Terra Forming Mars Is A Fortuitous Path!

Chance of rain today in the Olympus Mons region, be sure to bring your umbrella.

Another rewarding catch from the Hubble telescope, thanks NASA!
Another rewarding catch from the Hubble telescope, thanks NASA!

Get along lonesome Martians, get along get along...

There is a hilarious debate going on in the scientific community over whether or not to attempt to terraform Mars in a bid to expand the human territory times two worlds. I say hilarious because the philosophical, some might say ethical constipation derives from once again, the Purists who believe we first must determine whether or not there is life on Mars before we open up an Interplanetary House Of Pancakes on our red neighbor cousin. It's because they believe that to discover life on Mars would prove to the naysayers once and for all, that life exists on other planets besides the Earth.

The problem here is two fold:

A. People who don't believe that life exists on other worlds will never believe it. In the same way that some individuals believe the Earth is still flat and that Neil Armstrong never did the lunar Cha Cha. If you could take these same minuscule minds and somehow transport them across the galaxy to another inhabited planet these skeptics would tell you they are on the set of a Hollywood movie, and that they know Steven Spielberg's hiding around here somewhere!

B. Proof of so called "native" life on Mars is damn near impossible to validate. This is because of our own dirty boots. That is, all the instruments and gadgets that we clever humans send to the dusty red ball carry with them Earth's robust bacteria. They hitch a ride and voila! You got your first metaphorical dandelions on Mars. That doesn't make exploration any less exciting, it's just that we tend to mix it up where ever we go, especially with microscopic organisms. That's why I stay away from kindergarten drinking fountains. Fossils of a giant Chartreuse Flightless Pelican would prove that life existed there anyway, even if it's coloration was embarrassing to Martians.

As you can see, the argument that we should not colonize Mars because we will contaminate it with our own bacteria is expired. There are other reasons people believe we shouldn't bother. The most common is the case for human rights and budget.

These naysayers to Martian colonization are waiting for all us Earthlings to first get along nice, share all our stuff, and stop peeing in the pool. These people want to see absolute peace on Earth before we go pooling our resources into something as foolish as sailing a Spanish armada off the edge of the Earth searching for a quicker passage to India! There is peace on Earth, did you see it? There it goes! Now it's gone. Now it's back! Now it's gone again. Bummer. These individuals need to sit down with a good nine or ten inch thick world history book sometime. Take a gander at the past few thousand years of human endeavor and there certainly is at least one consistency! People constantly abuse, kill and otherwise enslave other people. I'm not saying we should stop fighting it, we should fight the good fight with all we've got. I propose that the human race is at it's best when it has vast amounts of territory to explore, here's why.

Humans were made to hunt and explore. Despite the best intentions of all my vegetarian and vegan friends, those canines they own weren't put there to pierce the hide of a rutabaga. When people can't hunt, or fulfill that most basic carnal urge, collectively they turn and hunt each other. That is one more reason we need more room. To distract us from ourselves.

Another reason, and this is beyond all argument, is that every once in a few thousand or hundreds of thousands of years a great big rock or snowball aka comet philanders it's way into our orbit then collides with Mother Earth like a drunk Uncle on a wedding reception dance floor. We need to hedge our bets. I'm not much of a gambling man but even I know that playing two rounds of Blackjack gives you better odds than just playing one. If we have two habitable planets to live on, we buy the human race more time to learn how to be at peace with itself.

I posit this notion. If Mars was a big, lush green and blue planet full of ripe red fruit and ambling purple koala bear creatures, we'd already been there and back and set up the first Mars Hotel complete with red sky concierge service. I believe the impetus for other civilizations across our galaxy to master colonization and space travel was driven by the ability to see quickly that their neighbor planet was hospitable. Of the millions of habitable planets out in the universe, certainly some of them contain more than one Earth like planet in the same solar system? These civilizations had the best dangling carrot of them all, and probably are the most advanced creatures out there.

We have a handicap in that Mars needs some work. The atmosphere is thin mainly and it's colder than a polar bears rump out there, from around −220 F/−140C to 68F/20C. Most people don't realize how balmy it can get, which with evidence of water, combinedly exposes the reality of real terraforming. If there's one thing we humans have proved so far about ourselves is we know how to crank up the atmosphere! We're pushing our population so fast we could turn the greenhouse effect up high enough Earth will give Venus (ambient surface temperature average 860F/460C) a run for it's money.

How we do it is a whole different subject that I will address in a future article. But suffice it to say, it's going to take some genius and grit like that of the Wright Brothers building their Kitty Hawk. Many of my Native American Indian kin agree that we didn't arrive here from some lousy land bridge as postulated by European dominated science. We came here from the Sky People. I believe we as human beings have a longer history than we can barely begin to fathom. I believe our future is inherently tied to our past. I believe to gain a future worth living, we have to take the risks our forefathers took when they reached out and grabbed the shore of an unknown wilderness then climbed bravely onto the new land.


Give me a home, where the Martian Buffalo roam...

The most shining attribute of the human race is our ability to explore and adapt. Mars is the next frontier...
The most shining attribute of the human race is our ability to explore and adapt. Mars is the next frontier...

Give Mars A Chance!

Do you believe it's a good idea to vigorously pursue the terraforming and colonization of Mars?

  • Yes, absolutely! To the best of our abilities, with the collected efforts of all Earth's nations and peoples.
  • No way! We need to shoe all the children, even the ones who don't like shoes. We need to get everyone to stop waging war first.
  • Maybe, but first I want jet packs and hovercrafts to become available to the public here on Earth.
  • Maybe, will there be cake on Mars? If there'll be cake than yes, we should.
See results without voting

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Comments 12 comments

stars439 profile image

stars439 6 years ago from Louisiana, The Magnolia and Pelican State.

i like mars.


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 6 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA Author

Me too, I hope I get to see the first outpost there before I die!

Thanks for the comment stars439!


Anna Irvine profile image

Anna Irvine 6 years ago

We are starchildren...


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 6 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA Author

Indeed we are Anna, indeed we are.


Green Lotus profile image

Green Lotus 6 years ago from Atlanta, GA

Personally I'm sad that NASA's space program hasn't done anything terribly mind-blowing since the moon walk. As you said, we're too busy blowing up our own planet.


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 6 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA Author

I agree about the moon-walk. I don't get too down on NASA because I feel like their goals are a combination of Federal leadership (or lack thereof) and governing by public opinion and fear. I believe that it's going to take a joint effort from the public and private sectors to make a Mars chance happen, and mostly, it's going to take a supportive public that isn't afraid of casualties. Like you said H: , there's a willingness of "blowing up our own planet" and destroying people by the hundreds of thousands, but we've only lost a handful of space explorers and that is often cited as a reason we should wait to explore.

Thanks for stopping by!


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 6 years ago from North America

Very entertaining and spacified. :) Thumbs up!


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 6 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA Author

Thanks Patty! It was an honor to be recognized by successful writers (& Grandmasters of Ji Do Kwan!!!) such as yourself and SzuzyB! I am an advocate of Mars exploration and how!

Honored that you stopped by for a look, thank you!


Niteriter profile image

Niteriter 6 years ago from Canada

The ads that showed up here when I visited were hilarious. They were all for wedding receptions and hotels! I think we should give up on scrounging for Adsense coins and go stake out some property on Mars.

I'll print the little triangular flags and you string up your bow and arrow. The next clear night, we'll send up our markers. Ten years from now, buddy, our worries will be over!


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 6 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA Author

I know what you mean about the ads, when you get all things Mars you really get all things Mars!

Here here on staking our claim on Mars! I'm ready when you are, I think all we need is some extra warm long underwear and a greenhouse to be able to grow hops and barley.

Thanks for stopping by Niteriter!


Dolores Monet profile image

Dolores Monet 5 years ago from East Coast, United States

Hi, Ben - I wonder if you have read Kim Stanley Robinson's trilogy - Red Mars, Blue Mars, and Green Mars, about the colonization and terraforming of Mars. It brings up the geological stuff, politics, and all kinds of stuff to think about.


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 4 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA Author

I remember hearing about that trilogy years ago thanks for the reminder Dolores, that might be just the winter diversion I could use soon! I'll check it out.

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