Finance 101-Ten Lessons About Money

Abundance is like the ever flowing ocean

Abundant thinking, NOT 'lack' thinking is what creates a flow of financial energy.
Abundant thinking, NOT 'lack' thinking is what creates a flow of financial energy. | Source

Early Lessons About Money

Anyone can learn to have a working knowledge of finances without a degree in business or economics. All it requires is an open mind, a willingness to understand, and steadfastness to practice what you learn.

My father was my first financial adviser. My siblings and I did chores, he paid our allowance and he told us to save our money. It was that simple. Except some of my brothers did not learn that lesson and therefore, did not have any money saved by the time they graduated. Dad called that instant gratification vs. delayed gratification.

Lesson #1: Invest in yourself by saving your money.

By the time I was eighteen I had saved enough money, through allowance and babysitting, to buy a ticket to California. It was spring break and my first travel experience outside of family road trips which, in my opinion, did not count for any real travel. Real travel was flying in an airplane. It was my first time on a plane and I was bitten by the travel bug.

My father also taught us to tithe. I was raised in a Catholic home where we were given miniature money envelopes just like the adults. We were expected to give up some of our allowance each week for the collection of gifts. I recall once complaining to my father about how it wasn’t leaving me enough for what I wanted to buy for myself. That brought a lecture about overhead costs, giving to the poor, and the blessings of God.

Lesson #2: Invest in the Lord and you shall be blessed tenfold.

By the time I graduated I wasn’t afraid to earn my living, was eager to be on my own, and worked for the city of Utica, Michigan in my first ‘real’ job. I wasn’t just paid cash by the parents of the children I babysat for; no, I was receiving an honest to goodness paycheck. It was all of $1.65 in those days. Regardless, I was excited to see the numbers printed across the top of the check. It was mine and it was valued because I had worked for it.

Lesson #3: Take pride in what you do no matter how menial or how meager the pay.



Financial Lessons Later in Life

Flash forward to adulthood and the lessons have continued. My teachers have changed through the years and include The School of Hard Knocks; books about the laws of attraction and money management; television financial gurus such as Suze Orman; and community education classes about financial planning.

In other words, in the course of growing up I made financial mistakes, created debt, created wealth, continued learning and applying the financial lessons. Some of the life lessons have been temporary roadblocks. Others have been a real boon to learning the value of money.

Lesson #4: Money has energy and is a commodity that is to be valued in its own place.

Lesson #5: Money has an emotional charge that will haunt you if you allow it to.

Lesson #6: Make your money work for you.

One of the most interesting classes I took was through a unity church I attended while living in Michigan. It helped open my awareness to what money meant to me-it’s emotional content and my belief system about it. It explored early impressions within the family structure and my relationship between money and my value or self worth.

Have you ever inquired about what thoughts you may hold about money? Early childhood imprints are powerful and lasting. Some of the beliefs I discovered I was left with include:

Blessed is the poor; God loves the poor.

Wealth=greed; greed is a sin.

Be grateful for what you have, (don’t ask for more, including a raise).

Be grateful for what you get, (settle for what is offered, don’t negotiate your wage).

There is never enough; I am not enough.

I cannot create my own wealth; my world is a world of lack, not abundance.

An important part of financial freedom is learning what beliefs anchor you to something that is no longer fitting or beneficial. An archaic belief system will hold you back and not allow you to prosper.

Another turning point in my life was when I read the book: How to get out of debt, stay out of debt, and live prosperously by Jerrold Mundis. It was not only life changing for me, again challenging my old thinking process; but, it was beneficial for several of the friends I had who were also in debt. The lessons learned from this book have stayed with me to this day.

Important Financial Strategies

What I know now is that money is flexible and cannot be in control of me. Rather, I control the money I earn. Along with this realization is the knowledge that I create my relationship with money through what I value-and it isn’t ‘things’ that matter in life.

Lesson #7: My pay will be equal to what I believe I deserve and am worth.

Lesson #8: Don’t buy on credit what you can’t pay off within the month.

Lesson #9: The older we are the harder it is to ‘start over’ again.

Lesson#10: Wise money management allows one to plan for the future without fear.

Each year I plan my goals in the areas that I feel will be beneficial to me. One of these areas is financial. Although the goals themselves may be modified at times, they are basically the same two every year: for fiscal health and well-being; and for financial freedom.

We each have our own ideas about financial freedom and the lifestyle which is important to us. No one has the right to judge what we value when it comes to our finances. However, it is important, necessary and a sign of real maturity to account for our money and use it in responsible ways. It is to each of our benefits, therefore, to learn all we can about finances.

Becoming Informed

We become informed through books that increase our understanding about the subject of finances. We can also learn about investments through classes, either online or in a classroom. In addition, there are countless television programs or DVD’s that have tutorials for our education. Be smart; stay alert to how your money works for you, but also, be brave; examine what your relationship is to money and what your beliefs and childhood messages are. It is often the covert agenda buried deep within our consciousness that repels us from our greatest good. While affirmations will not resolve these issues, they can work in mysterious ways to connect us with a source that opens us to more than what our minds are capable of imagining for us. Here are a few that may begin this process for you. Say them aloud several times a day and note any changes that may occur in your life. Keep a journal of the gifts and changes that occur.

I am abundantly provided for.

All of my needs are lovingly met.

I create for myself a world of abundance.

I am open to receiving all of God’s blessings.

I am open to receiving all that God offers.

I am worthy to receive all of the abundance that God bestows upon me.

May you prosper in the New Year with wisdom and gifts of peace, love, joy and charity.



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Comments 11 comments

richtwf profile image

richtwf 5 years ago

You were fortunate to be blessed with a father who instilled into you a good philosophy towards money management. Many people these days have problems managing their finances because they neither had parents who taught them money basics nor had lessons in school.

Being able to manage our finances well is something which should be taught in school and indeed some banks in the UK now do give presentations to children on basic money management awareness. About time!

My parents being Chinese have the philosophy - Work hard and save hard for family and the future and it's like delayed gratification I suppose. Fortunately I got that habit unlike my two younger siblings.

I think when we were younger, we all were given the impression that money is evil, but I've actually learnt that wealth is not actually evil but the love of money is. If we've worked hard and honestly and we're not driven just for the sake of having more money then that's fine. I believe that a man who knows that enough is enough will always have enough (Lao-Tzu). There are those who sadly fear that they don't have enough so are driven to wanting more but can never be satisfied.

One last thing I'd like to share is that money can act as a magnifier. If you're happy and more money comes your way then it magnifies your happiness and likewise if you're already unhappy and more money comes your way then you become unhappier. You just have to look at some of the saddest people in the world - a lot of them have a lot of money yet are they always happy?

One last quote for you: Money is an excellent servant but a poor master! You can tell what God thinks of money - Just look at those who have got the most!

Enough from me!

An awesome and very useful hub Denise and another one down! Keep going and God bless!


Denise Handlon profile image

Denise Handlon 5 years ago from North Carolina Author

Rich, wonderful feedback and sharing. Thank you so much-I really treasure your words. There is alot of wisdom to what you've written. As for the children's lessons about money, I totally agree with you. I wish schools had programs like that.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 5 years ago from The Midwest, USA

Denise, this is a great hub, thank you for sharing. I like how your dad started with his kids.. having them do chores, giving an allowance, and then having them save the money. Later to think of others through tithing to the church, etc,how great to have such a great start. My parents did it very similar.


Happyboomernurse profile image

Happyboomernurse 5 years ago from South Carolina

This was a great hub, Denise, and another one down for your goal of 30 hubs in 30 days. You certainly aren't skimping on quality in your attempt to increase the quantity of hubs that you write.

My parents were good people but poor examples of fiscal responsibilty. I learned what not to do from them, and then educated myself in all the ways you mentioned in this hub. Fortunately, there's a lot of good information on this topic if one is inclined to seek it.

I also agree with the insightful comments that Richtwf and oceansnsunsets left.


Denise Handlon profile image

Denise Handlon 5 years ago from North Carolina Author

Hi OnS-It must have been that midwestern upbringing-my dad was a blue collar worker in Detroit until we moved into the burbs. Thanks for your comments.

Gail-One can learn from a variety of examples. Your experience was another way. It is very fortunate for the variety of info. I was much older before I sought that. I'm always amazed at Suze Orman's personal story of financial disaster.

Great feedback here from all of you. Thanks for the support.


vocalcoach profile image

vocalcoach 5 years ago from Nashville Tn.

Oh, how I wish this article was given to me to read as a teenager. My internal messages were deeply rooted as a result of what I learned at home. I imagine I have plenty of company here. A very valuable hub. I love the affirmations. Also, I thoroughly enjoy reading all of the comments. It has taken me a life-time to learn how to manage my finances. But then, it has taken me a life-time to learn how to do many things and I am most grateful for articles like this one. Thank you so much and God Bless.


Denise Handlon profile image

Denise Handlon 5 years ago from North Carolina Author

Hi Audrey. I agree with EVERYTHING you said in your comment. Ditto, ditto, ditto. I'm an old but wiser woman now. And, so it is... that is maturity and the circle of life.


Rastamermaid profile image

Rastamermaid 5 years ago from Universe

This is awesome! Perfect timing for me to explain to my pre-teen.

It's one thing to speak on it but added visuals help and I'll be using this.

Thanx for sharing!


Loretta Giacoletto 5 years ago

Your father was a wise man, Denise. I know this from personal experience.


Denise Handlon profile image

Denise Handlon 5 years ago from North Carolina Author

Yes, Aunt Loretta, he was. And, I miss him very much. Yesterday was his birthday. Thanks for the comment.


Denise Handlon profile image

Denise Handlon 2 years ago from North Carolina Author

Hi Darien-what a nice comment you left here, thank you. I'm glad the article has given you some inspiration in whatever way you can use it. I'll send an email out to you today, (7-14-14) and you can respond whenever. My work schedule varies, but eventually I will check my mail.

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