, they will receive heat when the rooms that are still contributing to the thermostat control are being heated. (If you have houseplants, remember them when you're changing the heat in rooms.)

Be sure to turn your heat down at night. A programmable thermostat is a great investment for saving money on central heating bills. They pay for themselves in two-three months of lower heating bills, and you sleep better at night with the room temperature turned down to 55 or 60 degrees. (Seriously, people sleep better in cool rooms.) You can program a low-priced thermostat for a waking time, for leaving for work and returning on some days and being home on other days, and for cooler nights.


Infrared image of the heat loss through a window - how much money are you losing by heating the outdoors?
Infrared image of the heat loss through a window - how much money are you losing by heating the outdoors? | Source

Step 3 - Check those doors and windows

This is a one-time activity. Go around the house and check windows and doors for leaky air. (If you have a lot of doors and windows, you can split the chore in half, so it becomes two activities.) The easiest way to do this is with a lighter or a book of matches. Do it during daylight, so you can see outside if you find a crack.

Look around the frames of doors and windows. If you see any obvious daylight, see how long the open area is. Imagine that long thin line of daylight as a shorter square that's open to the outdoors, and you'll want to close it. (Both shapes let in the same amount of cold air.)

If the bottom of the door lets in cold, get a draft stopper that goes up against the bottom of the door, or under it. (If you buy one that goes under the bottom of the door, you don't have to remind yourself or others to put the draft stopper back in place after the door has been opened and closed again.)

Once you have looked at the seams around a door or window frame, take your lighter or matches to slowly follow the same seam. If the flame moves either away from or toward the seam, you have an air leak and it needs to be sealed. If you want, you can mark these areas with a piece of chalk or a piece of Postit note so you can easily find it again when you have to material to fix it. Be sure also to check any patio doors.

After you've marked the window and door leaks, go to your local hardware store and ask for adhesive foam tape for insulation. If the leak is due to caulking between the window glass and frame, you can buy caulking cord or small tubes of caulking to press into place.

You can use the adhesive foam tape to fix both leaks around your doors and your windows. Just don't place the tape between the edge of the window and where it slides across the frame. However, you can place it where the edge, bottom or top of the window stops against the frame.

If you have very leaky windows, you may want to cover the whole window with plastic sheeting until you can make better, more permanent arrangements. If you cover the whole window, you can either cover your window from the inside with a clear plastic window covering that you can shrink with a hair dryer, or you can do the same to your screens between the window and the screen. I did that for a rental house once, and found that I could cut the plastic to just a little larger than the screen, tape the top edge of the plastic to the inside top of the screen, then put the screen back into place. If you need to cut holes where any latches work on the screen, do that, too. This is amazingly easy, and the screen keeps the plastic in place.

Make a door draft stopper in 5 minutes for about $5 - and save money every time you use it

Step 4 - Watch those on switches - save money by turning on only what you use

Check the lights, appliances, computers and entertainment equipment in the house. What's left on but isn't being used? Start turning things off. Get into the habit of turning things off as they aren't used. As bulbs burn out, be ready to replace them with compact fluorescent bulbs. If you can afford it, buy a battery charger and start using rechargeable batteries. Look for coupons and sales to keep your costs down for both the bulbs and the rechargeable batteries.

If you have children in the house and a partner, you'll need your partner's support for the following project before you start it. Discuss together possible reward options for the children that you can afford.

Then talk to the children. If you check all of the electronics and lights, and nothing is left on, for every day the lights are turned off, the computers are either turned off or hibernated and neither stereos nor TV's are playing to empty rooms, the house gets a reward token. For every night that the house gets a token, the reward value goes up a little. Be sure to find rewards that appeal to all members of the household -even if they have to be split up. Tell them that this is for a limited time, until the habits have a good chance of being adopted. After that, it becomes a demerit system with extra chores attached.

Buy fresh produce locally - save money on fresher food.
Buy fresh produce locally - save money on fresher food. | Source

Step 5 - Be alert at the market - save money by smart shopping

This is the supermarket step. Pay attention to coupons and sales. You can look online for coupons, too. However, don't let coupons make you buy anything that you wouldn't buy anyway, unless it's a change to a lesser expensive brand. The best way to do this is to make your list before you check the coupons, and stick to it.

Don't ever go to the supermarket when you're hungry or upset - you'll be much more likely to buy on impulse and to buy worse foods.

Become persistent at the market about price checking by weight. If you don't know how to read the labels, then have the store manager explain their pricing information to you. (Public relations are part of the job.) Or, better yet, if you see someone who is doing a price comparison, ask if that person will quickly explain it to you. Most people will go out of their way to give you very good local information.

When you do price comparisons, you will quickly see that buying foods already prepared is a very costly thing to do. You aren't just paying for convenience. You're paying through the nose for it. So prepare more at one time and freeze it, and you will have some of the convenience you want without the extra price.

Also, if you have access to bulk purchasing, by all means do it. If you're unsure of the quality of a bulk item, buy only a small amount until you see that it's what you want. If you buy in bulk, you're saving money that you would normally spend on the cost of someone else packaging it.

I've written about buying and freezing both white and brown rice in large batches for use later. It will be much more convenient and healthy than using some prepared version of a rice dish.

When you buy produce, pick it from the back of the stack. That's where the newest produce is placed, and it has been picked over the least by the buying public. When you get it home, it will last longer. Also, produce that is not packaged is better quality. You can pick individual items.

If you buy bananas and they become too ripe, peel and freeze them. I've written about freezing fruit and making healthy snacks or desserts later. This will reduce the waste of fruit in your house, and may help you and your family eat more fruit.

Step 6 - lower your costs by gaving gas money

If you drive long distances on a freeway where you aren't slowed by traffic, slow down anyway. Driving at 65-70 in the right or middle lane will save a lot of gas. (If you have cruise control, you can use it to avoid creeping up to the old, faster speeds.) Also, go at a steady pace when you're in town, and spend as much time as possible with your foot off the gas pedal - coast when you can, to a stop or slowing down for a corner. Trying to speed up and stop, and speed up and stop, causes the engine to use a lot of gas. You can save as much as 30% on your gas mileage by using these techniques.

If you're on the freeway and want to use your air conditioning, go ahead - the wind drag with the windows open counters the gas saving effect of having the air conditioning off.

Water is cheaper when it comes from the faucet

How much money can you save by not buying over-priced water in plastic?
How much money can you save by not buying over-priced water in plastic? | Source

Step 7 - Buy cheaper water

Avoid bottled water. You already pay for water at home, and you don't pay over a dollar per pint! Take it to work in your own container, and refill it at work using the lunchroom sink. If the water tastes bad, buy a container that has a filter built into it.

Buying your own aluminum or stainless steel container for reuse, and buying a water filtering pitcher might seem like a large cost to you up front, but it really won't be. You can get aluminum or steel water bottles at some charitable or advertising events for free. If it feels too expensive to buy a water filtering pitcher new, try your local Goodwill or other secondhand store. If you buy a water filtering pitcher secondhand, clean it, then rinse it out with pure vinegar and let it sit to dry. Pure clear vinegar is a better antiseptic than even alcohol.

Step 8 - Don't let TV make you hungry

Don't watch food commercials on TV! If you want to cut down on the family (and yourself) snacking in the evening, remove those food commercials from your life. If you already use a DVD, fast forward past them.

If not, change channels to a station that you know has no commercials. Don't go back to the channel with the food commercial for at least a minute. Once you start paying attention to food commercials, you will be amazed at how bombarded you are every night with them. You will also become better and better at timing them accurately. They're usually in 15, 30 and 60 second increments.

Two lattes with artistic swirls
Two lattes with artistic swirls | Source

Step 9 - Make your routine a treat at work

For one week, record all food and drink that you purchase outside of your home. If you have a partner, have the partner do the same. Keep that list of costs until you have finished the project.

Then cut that spending in half, and cut it in half again, until you are comfortable with the change. Eating and drinking outside of your home will become more of a treat than a routine.

You can bring your favorite snacks and keep them in your desk, locker or lunchroom refrigerator. You can bring your coffee or tea in a thermos, and keep extra coffee or tea at work ready to prepare. If you are joining people at a fast food restaurant, buy half of your meal and bring half of your meal. For example, bring your drink in an aluminum water bottle, buy your burger or salad, and bring some fruit or some other treat for dessert.

When you and your partner have reached your comfort levels, record again what you buy during the week. Then times it by 52 weeks in a year. You will very likely see thousands saved during the year and it will motivate you to keep bringing your food and drink to work. (If you want to be very precise, you can compare the food and drink that you purchased at the market and brought with you to that you purchased ready-made, but most people already have a feel for that cost.)

Some very expensive clothing can be found in secondhand stores.

How would you like to find this in a secondhand store?
How would you like to find this in a secondhand store? | Source

step Ten - Buy the clothes off someone else's back

Take a detailed tour of the discount clothing stores, second hand stores and consignment shops. You will be amazed at the quality of clothing and other household goods that can be found there, and the prices you pay in comparison to new clothing at the regular department stores.

The main difference between the department stores and the discount stores like Roth's or Marshall's is that you buy pre-season in the department store and you buy in-season in the discount clothing store. Many times it's very easy to find clothes in a secondhand store or consignment shop that were never worn and still have the store tags or have hardly been worn.

You will find that you can not only purchase clothing in the discount clothing stores, but you can purchase a wide variety of household goods. When I want new sheets, I always check the discount clothing store first. I can buy 300-400 thread count sheets for less than half the cost that I would pay in a department store or linen shop.

Tell us how you feel about used clothing

Would you buy clothing that someone else has owned?

  • I would if it was good clothing at a great price and lightly used
  • I wouldn't if it had been worn, but would if it still had the price tag on it
  • I would never buy used clothing, even if it hadn't been worn.
  • I would not buy used clothing for myself, but I would buy it for my children
See results without voting

You know even more ways to save money

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Comments about Living Cheaper Every Day- Small Steps to Saving Money 65 comments

Sherry Hewins profile image

Sherry Hewins 4 years ago from Sierra Foothills, CA

You have some good advice, I love the video of the draft stopper for under the door. I'm makin' 'em for all my doors.


TFScientist profile image

TFScientist 4 years ago from Peterborough, UK

A very eclectic series of tips and ideas to save money - thanks for sharing! Voted up, useful and shared.


Pcunix profile image

Pcunix 4 years ago from SE MA

I'll just add one thing for cold climates: bubble wrap for the worst exposed windows.

I know, it sounds silly, but Google it (I have a hub about it too, but you can find other sources). It actually adds R value and you can feel the difference instantly and you still get light. If you need to peek out, you just peel a little back..


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thank you, Sherry. I found this type after a couple of years of using the one where you have to remember to put the draft stopper back after you open and close the door. It's so much more convenient.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thank you, TFScientist. I've been enjoying your hubs, too.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Great idea, Pcunix. I use top down-bottom up blinds, where the cell structure helps with insulation, too. However, for those windows where I seldom ever open the blinds, it would work perfectly! Thanks for adding to the info here. And, yes, folks, he writes great hubs.


Pcunix profile image

Pcunix 4 years ago from SE MA

We use bubble wrap. blinds, shades AND drapes - all on each window :)


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Wow, it must really get cold where you are. Here in the Willamette Valley, the typical winter day is in the 40's, and the night in the 30's. We do get colder, but not that often.


Simone Smith profile image

Simone Smith 4 years ago from San Francisco

Excellent, excellent advice! I'm pretty frugal, so I've been doing most of these things for ages, but recently gave your tip on lowering heating costs by ONLY heating specific areas (and at specific times) and it has cut my gas and electric bill by around 30%. Hurrah!


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thank you, Simone. I've been reading your hubs, too, and enjoying them tremendously.

I had been doing all of the standard tips for lowing heating bills, and thought I was doing pretty well in keeping my heating cost down. Then I received my bill! I realized that I had to do even more. So I've trimmed the number of rooms that the thermostat has to control. The difference is amazing.


Sherry Hewins profile image

Sherry Hewins 4 years ago from Sierra Foothills, CA

Be careful with that one though. If you have forced air central heating, (mine uses propane, with an electric blower) closing too many vents can cause it to shut down. I had to call a repairman for mine, he said not to close more than one vent.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thanks for the tip, Sherry. Because I live where the air conditioning is only needed about 2 weeks per year maximum, I tend to not look at that side of house costs. Also, here in middle Oregon, I can get away with only using an air conditioner in a single room - my bedroom, so the heat doesn't keep me from sleeping at night.


Mombaxxx1 4 years ago from Oregon

I enjoyed reading your hub and concur that consignment clothing is a boone to one's closet. I loved taking my freshly cleaned dresses and sweaters to the consignment store and I was happy to get the calls saying they had sold several items then ask me to come pick up a check or shop for something different for myself. I had the distinct joy of seeing my wedding dress sell for more than I paid for it just a year before. Keep the interesting hubs coming. I enjoy your wit and wisdom.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thank you Mombaxxx1 for your kind words. Consignment shops are so fun! These shops help me to get rid of clothes that I don't want anymore,but might otherwise hang on to, just because they are still in great condition. And then I go shopping and get someone else's clothes that are still in great condition. It's like shopping in another woman's closet, always an interesting place to look!


Robie Benve profile image

Robie Benve 4 years ago from Ohio

Great hub, I totally agree with all your advice. Voted useful and up. Ciao! :)


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thank you, Robie! I appreciate your support.


theking2020 4 years ago

Is surprising how around us there's so many things that we can do to save money.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Isn't that true, theking2020? While I don't keep my eye on it constantly, I do enjoy the challenge of keeping expenses down. I was raised by "waste not want not" people, and am finding that, gee, they were right! Thanks for stopping by, and for your comment.


SouthernHoney profile image

SouthernHoney 4 years ago from Woodinville, WA

This is a practical and useful hub, Healthy Pursuits. I think these practices are positive even if saving money isn’t a top priority - consuming less is an all-around good and healthy idea.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thank you, SouthernHoney. I agree with you. I'm all for reducing consumption as well as saving money.


cost-segregation profile image

cost-segregation 4 years ago from USA

Thank you for sharing nice information about saving money .

After reading your HP, i am trying to save some money and going to fix on banking sector.


Flightkeeper profile image

Flightkeeper 4 years ago from The East Coast

These are such great ideas and one that I can incorporate easily a little at a time. Thanks Healthy Pursuits.


Flightkeeper profile image

Flightkeeper 4 years ago from The East Coast

The DIY draft guard for the door was also a great tip. Thanks.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thank you, Flightkeeper. It's amazing how many small changes can add up to big savings.


heathersgreatcat profile image

heathersgreatcat 4 years ago from Charlotte, NC

Such great tips! Sometimes we forget that there are little things we can do around the house to save BIG!!!


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thank you, heather. Now that I'm in saving mode, there are savings all over the place!


Silva Hayes profile image

Silva Hayes 4 years ago from Spicewood, Texas

I watched the video for the DIY draft stopper and I am going to make one for our front door. I drive carefully, no "jackrabbit" startups from the traffic light, combine errands, close off rooms not in use, shop carefully at the supermarket, etc. Some people may not be aware that the little white tags on the shelf in front of an item show the cost per ounce of the different sizes, so by reading that, you can determine which size of an item is the better buy. Another thing I do is use clean paper towels for more than one purpose. I wash lettuce and spinach and drain it on paper towels. Then I fold the paper towels, damp but still clean, into squares and leave them on the counter for the rest of the evening. I might grab one to mop up a spill on the floor, or wipe the stove top when I'm through cooking, or dust the edges of the oven door and dishwasher before I throw the paper towels away. Voted your hub UP and useful!


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thank you, Silva, for the vote up and for the great additional tips!


Silva Hayes profile image

Silva Hayes 4 years ago from Spicewood, Texas

Here's a couple more. When you have small leftovers, such as a few green beans, carrots, rice or potatoes, not enough for another meal, freeze them and eventually make a hearty vegetable soup and throw them in it. Make your own vegetable broth by carefully washing your vegetables before peeling and then throw the peels and the ends of carrots and the like into a pot along with water and plenty of onion and simmer to make a broth. Strain into a container, freeze and use as a base for the soup.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

I make broth from peelings and it really works great. Thanks again, Silva.


Kris Heeter profile image

Kris Heeter 4 years ago from Indiana

These are all great tips! I like the DIY door draft guard. I had one in my first apartment and it made a huge difference in the winter! Voted up:)


alifeofdesign profile image

alifeofdesign 4 years ago from New Hamphire

Super helpful tips in your hub and nothing that is too difficult to achieve or to make a person feel cheated. Consider saving a game of sorts.

With a little bit of effort (like plugging drafts) a great deal of money can be saved. Shopping secondhand? Some of the nicest clothes can come from a thrift shop and accessories, too.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Hello, alifeofdesign. With my change in lifestyle, one that requires me to be more frugal, I've come to enjoy the art of saving an extra bit here and there. Thanks for your added suggestion.


dobo700 profile image

dobo700 4 years ago from Australia

Some really useful tips here, thanks. Its always the little things that make the difference.


Hyphenbird profile image

Hyphenbird 4 years ago from America-Broken But Still Beautiful

Thanks for the great tips. Some of these I already do but I learned more. I am going to try the bubble wrap also. I like the plastic in the screen idea best. That saves so much work!


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thanks for stopping by, dobo700, and for the nice comment.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

I know what you mean about the work of putting plastic over screens, Hyphenbird. That used to be a real chore for me until I decided to do the shortcut.


ElleBee 4 years ago

These are great ideas to help save money - many of which I already do! I was just thinking the other day we should turn the vent off in one of the rooms we don't use. But we already keep our heat to between 60-62 normally, so I'm not sure how much of a difference it would make! In my area they sell those compact bulbs at Goodwill pretty inexpensively (usually $1 - which is not bad when you consider how long the bulb lasts). Some of the local gas & electric companies sell htem inexpensively to residents as well.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thank you, ElleBee. I have made some fine-haired decisions like whether or not to close a vent in an already closed room. I finally decided that when I debate on something like that, I'll go to the frugal side. Once I thought it would make no difference and it made a fairly large one. So who knows?


David R Bradley profile image

David R Bradley 4 years ago from The Active Side of Infinity

These are some great suggestions. Once I am able to get these concepts dialed in, what would you suggest for creating more income? I've always felt, that while it's vital to use money wisely, that spending isn't necessarily the problem, rather the issue is income. If you have the cash, you don't have to worry - what would you suggest for creating additional prosperity?


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Actually, David, spending IS necessarily at least a part of the problem. As someone who used to have a high income and didn't spend very wisely at that time, I can tell you that if you don't keep what income you have, you can be just as badly off as if you had never made it in the first place. So, before anything else, don't live up to your income unless your income is low and you have no choice. I've had a long working life, and have worked for companies that have closed or downsized. I can tell you that having that extra cash when you hit a rough spot makes all the difference.

As for making money, I have not yet found the perfect, safe way to guarantee making money without interruption. So I'm not yet qualified to give advice on the topic. :)


Silva Hayes profile image

Silva Hayes 4 years ago from Spicewood, Texas

Good answer. Living up to your income is often a mistake. I too had a high income and now I don't and if I allow myself to look back, there are many expenditures I wish I hadn't made. If I had saved the money instead, it would come in handy now. I don't have a good answer, David, but I will follow this thread with interest in the hope that someone else does.

To bring in temporary, sporadic cash here and there, we took a good look around at "stuff" we have accumulated and no longer use. For example, my husband had a Harley Davidson that he fitted with many custom options. He went through the garage and storage shed and gathered all the original parts and we listed them on eBay and made several hundred dollars. I did the same with hobby and craft items I don't need, and our granddaughters sold lots of things they no longer play with -- Barbies, electronic gadgets that have been replaced with their iphones, etc. I make extra money by selling handmade items on Etsy, and we get by. Prosperity (again) would be nice. In the meantime, we will continue to "destash" where possible.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

I did the same thing, Silva, and it made a difference when I needed it. It's amazing how much "stuff" we have that we don't even want anymore. And it has value, too!


Esmeowl12 profile image

Esmeowl12 4 years ago from Sevierville, TN

I came across your hub while updating my "saving money" hub. I learned that there are so many ways people can save money that they haven't even thought of. Great ideas.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Isn't that the truth? Thank you, Esmeowl12, for stopping by.


Kimberly Vaughn profile image

Kimberly Vaughn 4 years ago from Midwest

These are all great suggestions! And, not only are are they good for your wallet, they are also good for the environment!


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

That's right. A real win win. Thanks, Kimberly.


Life Iz Beautiful profile image

Life Iz Beautiful 4 years ago from India

It's a great hub with lovely smart ideas. Very useful.


WealthTitan profile image

WealthTitan 4 years ago from South Africa

Really good advice voted up :)


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thank you, beautiful! Glad I could be helpful.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thanks, WealthTitan.


JanMaklak profile image

JanMaklak 4 years ago from Canada

Great hub post. Some I am doing already and still working on the rest. I have a hard time with used clothes these days.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thanks for stopping by, JanMaklak.


JanMaklak profile image

JanMaklak 4 years ago from Canada

Don't forget about coupons and sale items. Watching extreme couponing on TV makes you wonder how anyone has a grocery bill at all. Personally I use sale items to my advantage and stock up during super sales. I have a combination of LED and compact fluorescent lighting and it saves a bundle. BTW change your faucet washers if they leak. It can cost you a bundle if you're on a meter.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Great additional tips, JanMaklak. Thanks for the comment.


ssjarkin profile image

ssjarkin 4 years ago from Virginia

Thanks for the tips. Interesting hub.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thanks for stopping by, ssjarkin.


SidKemp profile image

SidKemp 4 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

Thanks. These are all good tips. We also keep the AC to 83 in the summer and heat to 68 in the winter, and learn to live comfortably in a wider range of temperature. We also buy an energy-saving LED light-bulb every time an old bulb burns out, so we are reducing electric costs over time.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Great cost savers, SidKemp. My next goal is to replace my old water heater with a tankless. While that isn't cheap, the difference in cost on a monthly basis makes it worth it. Thanks for stopping by.


lanablackmoor profile image

lanablackmoor 4 years ago from New England

Wow, I was about to run out and purchase a door draft stopper from Bed Bath and Beyond. I'm definitely going to try the DIY version. I know I have a few tattered pairs of jeans in the back of the closet somewhere. These are great tips! I try to practice the consolidation of errands into a couple of days whenever possible. Working from home helps, and at least gas prices are starting to lower a little, but it's still important to be more gas conscious than we were before.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

I hope you have fun making your draft stopper, lanablackmoor. A couple of weeks ago, I saw some draft stoppers at my local Target. I remembered my easy draft stopper and gave myself a little pat on the back for saving money. It's fun, isn't it, to make those little changes and to have better control of how much money we spend.


Silva Hayes profile image

Silva Hayes 4 years ago from Spicewood, Texas

I made your draft stoppers and they work great. I used some old bath towels. Just in time for the cold winter weather. Thank you.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Old bath towels are a great idea, Silva! And I'm glad you like them. Thank you for stopping by and for doing the project.


drpennypincher profile image

drpennypincher 3 years ago from Iowa, USA

Great tips! I especially agree with not purchasing bottled water: 1) it's expensive 2) most if it is simply bottled city water anyway- you can get almost free tap water at home and 3) it comes in a one-time use plastic bottle.


Healthy Pursuits profile image

Healthy Pursuits 3 years ago from Oregon Author

Thank you for the supporting comment, drpennypincher. We need to get plastic out of our disposal stream. It's good for both our pocketbooks and the environment.

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