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Who's fault is the Recession?

  1. erickazoso profile image60
    erickazosoposted 7 years ago

    I'm curious what others think, in my opinion, the current recession we're in is simply the fault of the people that wanted a house and either couldn't afford their loans or didn't educate themselves properly on the loan they were getting into.

    1. onthewriteside profile image60
      onthewritesideposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I was going to answer this but it would take a whole Hub to do it correctly and I have to crash right about now.  Suffice it to say that people going out to buy homes that couldn't afford them was a contributing factor, but that in itself was merely an affect of much more disturbing underlying factors that go back decades.  It's not a Republican or a Democratic thing...but rather the "powers that really are"...and that is basically the money guys.  I could expound and prove my point, but I don't have the time right now.

      Try Googling the Bears Sterns bailout and see what you get.  you'll be amazed how many officers of that company are affiliated with the GOV, and what it is doing right now regarding business...

    2. Mark Knowles profile image59
      Mark Knowlesposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Ah - you are obviously unaware of the interesting "investment vehicles," that leveraged these loans.

      You could have paid off every sub-prime mortgage in the country and we still would have crashed and burned. lol

      Wait until the commercial borrowers who wanted an office block and couldn't afford their loans or didn't educate themselves properly have finished defaulting - around about 2012. wink

      1. ledefensetech profile image81
        ledefensetechposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Give it a month or two when the Alt-A loans reset.  There's some thought that all the banks in the US will become insolvent due to this.  That's why some outside the banking industry think the banks are hoarding the TARP money, or doing what Goldman Sachs did: take it from AIG's TARP money that way they can hold it, don't have to pay it back and aren't beholden to Congress. 

        As for who was responsible?  The loose credit policy of the Fed, which started about 1993 is the real culprit.

        1. Eric Graudins profile image61
          Eric Graudinsposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          I'd go back a bit further back than that. 1971, when the requirement to have gold backing for the US currency was removed.

          Also, the "miracle" of fractional reserve banking, where the banks can create $100 of money to lend out of thin air for about every $10 that is deposited with them.

          Nations all over the world are pumping money into the population to stumulate the economy. Is this money being used to fund productive enterprises which will return dividends in future? No - It's being used to give people money to buy consumer goods, and to prop up banks and a crooked financial system that should be allowed to fail.

          And as for the recession being at an end?
          Hold that thought for 12 months, and let me know if that's still what you think.

          I reckon that in the years to come, the hardship that is being experienced now will be fondly remembered as the "Good Old Days".

          1. ledefensetech profile image81
            ledefensetechposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Oh we could go further back than that, to Bretton Woods in 1945 or back to the BoE's decision to go off the gold standard.  It's interesting to read what people thought back then, most people were adrift when the BoE did that, it was like a foundation of their world had just gone away.  We could go back further to the Great War or the establishment of the Fed in 1913.  Heck we could go back to the assignats of the First French Republic for that matter.  This sort of thing has happened time and time again, but, as usual, people don't get the lesson involved.

            1. Eric Graudins profile image61
              Eric Graudinsposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              I couldn't agree more.

              It's as though the financial "kings" are continually reliving their own version of "Groundhog Day", and us poor suckers have  little option but to go along for the ride.

      2. Ron Montgomery profile image61
        Ron Montgomeryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        December of 2012? hmmmmm

        1. dohn121 profile image88
          dohn121posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          smile

        2. manlypoetryman profile image75
          manlypoetrymanposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          how's that for timing!

    3. Misha profile image75
      Mishaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      It's likely to be just a manifestation of natural trends in collective mood, retracing a hundred year long or so uptrend. smile

    4. apeksha profile image60
      apekshaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      software industry as they offerd much more salary so bulk came in the industry..so when recession bad condition....came in picture..as 1000000000000000000 people and 10000 projects...
      ha ha

  2. HubChief profile image68
    HubChiefposted 7 years ago

    Just posted this from one of the popular real estate preachers: I found it informative.

    What’s going on right now in america with so many homes going into foreclosure is due to outrageous loans made to almost anyone who could cause a mirror to fog up. In different parts of the country, many lenders even committed fraud by placing a higher value on homes than they were worth, simply so they could inflate the amount of the loan needed by the homeowner, and boost their own profits.

    The fears over the U.S. subprime mortgage market have triggered a global credit crunch playing havoc with Wall Street stock portfolios, and dragging down global markets.

    In case you’re not familiar with the term, subprime loans are offered at high interest rates, and usually on adjustable terms, to Americans who have a poor credit rating, and might otherwise be denied loans. But as interest rates have risen, so have those adjustable payments, leaving many homeowners stretched beyond their means.

  3. BrianFanslau profile image60
    BrianFanslauposted 7 years ago

    The Penguins

    1. Lisa HW profile image82
      Lisa HWposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      and the Freemasons.   smile

  4. oscillationatend profile image60
    oscillationatendposted 7 years ago

    Well, the banks primarily. But they got help from the Gov'ment. Started passing laws to give everyone a "piece of the American pie," A.K.A. a house.

    The banks were told to sell riskier and riskier loans because everyone deserves a chance at owning land...

    ...and then the banks yanked it out from underneath when the time was right.

    Thanks Goldmann-Sachs, we love you too.

    (I've got your investment instrument right here!)

  5. erickazoso profile image60
    erickazosoposted 7 years ago

    interesting points, anyone else want to throw anything out there?  I'm trying to post a financial blog a couple times a week, throwing a new perspective out there, come by and check it out, leave your opinions too, i am curious what people have to say.

    1. earnestshub profile image87
      earnestshubposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Eric, you may want to get the free Australian online financial paper called "The Daily Reckoning."  It is diverse with many fresh opinions you will not find elsewhere easily.Another one is "Money Morning"

      1. ledefensetech profile image81
        ledefensetechposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        It's not Australian Earnest, it's written by a guy from Baltimore who has his company offices in Paris, France of all places.

  6. lrohner profile image85
    lrohnerposted 7 years ago

    Guys, guys, guys. You are seriously depressing me. I'm still trying to reconcile all of the newscasts that say that the housing market is getting better vs foreclosure rates won't stabilize until mid-2010 or later.

    All I know is that from my eensy, weensy corner of the world, lenders are starting to lend and people are starting to spend. Don't go bringing me down from that high!

    http://www.messengerfreak.com/emoticons/smilies/Hammer3.gif

    1. earnestshub profile image87
      earnestshubposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Well acording to our Government in Australia, we are over it and in the clear! Not a chance in hell, this is just the calm before hyper inflation.

      1. bgamall profile image85
        bgamallposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Ernest, hyperinflation is a possibility but we are not out of a deflation danger yet. There are a lot of deflationary things happening, including high unemployment, lower wages, less hours, lower house prices, more foreclosures, the credit card crisis, the need for banks to write off untradeable assets and the commercial real estate crisis, whew!

        1. earnestshub profile image87
          earnestshubposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          bgmall that was great, I have not put any effort in to the Australian economy for a while, so thanks for the big picture. Like a lot of Australian business people, I watch America as much as I can, because historically, when they trip, we fall all the way down the stairs with them on top of us!

          1. beautyrose profile image61
            beautyroseposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            I think people keeps barking on obama. Haven't you ask former president bush where did he spent the money since he spend a lot much expense on war like in Iraq. Probably some funds in other department have been used up. And hidden mismanagement of credit and debt maybe which resulted to economic crisis which affected most the top state of the pyramid all over the world.

    2. Misha profile image75
      Mishaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      It's called a "dead cat bounce" smile

  7. wrenfrost56 profile image82
    wrenfrost56posted 7 years ago

    For sure the banks, they just whopped me with a £38 bank charge for a missed item payment of £3.25! Even though they didn't pay it and the money was in there the next day and did get paid! They call it unathorised borrowing! Yet they just robbed the tax payers blind and are now giving out £100,000 bonuses again! Sorry this issue really hacks me off!

  8. bgamall profile image85
    bgamallposted 7 years ago

    The Bank of International Settlements and their satellite central banks allowed off balance sheet banking at Basel 2. This shadow hidden banking ended up allowing liar loans and the like. So the Fed, who failed to regulate and the BIS, who allowed the shadow banking, were at fault for the severe recession. Had they just allowed an ordinary recession after the dot com crash we would be at less risk.

  9. erickazoso profile image60
    erickazosoposted 7 years ago

    i appreciate the recommended reading and will look into it.  hope aussies down there are turning around, i'm hoping the market here in the usa is finally heading in the right direction, but i have a feeling we're going to see one more good dip before we're in the clear.

  10. HubChief profile image68
    HubChiefposted 7 years ago

    beauty, the use of word "barking" is little strong for people who are genunely being critiques in constructive sense so that we all can come out of the recession.

    Bush is not president today as people do not like him. Obama is and people have right to ask right questions and provide constructive critisism that would help president obama and his team.

    Hope you understand than being defensive.

    1. beautyrose profile image61
      beautyroseposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      is rallying in front obama's office not offensive? I think it is. I used barking term just point out or emphasize that people expect obama to become a magic worker to restore economic crisis within his few months of term and that is next to impossible lols

  11. HubChief profile image68
    HubChiefposted 7 years ago

    Well, peace rallying is a human right. just to show that there is problem. Could be more in politicians mind but not in mine.

    If you have seen "Milk" (not related at all but just the way that gay leader is shown to prove his point, I am not gay fan at all and think that his point was against human anatomy) However, I would still give him a chance to speak and explain his likings are abnormal than using strong words.

    I understand the context now still why use hard words here? Better provide viewpoint and it is more than welcome. It is ok to cheer his side however not ok to write hard. May offend some others who are asking questions.

    By the way, I think the job done so far is not bad at all. the stock prices and recovering housing markets are metrics of his success in my mind. aren't they? I also invited users to write more in another forum "Obama again" so as to read more mature thoughts.

    1. beautyrose profile image61
      beautyroseposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      why you so onion skin about my word are you not used in politics oh c'mon.

    2. beautyrose profile image61
      beautyroseposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      why you so onion skin about my word are you not used in politics oh c'mon. There are even worse commentary in the people's mouth than a mere barking word. You looks like you were just born yesterday huh

  12. profile image0
    pgrundyposted 7 years ago

    What recession? The front page of the newspaper here said just this week that the jobless recovery has begun. We're all better now. smile

    1. earnestshub profile image87
      earnestshubposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Jeez Pam, and I thought we were unique in Oz. We got exactly the same schmooze yesterday from our Prime Minister! I wonder if anyone bought it?

      1. profile image0
        pgrundyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        It's such crap. I can't stand to watch the news anymore. Lies and damned lies.

        1. earnestshub profile image87
          earnestshubposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Our Australian Pollys don't lie, they statisticize!

  13. earnestshub profile image87
    earnestshubposted 7 years ago

    If we follow the usual pattern it could be twelve years before we recover too!

    1. Eric Graudins profile image61
      Eric Graudinsposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      You're such an incurable optimist Earnest lol

      1. earnestshub profile image87
        earnestshubposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Eric I have to laugh smile otherwise I'd cry! We are in good hands, if American bankers are good hands eh?

  14. world of the wise profile image25
    world of the wiseposted 7 years ago

    In my country, the recession did not hit at all
    Sorry to you guys who were effected. But i think it was your banks

    1. bgamall profile image85
      bgamallposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      It is all about the banks. And there is more pain coming: http://business.theatlantic.com/2009/07 … geance.php

      This link should make Pam Grundy jump for glee. Apparently FASB, who was so late in adding M2M that it did more harm than good, wants derivatives written off that are off the balance sheets but owned by the big banks. Interesting to see which big banks will fail with this.

      BTW FASB could have cleared up the off balance scam that their parent in crime, the Bank of international settlements in Basel, allowed in 1998. They could have implemented M2M in 2004 when the bubble was young. But they let it fester and didn't apply M2M until 2007, when it was too late.

  15. profile image0
    pgrundyposted 7 years ago

    "Nations all over the world are pumping money into the population to stimulate the economy. Is this money being used to fund productive enterprises which will return dividends in future? No - It's being used to give people money to buy consumer goods, and to prop up banks and a crooked financial system that should be allowed to fail."

    Yes, the stock market has come complete unmoored from any kind of reality. It's all just smoke and mirrors at this point.

  16. Eric Graudins profile image61
    Eric Graudinsposted 7 years ago

    When reading financial news (spin), I always sing a line from Jimmy Buffett:

    "If we weren't all crazy, we'd just go insane"

    lol lol Ying Tong Iddle I Po. I'm a teapot, I'm a teapot Whoo! Chuff Chuff cool

  17. Bredavies profile image72
    Bredaviesposted 7 years ago

    I have no clue.

    But I can say no matter how much i dislike Bush (this is just MY opinion)I'm not goin blame him for the down fall of the economy. Someone was obviously pulling the strings.

  18. erickazoso profile image60
    erickazosoposted 7 years ago

    this is a great forum we have going so far, lots of different views and information

 
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