Caylee Anthony: a murdered child deserves better than bread and circuses

Over two years since her untimely death her face has become imprinted on our social consciousness: the wide blue-green eyes and angel's face that took a pixie-like quality when she smiled. Most Americans have come to love this little child who was snatched in the most unthinkable of ways and during that most precious stage of life, when all should be most wondrous, most beautiful, most carefree. For most of us little Caylee Anthony has come to represent all victims of the most heinous of crimes, child murder.

And so we keep up with the trial of the woman accused of her murder. We keep up with the hope that the facts surrounding Caylee's murder, as much as experts can humanly provide, will be definitively revealed. We keep up with the hope to understand the incredible behavior of a mother, who only days after Caylee went missing, was out partying But most of all we hope for justice for Caylee. For in justice for one child is there hope for justice for all the Caylee Anthony's of this world.

There is a certain amount of drama to be expected in any murder trial case, In trials where details of the crime are highly profiled in the news most of us are likely to form an opinion to the question of guilt or innocence surrounding the accused. This is human and it is understandable. In the matter of the accused in this case -Casey Anthony- I certainly have formed some of my own opinions. There are many, many disturbing issues surrounding Caylee's death and I pray for justice as served according the judicial system of this country.

With this said, however, there is a new and blatantly ugly menace that is emerging in the public interest of this trial. It is a menace that, by right, should be disavowed by the same kind of person who is shocked by reports of any mother out partying while her child was missing. It is, however, an ancient menace, one witnessed many times over the centuries. This menace emerged fully and was nurtured to its full capacity in ancient Rome, where, for the sheer sensational enjoyment of the spectacle, people paid for the privilege to watch starved animals rip each other apart and so-called enemies of Rome crucified. It appeared again in Spain during the days of the Inquisition when the true believers gathered to watch the mutilation and killing of Jews, Moors and other non-Christians. It was allowed to roam unhindered in Europe when crowds thronged into city squares to watch the torture and executions of accused witches. Today it is still welcomed in certain areas of the world, in places where excited mobs gather to witness the stoning of alleged adulterers and where exuberant congregations burn children accused of being possessed by the devil. Wherever humans have allowed their sense of moral indignation to run rampant it has whetted the appetite for revenge in its nurturers and glutted itself on the dessert of suffering. This menace has been called many names over the centuries, but we may know it best today by the name mob mentality.

Yes, it is human to demand justice. The people who vie for tickets and seats in Casey Anthony's trial probably justify their actions by believing they do so in the spirit of seeing justice performed. But this is not a Justin Bieber concert, this is not a line to a ride at Disney World. In grieving for little Caylee the decent do not grin while running for a spot in line at the courthouse. In supporting justice the decent do not squabble and argue over tickets. The decent do not relish every crocodile tear we speculate runs down the face of the woman on trial. The decent weeps for the victim while showing respect for the life lost and without indulging hysteria. To demand bread and circuses was the way of the ancient Romans who took holidays to watch people -including children- crucified. It is not the way of people who treasure the innocence of childhood. By demanding our modern equivalent of bread and circuses we demean the seriousness of the crime against Caylee Anthony. She deserves better than this, and so do all murdered children.

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Comments 9 comments

Lenore Robinson profile image

Lenore Robinson 5 years ago from Delaware

Well said, as usual, bethperry. Indeed, the sight of people lined up outside the courthouse is analogous to that of a rock concert. To see those people physically run to get a seat inside the courthouse, for me, was sickening. The courts should prohibit admission of persons to any murder trial whose sole purpose is personal entertainment. The presence of these idle observers is of no value to all involved. To have the time to satiate their macabre interests suggests their limited societal value as well.


Stu From VT 5 years ago

Incredible. You'd think these moonbats were trying to get to a scalper to buy the last ticket to the super bowl.


kittythedreamer profile image

kittythedreamer 5 years ago from the Ether

very true, beth! i have been following the casey anthony case, as it is very close to my hometown. so sad...it makes me sick how this little girl's death has become such a spectacle to the public.


Lenore Robinson profile image

Lenore Robinson 5 years ago from Delaware

Have you seen the latest with these parasitic voyeurs? Why is this allowed? Does the judge have the authority to close the court? If so, and he chooses not to, I would be forced to question his motive.


bethperry profile image

bethperry 5 years ago from Tennesee Author

kitty, oh how awful that must be. And I agree; this is a serious case and a child was killed. There is no excuse for such feral behavior on the part of these people.


bethperry profile image

bethperry 5 years ago from Tennesee Author

Lenore, I saw some news about it yesterday. I don't know, but you'd think the judge has the power to close the court from public spectators. And I wish he would.


quester.ltd profile image

quester.ltd 5 years ago

well written and thought out Hub - could not agree with the idea more - but over reaction of the political world is beyond words - shame on them and on us for putting up with them

q


bethperry profile image

bethperry 5 years ago from Tennesee Author

Well said, quester.itd, and thanks for dropping by to read!


Nicole S profile image

Nicole S 4 years ago from Minnesota

I followed this case as well, but I suppose there's only one person who knows the whole truth. Either way it was a very sad story.

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