The Mega-Million Lottery Scam

I am sure, since all hubbers are intelligent, few would actually fall for the lottery scam. Most of the time, the award letter arrives from some odd place in awkward English stating your email address was picked randomly from thousands. There was no need for play or buy a ticket. It was computer selected and you have won millions.

Recently, I received a phone call from someone claiming to be on the awards committee for Mega Millions in the US. The person was not a native English speaker, I suspected Africa fairly quickly, but I played along. The connection was very static. The man indicated that my name was randomly selected by the computer out of thousands and this is done a few times a month. I was informed I had won $2.5 million. After all the congrats, the man told me how to claim it. Obviously, they knew my address, although, he totally mispronounced a very simple word, they knew my home phone number, and knew my email. I wondered what else did they know?

In any case, I was to go to Walgreens or somewhere to buy two scratch lottery tickets. I never really understood why, and give the lottery ticket numbers to this official. Their award committee would fly up by helicopter (why, a helicopter?) from Carson near Los Angeles. It would comprise of 4-5 officials to present me a check on Bank America. They would then follow me to my bank to insure security. He guaranteed the check was a true mega million lottery win. However, in order to get the winnings, a payment of $1000 was required to insure security arrangements. I pressed him as to why I had to pay anything if I had really won, he repeated the security blurb.

I told him it sounded like a scam. That is when he had a very well prepared statement as to why it was not a scam. They had covered the most usual questions most would ask and all the answers did make sense, to a degree. As I continued to question him, he got frustrated and finally said, "Please, it is not a scam but you are wasting my time. Do agree with the terms?"

Terms? If I had really won $2.5 million, why would anyone have to pay anything to get it? That is the bottom line with ANY scams, if its a lottery win, one should never have to pay a dime to get the money. Still, I had fun toying with the scammer.

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Comments 8 comments

Curiad profile image

Curiad 4 years ago from Lake Charles, LA.

These scammers are probably the same ones Bill Holland finds in his Google searches for "Stupid Questions!"

Good Hub Perry.


giocatore profile image

giocatore 4 years ago

Ironically, many people probably lose more than $1,000 every year playing legitimate government lotteries.


perrya profile image

perrya 4 years ago Author

For sure!


kschang profile image

kschang 4 years ago from San Francisco, CA, USA

You can always submit your experience to 419eater.com


perrya profile image

perrya 4 years ago Author

what is 419?


kschang profile image

kschang 4 years ago from San Francisco, CA, USA

419 is the Nigerian Criminal Code regarding fraud. As a result, all "Nigerian Scam" are know as 419's. :D


perrya profile image

perrya 4 years ago Author

Oh. A great site to check on a scam is: scam.com


kschang profile image

kschang 4 years ago from San Francisco, CA, USA

Actually 419eater is a scam baiting site: they try to make the scammers do the most stupid things, like paint their faces and dance and submit their pictures to the 'victim' as proof before victim will send money.

I think the most famous case was one guy actually got a carved head (of his own head, sort of)

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