Five Things I Don't Like about Retirement

Retirement

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Golfers

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My Retirements

Since April 1 of 2014, I have been retired from full-time work. Prior to April of 2014, I had taught English at Thai schools in the Bangkok area since August of 2007. My more than six years of full-time teaching followed my first retirement from full-time United States government service in April of 2007.

In April of 2007, I wasn't happy retired because I felt too young to stop working, and also because I had not realized my dream to teach English in a Thai school. Now having started my second retirement in 2014, I still feel too young to accept full-time retirement at home.

In this hub, I will first note the few things good about retirement, and then list five items that I dislike about being retired.

Good Things about Retirement

Retirement can be a special treasured time for most people if it is taken at the appropriate time and under correct conditions. For the individual who enjoys being on the golf course every day or devoting his whole day to interests, hobbies, and friends and family, you can't beat retired life. Furthermore, without any constraints on time, a retiree has all the time in the world to spend with family and friends, or to travel anywhere at any time.

Money

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Weekend

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Friends

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Volunteering

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An Old Grandmother

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Five Things I Don't Like about Retirement

Retirement, however, is not completely the great time portrayed in many books, ads, and pictures. It can be a trying and disappointing time for a person who still feels young to work, doesn't have enough hobbies and interests, and lacks social interaction.

Let me now specifically list five things I dislike about retirement.

1. Living on Reduced Fixed Income

Although it is possible to still live comfortably in Thailand on my government pension and social security benefits, I really miss my monthly teaching salary. It was two-thirds of my present retirement income and certainly very difficult to walk away from. With this extra salary, I had more disposal income which I could often save or invest.

2. Every Day Is Monotonous

Since being retired, I have the feeling that every day is the same. There are no longer any TGIFs, weekends, or holidays to look forward to. In a way, I miss this and the structure of working fixed hours Monday through Friday and having weekends and holidays off.

3. Reduced Social Interaction

Social interaction with teaching colleagues and students is one of the things I have missed the most since being retired. Although I do have a few expat and Thai friends in Udorn, I still miss being at school and working and socializing with students, teachers, and administrators.

4. Feeling of Being Useless to Society

Since accepting retirement in March of 2014 and effectively letting myself be "put out to pasture," I feel like I have lost my usefulness to society. In my status now with a retirement visa in Thailand, I am prohibited from even doing volunteer teaching and other work. Perhaps my writings on the Internet will be useful to some people. I believe, however, that I can be more useful to society by continued teaching and perhaps consulting work.

5. Feeling of Being Old

When I was still teaching, I felt young because I was working and socializing with younger people almost every day. It was easy to keep abreast of the latest trends in pop culture just by being with my students. I no longer dye my hair now, and feel like I am aging and stagnating as an old person in my retirement.

Retirement Living

What do you dislike the most about retirement living?

  • Being on a reduced fixed income
  • Every day is the same
  • Reduced social interaction
  • Feeling of being useless to society
  • Other
See results without voting

Summary

Retirement certainly has its advantages; however, for some people like me who really didn't retire voluntarily, it can be trying and unpleasant.

Five Things I Don't Like about Retirement

Cast your vote for Five Things I Don't Like about Retirement

© 2014 Paul Richard Kuehn

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Comments 72 comments

Rota profile image

Rota 23 months ago

Im far from retirement but i have heard it can be trying. Perhaps creating a daily schedule might help. We can become used to having our schedule created for us at work and it can be easy to feel like you have no structure without it. I am currently not working and i have found that making a schedule helps.


nanospeck profile image

nanospeck 23 months ago

Good article about retirement


peachpurple profile image

peachpurple 23 months ago from Home Sweet Home

how old are you? Most people retired after age 65, sit back and relax, enjoy a cup of tea, gardening and spoil your grandkids. Look for a silver lining over retirement


Austinstar profile image

Austinstar 23 months ago from Somewhere in the universe

I've been retired on a disability since the age of 59 which is really too early to retire. But since I had worked starting at age 12, I did put in the years.

Basically, I have been recovering for 3 years now. I feel strong enough to go back to work part time, but no one wants to hire old people. What a waste of resources.

There just isn't much else to do except the internet and my hobbies. Oh well, sigh.


Doodlehead profile image

Doodlehead 23 months ago from Northern California

Hi Paul-

I "retired" about five years ago for about six months, and was BOMM (Bored outa my mind). Since then I have gotten my MBA and completed my HTML5 development certificate through the junior college. Taking online computer classes is a blast and there are lots of "retired" people who are very highly educated doing this who have many or no goals in mind. For example one of my recent classmates is/was a lawyer who is a webmaster for an interdenominational spiritually based website. There were other equally diverse people in my classes and we got to know each other online.

In your case, perhaps online English teaching may appeal to you. A retired teacher friend of mine is thinking of setting up one of those online teaching academies. A colleague of mine actually has a school (it may be in Thailand) and he spends 9 months in Thailand and three months in the US during Medicare enrollment season.

I have read there is lots of demand for independent English teaching to business people in some countries. Is this true of Thailand?

You probably have several ideas already in your mind about what to do.

Enjoy!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 23 months ago from North Texas

When it comes to staying busy and feeling useful men and women usually differ. PSYC research shows that men must feel useful and productive and that they are making a worthwhile contribution of some sort, where most of us women have no such requirements.

Not wishing to be alarming, but the studies show that unless men can meet their needs as described above, they die. So I hope you will find a way to contribute in a way that satisfies you and soon. No private tutoring allowed?

I remember reading in one of your articles that you would never be able to come back to the states because you have been away so long and now have a completely different life and lifestyle, and coming back here would of course affect your family too. Here you could continue teaching as long as you wanted to. It makes no sense that you are forbidden to teach any longer. I hope you are giving serious thought to a solution and making progress with that goal.

Hoping 2015 will be a great year all year long for you and yours and that the perfect solution to your dilemma will be found. Sharing this article on HP and voting it up and UI.


Barbara Kay profile image

Barbara Kay 23 months ago from USA

I agree with the points you make. My husband just retired in October. It is better to have something that makes you feel you are helping others. When he retired, it made me feel older too. At the time I was 62.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&Au fait Thank you very much for your very insightful comments. Too often in my life, I have done things in life to my detriment to make other people happy. If I would have fought it with threats of lawsuits demanding severance pay, I most probably could have stayed on at my school in Bangkok. I am not getting complete satisfaction writing on the Internet, so I most probably will go back to some kind of teaching when the new term starts in May of next year. I just am not that happy spending most of my day at home now. Thanks for sharing this article and voting it up.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

Thank you very much for your comments which I can relate to. I most probably will come out of complete retirement next year.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

Thank you very much for your great ideas. Online English teaching sounds appealing and I will have to check it out. Getting a Masters in Education online also sounds like a good idea, and I still think at my age I could put it to use for the next 10-15 years provided that my health stays good. Freelance English teaching to businessmen was my bread and butter when I lived in Taiwan in the 70s. Perhaps I could still make a go of it.


Doodlehead profile image

Doodlehead 23 months ago from Northern California

Hi Paul---Oh, I forgot to mention that a friend of mine uses Skype to teach English online. That way she can see the student and vise-versa and it does not seem so impersonal. Good luck!


BlossomSB profile image

BlossomSB 23 months ago from Victoria, Australia

I made a timetable, as I would have at school when teaching, and put it up on my notice-board. At first I used it quite a bit, especially as I can hear a school bell from my home, but now I hardly ever refer to it, as life is so busy - there just isn't time to fit everything in! Now how did that happen? Maybe I'm getting slower! Love your hub.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

#Rota You are absolutely correct. A daily schedule would be very useful and certainly add structure to my day. Thank you very much for your comments.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&nanospeck Thank you very much for your positive comment! I'm very happy that you liked my retirement article!


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 23 months ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Hello Paul - Lots to think about in your Hub. I just turned 60 (teach history on the university level in Georgia) and my health is pretty average ((family history is pretty foreboding), but I hope to teach until 67 in order to earn the maximum SS retirement benefit.

If I retire then, I believe I would face the say difficulties as you do. Once my children were grown and out of the house (10 years ago) I started teaching part-time during the summer. I didn't like two months with no structure - I had "goals" and "lists" but very little got done and I became mildly depressed. It was not good for me at all. I am sorry you are having a hard time and I hope meaningful work is soon a part of your life again. Blessings. Sharing.


mary615 profile image

mary615 23 months ago from Florida

I was forced into early retirement from a job I had for 15 years. The biggest thing I miss is that wonderful paycheck! I'd had to learn to live even more frugally. I do have a wonderful family living nearby, so they keep me busy.

I hope 2015 will be a good year for you.


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 23 months ago from New York

I can relate all too well with your forced retirement. I dreaded it and still resent being forced to retire before it was time. Only two more years would have made a huge difference in my pay but it was not my choice.

So, I've made the best of it. Spending time with people I love, writing on HP and a tiny bit of traveling.

I'm not familiar with life in Thailand so I don't know the set up for volunteer work but it sounds like you need to look into all your options. Having a retired spouse helps because we share things and time.

I hope you are able to work things out and find your "retirement niche".

God bless and Happy New Year.

Voted up, useful, and interesting.


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 23 months ago from Wisconsin Rapids

If I had to really consider it, I doubt that I would want to put up with some aspects of my old government job. I was fast becoming the oldest person around. So much for interaction. I could use the money though.


UnnamedHarald profile image

UnnamedHarald 23 months ago from Cedar Rapids, Iowa

For me, the worst thing will be the reduced income. The best will be not having to deal with upper management corporate-types and the increasing BS modern corporations spew on their employees. I thought it was bad in the Seventies and Eighties, but, in comparison, those years were easy-peasy.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&phdast I'm so glad to hear from you and your ideas about retirement. During 2015, I have definitely decided to get back into teaching for a least a few hours each week. Thank you very much for your concern and sharing this hub.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&mary615 Thank you very much for sharing your retirement experiences. I do have some of my wife's family living nearby, so I am not completely isolated. I don't really miss the money that much but do miss teaching and being with young people.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&tillsontitan Thank you very much reading and sharing your experiences about retirement. I will look into all of my options and definitely do more than writing articles on the Internet in 2015. Hopefully I will find my "retirement niche." God bless you and I also hope you have a happy and healthy New Year.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&dahoglund Thank you very much for sharing your experiences. I don't miss the money that much, but do miss doing something which I feel can be useful to society.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&UnnamedHarald Thank you very much for your comments and sharing your ideas about retirement. Yes, it was always hard to live on reduced income.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&BlossomSB I really appreciate your ideas about handling time during retirement. Thank you very much for your comments and I'm happy that you like this hub.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&peachpurple I am 70 now and have worked all of my life. At times I have been a workaholic because I really loved my jobs. The problem is that I only have one grandchild and not that many relatives to keep me busy. I feel that I still have a lot to offer in education and want to really get back to it at least part time. A lot of people over 65 are working. Hillary Clinton is almost 70 and will probably be running for President in 2016!!


MarloByDesign profile image

MarloByDesign 23 months ago from United States

I think volunteering when I retire would be so fulfilling to give back to society. There are so many opportunities locally and places that could really use the help. Just an idea! Happy New Year!


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&Austinstar If I can't get back into teaching in some way this year, there won't be much for me except the Internet and my hobbies. Thank you very much for sharing your experiences.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&MarioByDesign Yes, volunteering will be something I get into in 2015 for sure. This is a great way to give back to society. Thanks for commenting!


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&Doodlehead Yes, I have read about using Skype for teaching online. Thanks once again for your comments!


Kathleen Cochran profile image

Kathleen Cochran 23 months ago from Atlanta, Georgia

I've known many men who just need a place to get up every morning and go to. My uncle used to go "to the office" at a local coffee shop with some other men who were retired. It got their day started. I've also volunteered at my local hospital with many retirees who like having somewhere to go and something appreciated to do at least once a week. When I was an employee of the hospital I learned how much its operation depended on those volunteers. That's why I became one when I "retired" earlier than I'd expected to. In the past four years I've written three books (on Amazon). When I finish this last one, which may well be my last one, I may need to return to some kind of work part time to feel useful. I think the main trouble with retirement is that there are so many things you could do, you end up not doing any of them because you can't make a choice. Good Luck!


DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 23 months ago from Oakley, CA

Excellent points, all, and I agree. It does seem unfair that you are not even allowed to volunteer!'

We are retired and on that fixed income, and it is very difficult. With the ever-increasing cost of everything here in the States, we are lucky to have enough money to go to the grocery store and doctor appointments once the mortgage and utilities are paid. That is the worst part.

Voted up and interesting.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&Kathleen Cochran Thank you so much for your very insightful and useful comments. Yes, volunteering is something I will definitely do this year, and taking on a project like writing a book or doing genealogy research should keep me busy and give me a good feeling. I also will be socializing more with the expat community.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&DzyMsLizzy Thank you very much for reading and commenting on this post. If your fixed income isn't enough for the location where you are living, retirement can really be a financial challenge. Good luck in 2015 and thanks for the votes on this hub.


bdegiulio profile image

bdegiulio 23 months ago from Massachusetts

Hi Paul. I found this hub very interesting as I am at the age where I am starting to think about retirement. I have always felt that I might be bored in retirement and I am trying to prepare to avoid that. I do have a number of current hobbies that I hope to expand on and there are some new ones that I would like to take up. My wife and I also love to travel so I hope to be able to continue traveling in retirement. I know that retirement can be a shock to the system when someone has worked all of their life.

Thanks for helping me to prepare and giving me some valid points to consider and think about.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 23 months ago from California

All very good reasons--We are moving closer to retirement, and I think it will be a difficult transition--the money especially--take care of yourself


Marcy Goodfleisch profile image

Marcy Goodfleisch 23 months ago from Planet Earth

Paul - I agree there are some real challenges to the changes we see when we leave the regular working world. It's just so different - less structure, and a need to fill our hours but often no idea on how to do it. Thanks for the hub!


LoisRyan13903 profile image

LoisRyan13903 23 months ago from Upstate NY originally from Long Island

I think boredom would get to me even if I did go to the gym every day, did my writing and my daily Bible studies. In a way I would look forward to retirement from my current job because of the hours. It would be a cut in pay but I would be saving money because I would be cutting down in gas money from a 75 mile commute. I would probably take up several different hobbies other than my writing. And I would want to get out of the house so I would not feel like a recluse maybe go to different events in my town. Maybe go back to college and take up a class that interests me like Aromatherapy of Photography. If money is not too much of an issue, my husband and I would like to travel. We have Ireland on our Bucket List. I have at least 12 more years to go.


ArtDiva profile image

ArtDiva 23 months ago from Yountville, CA

Retirement living reality is not for the faint of heart. Too easy for those to comment not actually living it. And, far more lonely living on a fixed income limiting socialbility as well. Finding a new purpose in unexpected ways is outside of yourself, to finding the positives in this new year of new beginnings. Good luck with your search!


Availiasvision profile image

Availiasvision 23 months ago from California

That was the most honest article on retirement I have ever read. I think it's a good lesson for all of us, that the grass isn't greener on the other side. There is also a lot to plan for when it comes to looking forward to retirement. There are tons of books on how to financially prepare, but not as many resources on the other aspects of retirement like cultivating social interactions and finding a life purpose.

I'm sad for you that the Thai government doesn't allow you to teach, even as a volunteer. I wish you the best in figuring it all out. Playing golf and sitting on a beach sounds fun, and it is for about a month, but then what? I think it's a good thing that you still want to use your talents and gifts.


Dip Mtra profile image

Dip Mtra 23 months ago from World Citizen

I love being retired. I wanted to retire by 55 but it took me two more years to wind up business and ensure that all employees had a stable future. I have been retired a little over a year now and am enjoying it. I have my 'own' time during the day where I am immersed in things that fascinate me. Evenings we go out socializing and weekends are fun like never before.

My advice? Stop planning and regretting and simply let life flow around you. If you want to work again-do that. If you want to read a book-just do that. Basically, do whatever you wish and don't be a slave to survive. Its finally YOUR time now.


janderson99 profile image

janderson99 23 months ago from Australia on Planet Water

I love retirement. I retired in July and my first step was a 75 day train trip around Europe. I then renovated a beach shack, sold my house, got rid of mortgages. I have recently bought a trailer sailer and intend to tour around the waterways of Australia. I have booked a 10 day bare boat charter in the Whitsundays, North Queensland with the family in July. So retirement is what you make of it IMO.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&Dip Mtra You are absolutely correct with your advice. Life should flow around me and it should be my time to do whatever I like. I'm very happy that you are enjoying your retirement and wish you the best in your future retired years.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&janderson99 Yes, retirement is what you make of it. The thing that ticks me off is listening to people who think that it is time for me to retire. This is a decision which I should solely make for myself. Thank you very much for your insights.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&bdegiulio I'm very happy that you found this hub interesting and informative. Retirement is a big event in life which must be considered fully before taking the leap. No one should be forced to retire and everyone should be completely prepared for this big life change.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&AudreyHowitt Yes, I have found retirement to be a difficult transition primarily because I didn't decide on it by myself and wasn't completely prepared for it. Thanks for your comments!


Dip Mtra profile image

Dip Mtra 23 months ago from World Citizen

Time to retire is when you call it-so when you've had enough, just hang those boots. Age is simply a case of mind over matter. If you don't mind, it really doesn't matter. As someone had said.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&Mary Goodfleisch Thank you very much for your comments. I never realized the real challenges before I retired in March,


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&LoisRyan13903 Thank you very much for reading and your insights about retired life. Enjoy your working years and really have a good plan and be prepared for a retirement which you dictate yourself.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&ArtDiva Thank you very much for your interesting and candid honest remarks about retirement. I really appreciate your wish for good luck as I go on my search.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&Availiasvision I really appreciate your great comments on retirement. Yes, there certainly is very much to plan for before you can say that you are officially retired. Yes, cuyltivating social interactions and finding a life purpose are much more important to me in retirement than financial security.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 23 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&Dip Mtra I entirely agree that the time to retire should be dictated only by yourself. And yes, age doesn't matter as long as you are in good health and are able to do the job. I know a woman who worked for the federal government until she was 85!


moonlake profile image

moonlake 22 months ago from America

My husband couldn't stand being retired so he got part time jobs he loved. It got him out of the house and talking to other people besides me. I think it's very important to talk to other people and stay in contact with friends. My husband drove me crazy at times in the winter when he was home all the time now I wish he was here to drive me crazy again. Vote up.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 22 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

&moonlake Thank you very much for your comments and personal insight about retirement. I agree with your opinions and really appreciate them. Thanks also for the votes.


Thelma Alberts profile image

Thelma Alberts 21 months ago from Germany

I can relate to what you have said here. I am sort of retired as my hubby is retired early because of his chronic illness but he has his painting hobby and he does not need socialization compared to me. Lol! I´m glad internet writing is there for me to keep me busy. Enjoy your retirement Paul. Life is too short to think of what we have missed. Take care.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 21 months ago from Houston, Texas

Hi Paul,

That is amazing that you cannot even do volunteer teaching. In reading all of the comments it appears that you plan to go back to teaching while once again being employed. Whether teaching youngsters or business men or online teaching...at least it appears that you have options.

Being forced to retire is never welcomed. Sounds like the reduction in money is not that big of a problem for you so at least that is good! Best wishes in finding something that you want to do with the rest of your life.

Sharing this as it may be an eye opener for some people considering retirement.


Kiss andTales profile image

Kiss andTales 21 months ago

Wonderful hub on retiring, really you may not being doing the Job you retired from , but that does not mean you have retired of life, there is still much to do and experience. Even if income is limited,

some people pick up more education, coah others in fields of many subjects, consider tour guides, and many subjects fellow hubers share , like taking those special pictures, So many things I can not cover them all, And remember you have an opportunity to be educated by the highest supreme enity of the entire iniverse.

We should daily connect, Because we have to remember he is the oldest senoir there is in age, but that did not stop his creating us .


traveleze profile image

traveleze 21 months ago from Preston

Great Hub!

I am young but i want to say on point 4 Feeling of Being Useless to Society no old person should feel like that, they are the foundation of the society that we live in today, its their time to rest and enjoy

Thanks

Lee


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 21 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

I really appreciate your comments, Peggy! Yes, I miss teaching, but I don't want to go back to it full time. The big thing is settling on some interest which will make me happy for the rest of my life. Thank you very much for sharing this hub.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 21 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

I appreciate your comments very much, Thelma. You are correct in noting that I should not be thinking of what I have missed. It is important to be busy doing something that you really enjoy. I'm happy to know that painting is a rewarding hobby for your husband and that Internet writing is satisfying for you. You take care, too.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 21 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

Traveleze, yes, elderly people are the foundation of the society in which we live today. The problem is that a lot of younger people don't realize this fact. I sincerely appreciate your comments.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 21 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

Kiss and Tales, Thank you very much for your very encouraging and inspiring comments. No, I will never retire from life and will certainly have ways to share my wisdom with others and make peace with God. I'm happy you liked this hub.


nybride710 profile image

nybride710 21 months ago from Minnesota

I'm in my later 40s and actually don't look forward to stopping my freelance writing career. I plan to keep going as long as possible. My father retired from full-time police work at age 50 more than 30 years ago. He doesn't especially have a lot of hobbies either.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 21 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

nybride710, If I had a freelance writing career, I certainly wouldn't let age interfere with how long I intend to write in my life. As long as your mind and health are good, you should be able to write well into your 80s or 90s. Not having a lot of hobbies does hurt once you are retired. I appreciate your comments.


Carolyn M Fields profile image

Carolyn M Fields 4 months ago from the USA

I think you wrote this a while ago. I hope you have found your bliss. I am a firm believer that life is what you make it. I retired from my "full time" job about 5 years ago. It seems that I have never stopped finding things to do, and also things to do have never stopped "finding me." My very first freelance job was just dropped in my lap.

I see you have written many, many hubs. Looking forward to exploring them . . .


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 4 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

I have adjusted more to retirement in the past two years. I have made two trips to the States as well as having travelled to Taiwan and Hong Kong. As you mentioned, the key is keeping busy and finding things to do which give a sense of accomplishment and worth. I hope you enjoy my hubs and I expect to write many more.


BlossomSB profile image

BlossomSB 4 months ago from Victoria, Australia

Well, I can understand your feelings about being retired. I relate especially to the reduced income, and I still miss the interaction with students, but I do love having the time to pursue my hobbies and catch up with friends. We were working in Taiwan when we retired and came back home to Australia to live, but still keep in touch with friends there. The internet is a great boon. Retiring is a big adjustment, but it sounds as if you're enjoying it more now, so the best of luck!


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 4 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

Thank you very much for your comments. As I pursue my hobbies and travel, retired life is getting better for me. My next project is to do genealogy research!


Carolyn M Fields profile image

Carolyn M Fields 4 months ago from the USA

You know about http://home.ancestry.com/

I hope!


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 4 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

Carolyn, I wasn't aware of home.ancestry, but I will check it out. Thanks for the tip!


BlossomSB profile image

BlossomSB 3 months ago from Victoria, Australia

How is that genealogy research going? After my husband died I spent some time tidying mine up, made it into a book, self-published it - and it won a prize! Now I spend lots of time writing and it's great fun.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 3 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand Author

@BlossomSB , I joined Ancestry.com and started my genealogy research in earnest 5 days ago. I am in the process now of starting to find my great-great grandparents who are all from Austria, Switzerland, and Germany. I will have more about it in fuiture hubs.

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    Paul Richard Kuehn (Paul Kuehn)687 Followers
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    Paul is a retired American expat living in Thailand. Besides being an English teacher and translator, Paul likes languages and most sports.



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