Make Money Writing Online: My Balance of Earning and Waiting

Writing online is time-consuming, but fun. I'm definitely doing this for a number of reasons -- to express myself, to explore my interests and research fascinating topics, and also to earn online passive (and active) income. I've mentioned in other articles that after years of blogging for myself -- and only a few readers -- I started writing more seriously at InfoBarrel and HubPages in July of 2011. The revenue sharing models are great, and because the sites have more authority than my previous blogs, I know that my content is being read.

In addition to the benefit of having my content appear on more established platforms, it's also great that I've had the chance to earn some passive income from both HubPages and InfoBarrel (<--that's my referral link, join IB for free) since my articles have been published. "Passive" now only because the "active" work is done, and the articles can still earn as long as the web sites stay live. But what seems like a great problem among many revenue-sharing writers is follow-through, or continuity. Counting this one, I have a combined seventy-two (72) articles at the two sites, and I have a goal for a hundred by the end of 2011. I have also created a few niche/blog sites during the same period and have written a combined 55 blog posts of various lengths.

But I have seen many writer's profiles on both IB and HP where they've authored a few good, solid articles are then wander off, lose interest, or just go back into their busy lives. I don't want that to be me. I don't want to lose my drive, my edge... my momentum.

THE ADVICE I'VE BEEN GIVEN

Repeatedly since the summer, the advice I see echoed most among established writers, especially among those who are satisfied with their ever-growing body of works, and are now earning regular Google adsense payouts each month is pretty much the same: 1) keep generating good content, 2) don't give up and, 3) interlink your content, and 4) try to hang in there, and then just repeat 1-3!

We all believe that we have the resolve to hold the line until the returns come our way -- but it's also human nature to completely lose interest in something that's not working. Since I freely admit that earning income online is one of my goals here -- no offense to those who write just for personal reasons -- I needed a different plan. I need a way to incentivize myself to stay with this online content 'experiment' long-term.

ACTIVE vs. PASSIVE: "Instant Gratification vs. Patient Person"

I'm not the most patient person at times, so knowing that some people on InfoBarrel and HubPages who are NOW earning real money each month have been members since way back in 2009 (ha!) really makes me fidgety. And one such successful member posted an income article where he stated that a portion of his articles NEVER MAKE MONEY. (This is some variation of the 80/20 rule, - where 80% of your content does very little besides ranking, interlinking, etc, but that the other 20% earns all the income.) When I realize that 80% of my 72 live articles may not produce anything (about 58 articles), it makes me feel like I'm just starting. (72 - 57 = 15! yikes!)

MY CURRENT 'MOMENTUM' SOLUTION

To keep myself engaged in this whole process, I've been occasionally writing small gigs and content for various clients at Fiverr.com, and for a separate blog site client. Between those two sources, I've been able to earn more than a few hundred dollars for my writing in the same time period, while I wait for my revenue-sharing articles to rank, season, and get traffic. Even though this paid writing is done, sold, and gone forever -- I understand the immediate return and I'm happy with it (so is my super-supportive wife!). I've read about online writers waiting eight to twelve (8-12) months to make their first Google Adsense minimum payout ($100). It's great that these earnings are all based on organic click revenue, but writing for immediate pay will keep me patient while I wait for that first payout. (October I earned $12.88 with Adsense and this month so far its at $9.41. Still no Amazon affiliate sales on either site.)

I've also recently registered at Elance and will soon sign up for oDesk, so I can find even more writing for hire projects. It's a great supplement to my full-time job, it pays bills, or make my annual Roth IRA long-term savings contribution. And it gives me money to reinvest in my "online business" -- just got a hosting account! I have a few niche blog sites now to try to increase my Adsense revenue, and to take advantage of Amazon and other Affiliate programs from Commission Junction. But maybe I'll add more over the winter...

If you're impatient to earn money online while your articles rank and ripen, go do a direct writing gig -- there seem to be plenty of successful internet entrepreneurs that would rather outsource their content then create it themselves. And that outsourcer can be ME... (or you!).

Comments 9 comments

yarddog2k profile image

yarddog2k 5 years ago from Texas, USA

This is good logical advice. I am following the same path and I too have my own self hosted blog site, but getting traffic to it is the real trick. One of the reasons I write at other blog sites is to try and build a readership and gently coax them towards my own website. One good site that I have joined is Suite 101. I get paid upfront for any of my articles that they publish, and those articles continue to earn royalties for years to come. Not every article will be accepted. They have fairly high writing standards and will not accept articles with misspellings and grammatical errors. There is a link to their site in my hub "Legitimate Online Jobs Part Two". Check them out. I think it might be something suited to your writing style.


yarddog2k profile image

yarddog2k 5 years ago from Texas, USA

I made a mistake when I listed Suite 101. I was in the process of writing an article about them and it was still on my mind. I am a member at Suite 101, but have not written anything for them. I meant to tell you about Yahoo Contributor. I have written and submitted 2 articles to them and am waiting to hear if they will be accepted or not. YC is the site that pays upfront for your accepted articles and then so much for every 1000 page views. I'm sorry for the error. I should not start writing replies until I have had at least 3 cups of coffee. lol


CapstoneTrends profile image

CapstoneTrends 5 years ago from Outside Boston, Massachusetts, USA Author

Thanks, I'll check that out!!


Credence2 profile image

Credence2 5 years ago from Florida (Space Coast)

To keep myself engaged in this whole process, I've been occasionally writing small gigs and content for various clients at Fiverr.com, and for a separate blog site client. Between those two sources, I've been able to earn more than a few hundred dollars for my writing in the same time period, while I wait for my revenue-sharing articles to rank, season, and get traffic.

Capstone, I am glad that I ran into you, tell me more. I am trying to up the ante and I have a great deal of time available to do just that. What do you mean by "3" good linking? You have done very well considering the amount of time you have been a member here. I think that I write good stuff and like to get an even broader readership. Can you point the way?

Yarddog2K, I will check your info out as well

Thanks, Cred2


CapstoneTrends profile image

CapstoneTrends 5 years ago from Outside Boston, Massachusetts, USA Author

Yeah thanks for checking this out, Cred2! The advice is basically about continuously building an interconnected WEB of content. If you write an article about "vacations" for example, and six months later you write an article about "cruise ships", then you can go back and make sure that your "vacations" article has a link to the new "cruise ships" article. If both articles point at each other it can defeat the purpose for page ranking possibilities. The real goal is to KEEP readers once you have them! Obviously HubPages has related article "groups" that help send readers to your other content, but it's not inline text and "contextual". You could decide that you want everyone to go to your "cruise ships" article and point all related links of future articles there.

I use InfoBarrel and HubPages to point at each other for that purspose. That's also why you create a niche site. Everything can point back to your own domain... All best!


I_Lurk_ThoseCells profile image

I_Lurk_ThoseCells 5 years ago

I believe that factor of persistence and attitude is receipt for success. Also, courage to fail and live with it, and that try again but improved and better.


Credence2 profile image

Credence2 5 years ago from Florida (Space Coast)

Thanks, Cap, I will stay tuned!


anglnwu profile image

anglnwu 4 years ago

Patience is definitely a necessary virtue in generating passive income. Thanks for your helpful tips.


Reginald Boswell profile image

Reginald Boswell 4 years ago from Alabama

Thanks for sharing.

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