Apple Blossoms, Silly Sayings and The Small Print

Apple Blossoms

It's apple blossom time, and I've been out on the grass, at the front of my house today, snapping the apple blossom trees with my £20 Tesco camera. I hope you like the pictures.

They blossom every year about this time. Trees obviously know the routine, without having to think about it. They don't need brains for what they do. I suppose that’s why they don’t need to go to school either. (I tried that excuse; it didn't work.)

Cherry Blossoms

It's wonderful how these blossoms can lift the spirits. I've lived here with these trees since they were saplings. They signal the end of winter to me, and I feel lucky to be alive - because none of them has fallen on my head yet.

Is This A Dandelion Tree?

Silly Sayings

These apple blossoms always remind me of the saying: ‘money doesn’t grow on trees’. Isn't that a silly saying? Everybody knows that if money grew on trees, the kind of people who grab all the money, would grab all the trees too. I believe that trees are far too important for us to let that happen. 

So, I suppose it’s not so much, how we source money, but how well we use it, that matters. I think money would work better for us if we could keep it out of the tax havens. Then we could use it for useful things like health, pensions and young peoples' education - rather than Learjets.

Mind you, I don't know why I'm blaming the saying for being silly, when it's ‘we, the people’, who say the saying. That's a bit like the saying, 'a bad workman blames his tools' - although it's not quite the same, because if a workman can't afford a new set of tools these days, it could be just that he can't get a bank loan.

However, there's no point in blaming the banks or corporations either, because you can't program empathy into a computer - especially if you don't want to.

Nor can we hold ‘small government’ responsible for the big changes they make, because being small is only convenient when you don’t have to accept responsibility for what you’ve done. 

So, these things are the responsibility of a ‘debt incumbent home-owning’ electorate, ‘who don’t go on strike’ - because repossessions are becoming more abundant than jobs.

Paul Foot - The Vote: How it Was Won and How it Was Undermined

Cherry Blossoms

Apple Blossoms

Albert Einstein

"The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results."
"The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." | Source

Always Read The Small Print

I say that it’s the people who say the saying who are silly, and not the saying itself.

"Never mind all that", (as my wife keeps saying) when we say 'money doesn't grow on trees', are we implying that things that do grow on trees have less value than money? That's what it seems to imply to me. Yet, would that not depend on what we value most? I'm no economist, but when I'm hungry, I'd rather chew on an apple than a credit card. If we have a nuclear holocaust, there'll be plenty of unused credit cards to chew on, and possibly some time to chew over what we've done, but there won’t be much nutrition around - for a few centuries.

Anyway, back to the apple blossom trees. They've been outside my window for thirty-five years now, and I've never had an apple off any of them yet. So if apples don't grow on apple blossom trees, we shouldn't be surprised that money doesn't grow on trees either. That would be a bit like voting New Labour, and expecting to get a Labour Government. If we do it once, it's their fault. If we do it again, and again, we ought to take responsibility for our own actions - especially with government being so small these days.

That chap, who needed a haircut, long before the Rolling Stones were born, put it well, when he said, "The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting apple blossom trees to produce apples.”

Why didn't he think of that, before he thought of the formula for the atom bomb? I bet it didn't stop him from thinking up more formulae. However, we shouldn’t blame formulae for the things that people do with them. That would be like saying a saying's silly, when it’s the silly people who say it, who are silly.

It's no use nagging either, because that's almost the same thing as doing the same thing over and over again - unless you nag only once, which wouldn't really be nagging - unless you keep nagging incessantly. Then I suppose, by definition, that would pass as a single nag, but you still wouldn't get any apples, because they're not apple trees, they're only apple BLOSSOM trees. (It’s in the small print.)

A Poem
Always read the small print,
And make good sense of it,
If everybody read it,
They’d soon stop printing it.

Ah but they're so clever,
They'd find another way,
To take back what they never
Promised anyway.

So always read the small print,
An' digest all the guff,
If you believe your life ain’t,
Sad and short enough.
©amillar 2011

Yes, and as for the small print, the Bank of Scotland keeps trying to get me to put my money into one of these accounts that you can’t get it all out of, in the same day. They say, that that's how money grows, but what they won’t tell me, is how long it would take their Chief Executive to get it out, and put it into a tax haven. They might get it out quicker than me, especially if they know exactly when they’re going to burst the next bubble and use my savings for bonuses (that’s in the small print too).

On the other hand, they can't get it out if I don't put it in. Mind you, a burglar might get it! Well, I suppose it’s my responsibility to be mindful of that - especially when they're sacking the all these police officers, and saying it’s because New Labour spent all our money on hospitals that we’ll never own, but we’ll continue to pay for - ad nauseum - whether we can afford to be nauseous or not. So, if there aren’t any police officers, I suppose I’ll just have to put it into the bank after all. Either way it’ll end up in a tax haven, but I mightn’t get a lump on my head, which isn’t my nose.

Well anyway, if apples don't grow on apple blossom trees, I'm a bit sceptical. They might just be saying something silly, for which they know they won't have to take any responsibility.

I don't suppose they think we're all stupid - do you? It's one thing to take back everything you never really promised anyone, but it's another thing (although similar) to imply, that we're all stupid.

©amillar 2011

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Comments 16 comments

Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 5 years ago from The Beautiful South

Sure agree on not letting someone tell me what I should do with my money when it means turning it over to them. They want to help us sooooo bad. lol Most people believe too.


Fay Paxton 5 years ago

Amillar, you are one of a kind. Thank you for being so wonderfully refreshing.

up/useful and funny


amillar profile image

amillar 5 years ago from Scotland, UK Author

Jackie I don't know exactly why they want my money in that sort of account, but I know that if that's what they want, I want the opposite. I have Celtic blood in me, as one of your US Senators once said, "It's like herding cats" - (Senator Mitchell - talking about Ulster).

Thanks for commenting. I hope the apple blossoms are blooming in your part of the World.


amillar profile image

amillar 5 years ago from Scotland, UK Author

As you'll have noticed Fay, I'm one of the contrary kind, which often infuriated my Mum, but I could never convince her that it was her fault for bringing me into the World. (Although, I knew she could hardly take me back and ask for her money back.)

Anyway, thanks for dropping by and commenting, and for voting me up and funny.


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida

Enjoyed this hub, amillar, especially your clever short poem about the 'small print.' Well done, my friend.

And the apple blossom poems are lovely - really a nice touch.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 5 years ago from The Beautiful South

That was another song Mom sang and yes we have all the blossoms and many come and gone, have to keep that camera ready.


amillar profile image

amillar 5 years ago from Scotland, UK Author

Hiya drbj, I'm glad you enjoyed the hub and poem. The older I get the more I look forward to these apple blossoms returning. We had a particularly bad winter at the end of last year - now we've just had a beautiful spring, so everything's rosy/apple blossomy.

Cheers, my friend.


amillar profile image

amillar 5 years ago from Scotland, UK Author

I love that old song too Jackie. The harmony is beautiful. When I hear that, I can imagine the drone of a Lancaster bomber in the background, and all these young men and women looking forward to peace returning and going home to produce us Baby Boomers. (Maybe not such a happy ending after all.)


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 5 years ago from The Beautiful South

How do you pronounce Celtic? We have the Boston Celtics and it sounds like Seltics, he have Celtic singers who I love and it sounds Celtic like Keltic? Just wondered, figuring you would know.


amillar profile image

amillar 5 years ago from Scotland, UK Author

You can pronounce it both ways Jackie, but if you're talking about a football team you would pronounce it with the s sound; if you're referring to the ancient Celtic people from whom the name came, you would tend to harden the c to the k sound. They're probably folk singers; are they?


Amanda Severn profile image

Amanda Severn 5 years ago from UK

It's good to see the blossom back on the trees, even if fruit doesn't follow. I'm always reminded of the Robert Browning poem;

'And after April, when May follows,

And the whitethroat builds, and all the swallows

Hark! where my blossomed pear-tree in the hedge

Leans to the field and scatters on the clover

Blossoms and dewdrops - at the bent spray's edge

That's the wise thrush; he sings each song twice over,

Lest you should think he never could recapture

The first fine careless rapture!'

I'm guessing that small print dates back to a time when paper was expensive, but now it seems to be there specifically to deter closer inspection. I never know which is worse, small print or legal gobbledygook!


amillar profile image

amillar 5 years ago from Scotland, UK Author

Hi Amanda - Yes, these apple blossoms really give me a lift. They're probably a fortnight to month behind yours in the South. It's not surprising that the poets wax lyrical at this time of year in particular.

It's hard to choose which the worst between gobbledygook and small print is; both have similar functions, I suspect. Governments come and governments go, but Sir Humphrey rules OK . (He doesn’t worry about saving paper.)


prasetio30 profile image

prasetio30 5 years ago from malang-indonesia

I love this hub and I really enjoy all beautiful pictures above. Very well written and thanks for share with us.

Prasetio


amillar profile image

amillar 5 years ago from Scotland, UK Author

Hiya Prasetio - I'm glad you liked the hub and the photos.

Thank you for visiting, and for your kind and encouraging comment.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 5 years ago from The Beautiful South

No, not folk I wouldn't say at all, I will have to ask my husband, he knows everything. I think it is Celtic on my True Love of Mine hub. I don't remember coming here and I listened to those women sing that beautiful song but I have to tell you Mom had them beat, that was one of her best. I cannot think of anything more beautiful than cherry blossoms, falling and on the ground. I have thought so since the first time I saw them in masses at about age 10 at my Aunt's house in North Carolina and then where we lived in my teens we had so many cherry trees and that memory will stay with me forever I hope of the beauty of that every spring. It never lasted long enough.


amillar profile image

amillar 5 years ago from Scotland, UK Author

Yes, it is a lovely song Jackie - about a lovely time of the year - we've had little else but rain since. We had a good spring this year.

These blossoms lift the spirits after a long hard winter, but as you say, they don't linger long; after two or three weeks, the petals carpet the ground. Anyway, as least we then know that we have the summer to look forward to.

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