In Praise of Democracy - Analysis of the Value of Democratic Government in the World Today

Yours Truly
Yours Truly

An Introduction to the Story of Democratic Government

Which is the greatest word in the English language? 'Love'? 'Peace'? 'God'? Everyone will have their own opinion but I would make a case for 'Democracy'.

If it is the greatest word in the English language, 'democracy' is certainly not English in origin. Democracy derives from the Greek 'demos' (people) and 'kratos' (power), and was coined in the 4th or 5th centuries BC to describe those city states such as Athens in which citizens (common men, but not women or slaves) could have a free say without censorship in the conduct of the state's affairs.

After this promising start, democracy did not have an easy time of it. The baser instincts of mankind - ambition, jealousy, mistrust, and above all the love of power - meant that it seemed not to be in the interests of leaders to submit to the will of the people. It was a long time before democracy took off, but the past 60 years has seen a flourishing of this principle of freedom which has been quite remarkable.

In this page I attempt a brief overview of the key principles of democracy, the advantages (and disadvantages), and the current state of democracy in the world today. It is by no means an authoritative view, as it is just one ordinary person's individual opinion to be agreed with or rejected. But I am exercising my right to express that opinion - that, after all, is what the concept of democracy is all about.

Contents

  • An introduction to the story of democratic government
  • Why write this page?
  • What is democracy?
  • Democracy is not a political system
  • The two fundamental principles of democracy
  • Democracy - the most basic of human rights
  • The right to dictate?
  • The right to vote / the right not to vote
  • The disadvantages of democracy
  • The advantages of democracy
  • The mechanisms of democratic election
  • To fight for king and country, or democracy?
  • Western policy towards democracy
  • Complacency in democracies and respect for other peoples rights to democratic government
  • Any country can embrace democracy
  • Differentiating between failings of democracy and failings of leaders
  • Accuracy of statistics - a note of caution
  • History of democratic change - prior to the 20th century
  • History of democratic change in the 20th century
  • The ever-rising tide of democratic change in the 21st century?
  • At the time of writing...
  • Conclusion
  • Links you may like to read

Why Write This Page?

In this piece there are few statistics, but many generalisations, and to be honest, they are generalisations which to some will seem to be common sense, self-evident and unnecessary. So is there any point in writing this page? Sadly, and to my mind quite astonishingly, so many people seem not to understand or appreciate the principle of democracy for what it is.

In the developing world, it has long been a difficult problem for people living under dictatorial regimes to appreciate all the liberties and civil rights which people in democracies enjoy, or to understand the restrictions on excesses of authority under which democratic leaders operate. (I well remember the mystification of some who live under oppressive regimes that a powerful president such as Richard Nixon could be removed from office peacefully - that he could not simply dismiss the courts and clamp down on the free press during the time of the Watergate scandal).

It is much more surprising how many people who have lived all their lives in democracies so often trivialise the merits of these liberties, bracketing together democratic moralities with those of totalitarian states as if they are equally demanding of respect. It is surprising how many would rather utter words of condemnation against a democratic nation such as America or Britain for its actions, than against a dictatorship, for its actions. Startlingly according to one poll, one in seven French people do not believe that democracy is any better than other forms of government [1]. It seems that many who live under democracy fail to appreciate the fundamental virtues and benefits of the freedoms they enjoy - freedoms which others are willing to die for, and for which many are dying today in totalitarian states.

These are the reasons I would like to state the seemingly obvious - everyone should understand what democracy is really all about, and support it.

Athenian democracy was limited, but gave some freedom of expression to ordinary citizens - unheard of in most ancient societies
Athenian democracy was limited, but gave some freedom of expression to ordinary citizens - unheard of in most ancient societies | Source

What is Democracy?

To explain 'what is democracy?' is not quite as easy as it may seem to be. Does it involve everybody having a direct say in all political actions, or does it involve citizens electing an administration. And should any such administration then be charged to carry out in entirety the consensus of the peoples' wishes on all issues, or should it be granted autonomy to act upon its own initiative, to employ all the expertise at its disposal to govern in the best way it sees fit? Every political thinker has their own views and uses their own particular slant on the definition to condemn or to eulogise the administration which interests them.

Some have suggested that in a pure democracy, all adult citizens should have an equal say in the decision making process on every issue of consequence; by such a definition, there would never be any need for a Government to exercise its own judgement, as every citizen would vote in a referendum on every issue. In practice, how this may be achievable, is difficult to imagine. In such a society there would be no sense of direction, no expertise, no deep knowledge to harness, and no cohesion of policy making. What's more, every decision would be subject to interminable delays as referendum after referendum is called.

In practice, therefore, for democracy to work, delegation of decision making on the majority of matters has to be transferred to an appointed or elected body - and as long as this process is conducted openly as the result of a popular vote, then the resultant legislative body or Government still has democratic legitimacy.

If precise definitions are debatable, we are on more certain ground when we consider what qualities a democracy should embrace. It should embrace reasonable freedom to express one's views without fear of recrimination, equality under the law, and above all freedom to have a say, directly or indirectly, in the governance of the country, and the reasonable right of any individual to seek a role in government.

Sadly, the term 'democracy' has been more abused than almost any other. So many nations' leaders have employed the word 'democratic' in their titles, in an attempt to bestow self-respect upon their illiberal regimes, and yet in reality they have been anything but - the former German Democratic Republic (East Germany) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) being obvious examples.

In the following three sections 'Democracy is not a Political System', 'The Two Fundamental Principles of Democracy' and 'Democracy - the most Basic of Human Rights' I seek to explore further what sets democracy apart from all other political concepts, what is most fundamentally distinctive about any democratic process, and why democracy is the most important of all human rights. These three sections should also make clear why such regimes as the 'Democratic' People's Republic of Korea have nothing whatsoever to do with democracy.

Democracy is Not a Political System

It is a common mistake to bracket democracy together with capitalism and socialism, liberalism, communism and fascism, theocracy, and dictatorship, as just one of many kinds of political system. It is not. All of these other concepts are political systems - ways of managing the economy or society to reward the industrious, or to help the weak, to favour a religious belief, or just to preserve the lifestyle of the person in charge. Democracy is not a political system - it is a fundamental human right to express an opinion and have a say in one's future. It is a social freedom whereby in theory at least, almost any of these other political systems can exist and flourish. Under sound democratic principles it should be possible to vote into power capitalists or socialists, liberals, republicans, or even Islamic fundamentalists, if that is what the people of the nation want, and if the government so elected is prepared to respect the principles of democracy outlined below.

This, I think is the single most important message of this article. Democracy is a social freedom and a human right; it is not a political system.

1929. The depression of the late 1920s hit a Germany ravaged by world war and 1920s hyperinflation very hard - a situation which encouraged the rise of Nazi fascism. Here poverty stricken Germans scavange for coal
1929. The depression of the late 1920s hit a Germany ravaged by world war and 1920s hyperinflation very hard - a situation which encouraged the rise of Nazi fascism. Here poverty stricken Germans scavange for coal | Source

The Two Fundamental Principles of Democracy

1) The Right of the People to Elect a Government of Their Choice

One statement I made in the previous section 'Democracy is not a Political System' requires some qualification. I wrote that democracy 'is a social freedom whereby in theory almost any other political systems can exist and flourish'. Certainly it is a truism (in my opinion) that in a democracy, the people should be free to elect almost any government of whatever political complexion they wish, including the most extreme groupings or individuals. That is the peoples' right, and it is the reason for a free ballot. This is what I would call the First Fundamental Principle of Democracy.

2) The Right of the People to Change Their Minds

But the people must also be free to change their minds and remove that government, and - even more importantly - the next generation must be free to make their own decisions, voice a different view, and take the country in a different direction. That's why in a democracy the leadership must submit to another popular vote every 4, 5 or 10 years (within reason the period is academic and shorter or longer terms each have their merits - the important point here is that the life of the government is limited). This is what I would call the Second Fundamental Principle of Democracy.

This second principle of democracy is the reason why I believe that whilst it may be acceptable for extremist, even reprehensible, groups, to stand in an election and attract votes if they can, the one thing the people should NOT be allowed to vote for, is the demise of democracy itself. Any party or individual standing in an election should be obliged under the constitution of the country to submit for re-election after a set number of years, and the basics of this should not be alterable.

(In Germany in 1933, Adolf Hitler and the Nazis actually gained power in a fairly legitimate democratic election. Although there were undoubted flaws and some intimidation in the election, there was, it seems, some popular support for the 'strong government' Hitler offered at a time of great national crisis, and thus the First Principle of Democracy was upheld with some reservation. However Hitler's party, under the pretext of a State of Emergency, then discarded the Second Principle of Democracy, by making political opposition illegal and abandoning the electoral process. At that point the Nazis lost any moral legitimacy to govern).

Basic Freedoms and Rights 2005 - (Freedom House)

Freedom House Map showing basic freedoms and civil rights in the world in 2005.Green is freest, and red is least free. The freest countries are all democracies. *See note about Freedom House and accuracy of statistics later in the article*
Freedom House Map showing basic freedoms and civil rights in the world in 2005.Green is freest, and red is least free. The freest countries are all democracies. *See note about Freedom House and accuracy of statistics later in the article* | Source
A Nuremburg rally in 1934. In a tortured nation, Adolf Hitler at one time undoubtably had popular support from people who did not think too deeply about the meaning and consequences which lay behind the rhetoric
A Nuremburg rally in 1934. In a tortured nation, Adolf Hitler at one time undoubtably had popular support from people who did not think too deeply about the meaning and consequences which lay behind the rhetoric | Source

Democracy - the Most Basic of Human Rights

Human rights are the most basic of rights and freedoms to which we should all be entitled. A charter of such rights was originally formulated and agreed by the united Nations in 1948 as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights [2]. The charter lays out thirty clauses or articles of rights, and I suggest that it is well worth reading. Most of the thirty clauses are worthy aspirations, and all are more likely to be respected in a democracy than in any authoritarian regime. However some of them, I would suggest, are perhaps more fundamental and achievable than others. The term 'human right' is liberally bandied around these days, and diminished as a consequence, because many concepts which activists would wish to promote as basic human rights are - however laudable - nothing of the sort. They are better described as aspirations, which cannot always be guaranteed. For example:

  • The right to life (article 3) is not a right, because it is not always in the hands of mere mortals to guarantee this. Flooding, earthquakes, incurable disease, even accidents, may see to that. And sometimes it may prove necessary for society to take human life in time of war or to counteract lethal violence by anti-social individuals. Even in peacetime, the value of life or indeed even the meaning of life is a subject for legitimate reasoned debate on issues such as abortion or euthanasia on which two people can hold different, yet respectable, points of view. One's view will be based upon the values placed upon such elements as religious belief, scientific evidence, social practicalities and human compassion, and will often be strongly and passionately held, but I think more than one view is legitimate among decent thinking people.
  • The right to a job and an adequate standard of living (articles 23-25) are not fundamental human rights. If there isn't the money or demand then there isn't a job to go to. It's as simple as that. A third world country which is stricken with devastating natural disaster, can scarcely be accused of denying its people their basic human rights, if it cannot afford to create jobs and pay citizens to take those jobs. Full employment and an adequate standard of living are merely laudible objectives which all societies should prioritise and strive to achieve.
  • The right to free education (article 26) or a free health service. There is a very basic morality which suggests any humane, caring society must safeguard the educational interests of its children, and offer care for those who are sick. Therefore no civilised government should neglect its responsibilities in these areas. However whether all education and health care need to be free or whether they should only be free for the least fortunate in society is something for the government - with a democratic mandate - to decide. Some believe that such vital services as these should be freely available to all - rich and poor - in a fair society. Others believe that capitalism and payment for such services drives competition and improvement in standards, which is ultimately of benefit to all. You can argue the case for either point of view, but the point is that there is a case to be argued, and there is no fundamental human rights issue.

Some of these concepts are therefore best described as social or cultural aspirations and economic goals which any government should strive for - not quite the same thing as fundamental human rights. There are indeed very few things which are 'human rights' in the sense that any Government under any circumstances, should necessarily be obliged to provide them, but democracy - the right to participate in the election of the people who govern - is one right which should be guaranteeable by all reasonably stable nations.

I would mention at this stage two subsidiary and genuine human rights which serve to protect democracy. These are the right of free speech, and the right to a free and independent law enforcement body and judiciary.

  • Without the right of free speech, it is almost impossible to ensure that ordinary citizens have the ability to make informed decisions when they vote.
  • Without the right to a free and independent law enforcement body and judiciary, it is almost impossible to ensure citizens will be free from persecution when voting.

Finally, it is one thing to have rights to free speech and justice written down on paper; it is quite another to ensure that these rights can be made truly available to all. Press monopolies, Government run media and extortionate legal fees, may ensure that although equality for all is to be desired, money or power may still talk loudest. This is a major concern in democracies, and all people - citizens and politicians - need to safeguard the principals behind these rights. Failure to safeguard these principles is perhaps the biggest concern to be aired by citizens of democracies.

Basic Freedoms and Rights 2003 - (Polity IV)

'Polity IV' political science data for nations with populations above 500,000 in 2003. The lighter the colour, the freer the nation, the darker the colour red - the less free the political process. As with the Freedom House map, democracies fare best
'Polity IV' political science data for nations with populations above 500,000 in 2003. The lighter the colour, the freer the nation, the darker the colour red - the less free the political process. As with the Freedom House map, democracies fare best | Source

The Right to Vote / the Right Not to Vote

In some countries the belief in the need to strengthen a democratic mandate has led to a requirement in law to vote; it is against the law not to vote. I cannot personally agree with that, even though the intention may be good. I believe an individual should have the freedom not to vote just as much as they should have the right to vote. To be obliged to vote if one has no clear viewpoint is a wasted vote anyway, as such a forced vote is not really supportive of the party or person who receives it.

The Right to Dictate ?

'All power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely'

There is a clear truism about the above statement. Whichever rights are human rights, I would say the right to dictate is most certainly not one of them. And yet undoubtedly there is an appeal for anybody in a position of power to take actions, and to issue decrees, without the tiresome bother of having to answer to other people. Such behaviour will often be carried out for entirely selfish reasons (to line one's pockets and nurture one's ego), though in some cases the reasons may initially be quite well-intentioned; for example, if one believes one's policies are for the good of the country or the people, then the thinking may be that anyone questioning or opposing those policies can only be a hindrance to effective governance).

However what gives someone the right to lay down laws telling other people - grown adult people - how to run their lives, without their consent? In too many countries some individual or some group, be it a political organisation, a religious faith, or the military, still believe they have a right to tell other people what to do.

One party states : Political parties will sometimes have the audacity to believe that they represent the majority or all of the people, so why in their mindset should other groups or parties be allowed a voice? If your party can represent all the people, then any other party with a different point of view must be against the people. It is an arrogant point of view, but it is the point of view of the old Communist one party states, now thankfully largely discredited and reformed. One party states - usually communist or socialist - still exist in China, North Korea, Cuba and several other countries. (Though in some, such as North Korea, monarchy-like dynastic influences may be even more important than party ideals).

Fundamentalist theocracies : These believe they are on even surer ground. They believe they represent not merely the people, but the Word of God, and the Word of God takes precedence over anything mere mortals want. So if they are doing God's work, why on Earth should they accept a contrary human view? Again, it is utter arrogance in their own self-righteousness which prevents them from acknowledging any alternative philosophy. Despite Western paranoia very few such states exist. Since the overthrow of the Taliban in Afghanistan, Iran is perhaps the closest to a theocracy today, as an elected president is answerable to a theocratic council.

Absolute monarchies : An absolute Monarch is in a similar position, as he believes he has a divine right to rule over everyone else. He has Royal Blood, and his rule is decreed by God. Again, what arrogance (which ignores that most have acquired their positions as a result of their ancestors employing force of might in battle to found the dynasty). Absolute monarchies are thankfully rapidly becoming a thing of the past, but a few still exist. Saudi Arabia remains essentially an absolute monarchy.

Absolute dictatorships : An absolute dictator is something different. The phrase 'absolute power corrupts absolutely' can certainly be applied to such people. There's something in all of us which likes the idea of being able to do what we like, simply because we can. If we have that power, then we no longer have to worry about other people's concerns, because they can't stop us. An absolute dictator is freed from the constraints of social conformity, because they have put themselves above society. They can indulge their natural greed for power or aggrandisement. It is difficult to quantify the number of absolute dictatorships today, because many exist under the guise of party systems with seemingly independent parliamentary and legal systems. However the leader in these countries remains unaccountable to either parliament or the law, which can be changed at the leader's whim. The most infamous examples of dictators in the past century include the Fascist leaders of Europe, notably Hitler, whilst Africa has produced the likes of Idi Amin and Emperor Bokassa. More recently we have seen the demise of Saddam Hussein of Iraq and Colonel Gaddafi of Libya.

Military dictatorships : A military dictatorship is one in which a General or Colonel believes that law and order justifies the army taking control. The end - an organised, law abiding society - justifies the means. Put simply, if you have a gun, you can make everyone else do what you think is right. A system traditionally associated with the old military juntas of South America, but in recent times best typified by Burma.

1945. The reality of Hitler's dictatorship. Millions died, most repugnantly in the concentration camps. The holocaust - genocide of many ethnic groups - could not have happened under a free press and a democratic system of government
1945. The reality of Hitler's dictatorship. Millions died, most repugnantly in the concentration camps. The holocaust - genocide of many ethnic groups - could not have happened under a free press and a democratic system of government | Source

Disadvantages of Democracy

In this section and the next I weigh up the pros and cons of democracy. It is only fair to try to present both sides, so first I will point out some of the drawbacks of a democratic system.

1) Short term benefit at the expense of long term progress. Foremost among the disadvantages perhaps is the fact that politicians and citizens are human beings prone to normal human weaknesses. If democratic elections have to be held on a regular and frequent basis, then those politicians' jobs are on the line on a regular basis. No one likes losing a position of power, and no one likes losing their jobs, and it is in a politician's interest to try to hang on to theirs. Sadly, human nature also decrees that the electorate have their own selfish interests - like it or not, most people will vote for a better standard of living today, rather than an end to global warming or increased prosperity thirty years down the line. Politicians in a democracy tend to pander to that selfishness. They tend to instigate short term policies for short term gain. Long term policies to benefit the planet or our children's children will usually cost the politicians their jobs if it leads to hardships for the population today. A strong dictator is not subject to such worries for his own job, and could ignore his people and theoretically carry out long term policies for the greater good of the country and the world.

(In practice of course dictators - even more so than democratic leaders - are usually more interested in their own self-interest than in the future of their nation or planet).

2) The disruptive inconvenience of elections. A related issue in democracies, is that every election year the business of governing the country effectively comes to a halt. Little practical can be achieved as politicians fight their own battles for survival. The election may bring about a change of government, and new personnel at the top, fresh faces inexperienced in the highly responsible jobs which they are now taking on. Policies may be reversed from one government to the next - hardly good news for the idea of stable progressive development of a package of policies.

(But perhaps better than the continuous promulgation of bad policies - an affliction which served the totalitarian Soviet Union poorly for 70 years).

3) The disadvantage of non-free thinking party politics. In most democracies, too many of the politicians are a waste of intellect, as loyalty to the party is deemed all-important. Too many politicians don't think for themselves or vote according to their beliefs - instead they vote according to the way the party tells them to vote.

(I could of course point out that free-thinking is also not necessarily encouraged in undemocratic regimes either!)

4) The disadvantage of adversarial party systems. A second party related issue (particularly in my country) is the adversarial system whereby rival parties feel duty-bound to oppose each other and condemn each other's point of view at every opportunity. So much time is wasted in parliament with stupid sniping, taunting and bickering, when constructive analytical debate would be more helpful. A compulsion to oppose rivals seems irresistible - if Party A develops a policy with ten advantages and one small drawback, you can bet your bottom dollar that Party B will focus on the drawback, and so try to discredit the whole package.

(Dictators are free from adversarial politics - they imprison or execute adversaries).

1945. Winston Churchill, Franklin D Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin meet at Yalta. The seeds of 40 years of 'cold war' and dictatorship throughout Eastern Europe were sown at the end of the Second World War
1945. Winston Churchill, Franklin D Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin meet at Yalta. The seeds of 40 years of 'cold war' and dictatorship throughout Eastern Europe were sown at the end of the Second World War | Source

Advantages of Democracy

1) Democracy provides for changes in government and policy without violence. This is quite remarkable when you think about it. In democratic elections, huge levels of power can be transferred from one group or from one individual to another by peaceful means. In a non-democratic system, it is almost impossible for a very radical change of direction to occur without major civil unrest or civil war, military coup, or assassination.

2) Democracy prevents arrogant monopoly by the ruling regime. Democratic government is bound by an election term after which it has to submit itself to a popular vote to retain authority. The ruling regime has to make sure it works for its people. It cannot ignore the people if it is to remain in power.

3) Democracy lends authority to the government. A president or prime minister who has won victory in a free election retains a moral authority to speak which no unelected leader possesses. Even if the leader is not universally liked and no longer supported, the majority of the population will at least respect his/her right to govern until the end of his term of office.

4) Democracy ensures a sense of belonging to a society. One important facet of democracy is that the people feel a sense of participation in the process of choosing their government, and the making of decisions. Even in true democracies, people may complain about feeling ostracised in society, and of their voices remaining unheard, because unfortunately not everyone can have their views acted upon favourably, but at least in a democracy there is the opportunity to be heard - try openly criticising the government in an authoritarian one party state or dictatorship and see what happens.

5) Democracy ensures freedom of the press and judiciary. Press freedom and independence of the police and judiciary is only truly possible in a democracy. Even here, governments may seek to limit such freedoms, sometimes with reasonable justification (for example to secure the nation against acts of terrorism or espionage), but at least in a democracy, the level of freedom in society can be openly debated. The pressure group 'Reporters Without Borders' which campaigns for the journalistic freedom to report without censorship, publishes an annual list of countries ranked according to restrictions on freedom of information. (See [4] for latest report, or [1] for 2010 figures). Comparing this list of 179 nations to a table of democracy published by the Economist Intelligence Unit [5], and illustrated on Wikipedia's Democracy Index page [6], all of the 20 freest countries are described as democracies or 'flawed democracies'. Almost all the bottom 20 - the least free - are authoritarian regimes.

6) Democracy is a fundamental right. Finally, I return to the main theme of this piece. Although there are undoubted disadvantages to the democratic process, as well as advantages, one single point outweighs all others:

It is unarguably, unquestionably wrong that one person or one group of human beings should by sheer force of might or accident of birth, dominate all other human beings and dictate without constraint, how they should lead their lives.

1968. Soviet tanks crush the Czechoslovakian bid for freedom from Communist oppression, as one young Czech bravely protests and clambers on to a Soviet tank and waves the national flag - an image with echoes in the Tiananmen photo
1968. Soviet tanks crush the Czechoslovakian bid for freedom from Communist oppression, as one young Czech bravely protests and clambers on to a Soviet tank and waves the national flag - an image with echoes in the Tiananmen photo | Source

Mechanisms and Procedures of Democratic Election

How a democratic government may be constituted, and how rights and ideals are exercised and regulated, is a matter for each individual nation to determine, as unfortunately there can be no perfect electoral system which will always produce the result which exactly mirrors the wishes of all the people.

In truth there are a great many ways of practising democracy and very many ways of electing democratic governments ranging from 'direct democracy' (full public participation in decision making via referendums and similar devices) to 'parliamentary democracy' (citizens elect politicians to represent them in a legislative assembly, and these politicians then decide who will govern) to 'presidential democracy' (in which the public directly elect the nation's head of state, and possibly a separate and independent legislature).

My country - the United Kingdom - is a parliamentary democracy in which there has long been an impassioned debate concerning the best system by which to elect a government. Arguments have raged for decades over whether 'first past the post ' or 'majority election' (the system currently employed) or 'proportional representation', is the most effective and democratic method. Without wishing to enter into that debate here, there are clear plusses and minuses for both systems relating to the fairness of political representation, the accountability of individual Members of Parliament to the people who elect them, and the stability of the resulting Government (See [3] for assessment of the pros and cons). The important point is that both systems are genuine attempts to produce effective and fair government through the will of the people, and as such both are democratic.

Many other issues remain perennially open for discussion. How long should the term of office of an elected parliament be? Both short term government of four years as in the case of America, and a longer term of seven years - until recently the norm for the French presidency - have their advantages and disadvantages. And who should have the vote? Ordinary law abiding men and women certainly. What about young people? Aged 21? Or 18? Or 16? What about criminals? Petty thieves or violent offenders? What about people with learning difficulties? Should the right to vote be open to all, or just a major part of the population? How should majority rule be regulated to avoid the oppression of the minority? Or should it be regulated at all? Conflicts of interest abound ; one man's right to be free from racial abuse is another man's restriction on freedom of speech. There are a multitude of issues and for most there is no clear right or wrong answer. All modern democracies continue to search for the magic formula, which - rather like the philosphopher's stone - does not exist.

The purpose of this little discourse is to make clear that whilst individual nations may differ over how best to exercise the right of the people to determine the governance of their country, the important point is that the fundamental principles of democracy should not be compromised. Whatever system is employed, the intent must be democratic - to produce a Government or leadership or a system of establishing laws and policies which involves, and has the support or at least the acceptance of, the majority of the people.

Freedom of the Press - (Reporters Without Borders)

Map of the world compiled by 'Reporters Without Borders' showing levels of press freedom. Dark blue represents the countries with least press restraints, dark red, the countries with most. Unsurprisingly securely established democracies fare best
Map of the world compiled by 'Reporters Without Borders' showing levels of press freedom. Dark blue represents the countries with least press restraints, dark red, the countries with most. Unsurprisingly securely established democracies fare best | Source
1974. Richard Nixon was forced to resign after the Watergate Scandal. Although the high and mighty have power to influence, manipulate, and deceive, in a democracy even the most powerful may be peacefully removed from office
1974. Richard Nixon was forced to resign after the Watergate Scandal. Although the high and mighty have power to influence, manipulate, and deceive, in a democracy even the most powerful may be peacefully removed from office | Source

To Fight for King and Country, or Democracy?

The cllchéd defence of the people implicated in Nazi atrocities in World War Two, was that they were 'only obeying orders'. Should one fight for one's national leader in time of war? Or for one's country? Or for some other reason? (Note, this is not a question of pacifism, which is another issue entirely - we are assuming a case for war may on occasion exist.)

No one should feel obliged to fight for their leader if the said leader is not democratically elected. Why should they? A man or party which has gained power through force of military might, who has ruthlessly suppressed all dissent, and who has not allowed opposition to their rule by peaceful means, has no moral legitimacy whatsoever, and there is no reason to respect their decrees.

And it follows that one should also not feel obliged to fight for their country, if the country is ruled by such a man or such a party. Frankly it is better by far to be deemed unpatriotic than to fight for a cause which is evil. But would it really have been unpatriotic for Germans in the 1930s and 40s to have refused to fight for a nation led by a tyrant who was set on violent overthrow of sovereign democracies and racial annihilation? I think not.

Of course, the reality of the situation frequently conflicts with the ethics. To refuse to fight may well risk denunciation and severe punishment as a traitor or a deserter, as well as persecution of one's family. So one cannot necessarily condemn those who fight in the cause of an evil regime, but one can at least state that patriotism is most definitely not a justifiable excuse for fighting.

To sum up, one should not feel obliged to fight for an unelected leader, and one should not feel obliged to fight for a country if the cause is wrong and is advocated by a leader with no legitimacy. Fighting for a democracy is different. I am well aware that many condemn Western governments which 'meddle' in the affairs of other nations, such as has happened all too frequently in recent years, notably in Iraq and Afghanistan, but whatever one's views on the rights and wrongs of those wars, at least they were conducted by governments with the legitimacy of being elected by popular vote, subject to a free exchange of opinions and criticisms, and open to subsequent rejection by the people.

1977. Jean-Bédel Bokassa of the third world Central African Republic, crowned himself  'Emperor'  with enough extravagence to make the Queen of England look poverty striken. He was overthrown two years later.
1977. Jean-Bédel Bokassa of the third world Central African Republic, crowned himself 'Emperor' with enough extravagence to make the Queen of England look poverty stricken. He was overthrown two years later. | Source

Western Policy Towards Democracy

For decades now, it has seemed to many that the priority of some Western Governments including Britain and America has been to support any nation which favours them, irrespective of whether that nation is democratic or whether it is an unfree regime. Time and time again, such misguided policy has come back to bite us. Thus the United States supported the Shah of Iran, and America at one time supported Saddam Hussein (because he was at war with Iran under the Ayatollahs). Now they support Saudi Arabia, most notably in the field of arms sales, despite the autocratic nature of that regime. Such policies inevitably antagonise the populations of undemocratic pro-western governments, and may well leave the citizens of those countries with a residual grudge against America for supporting the regime which oppresses them.

The only sensible, safe and righteous course of action for any democratic nation to follow is first and foremost to support other democracies, irrespective of their wealth, their foreign policies or political leanings. Dictatorships, however powerful they are, will eventually fall - that is the destiny of any regime which lacks the clear-thinking respect of the majority. Democracies on the other hand tend not to fall; they tend to grow in strength.

It is therefore prudent as well as moral for all democracies to support each other.

1989. A lone civilian defies the tanks during the Chinese repression of Tiananmen Square freedom of speech protests. It is still not known whether this peaceful demonstrator was executed by the authorities
1989. A lone civilian defies the tanks during the Chinese repression of Tiananmen Square freedom of speech protests. It is still not known whether this peaceful demonstrator was executed by the authorities | Source

Complacency in Democracies and Respect for the Right to Democratic Government

Democracy in the west, where the principle is long established, is often dismissed in a rather ambivalent, blasé way. It constantly irritates just how many people equate behaviour of political leaders in democracies with the behaviour of unrepresentative, ruthlessly suppressive political leaders in autocratic regimes. Whilst everyone is happy to exercise their rights in democracies, too many fail to appreciate the good fortune of living under such an ethos, and the inherent right of others in other societies to enjoy democracy too.

All too frequently, even here in Britain - sometimes considered the mother of all democratic governments - intelligent apologists for dictatorial regimes will make patronising statements. Examples include: 'the culture of Country X is not suited to democracy', and 'a strong leader is required in Country Y to maintain law and order'. And they will suggest that we in the west 'have no right or are in no position to tell other people how to run their affairs' (ignoring the fact that it is usually not the people, but an individual or a ruthless clique who decides how another country runs its affairs). All these comments have been heard in British political debates.

Comments like these legitimise authoritarian rule, even though the people who utter such comments, would never dream of sanctioning such control over their own lives. Certainly there may be occasions when strong leadership is required, possibly for example in the aftermath of a civil war, but such times should be brief and should be guided by the over-riding principal of moving as swiftly as possible to democracy.

1989. Eventually Communist repression of Eastern Europe had to end. West Berliners help East Berliners escape over the Berlin Wall -symbol of the divide between freedom and dictatorship - on 10th November 1989
1989. Eventually Communist repression of Eastern Europe had to end. West Berliners help East Berliners escape over the Berlin Wall -symbol of the divide between freedom and dictatorship - on 10th November 1989 | Source

Any Country Can Embrace Democracy

Examples of democracy shine out like beacons of light in all cultures in all parts of the world - in southern Africa, free nations such as Namibia and Botswana, and S.Africa itself, show what can be achieved. In Northern Africa, Mali* is one of the poorest nations on Earth, and its population is 90% Muslim, and yet it has become a tolerant and free nation, respectful of minorities, and it is a democracy - Islam and poverty are clearly no barriers to the process of free government if the will is present. In Central and South America, most countries are now democracies and nations like Costa Rica and Uruguay stand out as being the equal of any European or North American democracy. And in Asia, South Korea and Taiwan are free nations (which must be protected at all costs from their powerful and less than totally friendly neighbours). And who in the west would think that Mongolia might be one of the most liberal countries in the region? Yet it is making great strides in that direction. Finally India - if any country is least suited to democracy, surely it is India with its history of colonialism, ancient caste systems, religious divides, extreme poverty and disease. And yet India is stable, and progressing fast - because it is democratic, and its governments have a history of good reason.

All nations and cultures are suited to democracy, when the process is adequately and effectively explained, and administered in a manner free from corruption [7]. The majority of people in all countries want to decide their own future, and voice their own opinions; nobody in the west should ever be under the delusion that they do not.


* This was written in 2012. Since then, Mali has sadly been the victim of incursions by extremist Islamic factions. At the Mali Government's request, French forces have become involved in helping this poor nation try to re-establish its control over all the country. One sincerely hopes that the mission is successful - despite setbacks which are not of its own making, Mali has retained a reputation as one of the most civilised nations in Africa, and must not be allowed to fall under the control of terrorists.

1990. South Africa's white minority could not have realistically hoped to hold on to its power, when democratic rights were denied to the black majority. Nelson Mandela was released from prison on 11th February
1990. South Africa's white minority could not have realistically hoped to hold on to its power, when democratic rights were denied to the black majority. Nelson Mandela was released from prison on 11th February | Source

Differentiating Between the Failings of Democracy and Failings of its Leaders

I know full well that some who read this will view many of the political actions of democracies with the deep suspicion. They will see every action taken by politicians in a cynical light, they will see darkness in all intentions, they will point to scandals, lies, deceit and broken promises, and they will see sinister conspiracies in every action. They will say all politicians are corrupt, and that we are in no position to preach to others until we have put our own house in order. I am certainly no different in mistrusting politicians, though perhaps I am not quite so cynical as this.

Be that as it may, such matters are an irrelevance in this discussion. Democracy is a moral code by which a civilised society exists, and which politicians are obliged to work within. Politicians are human beings, no different to the rest of us. They have their own motivations, self-interests and fallibilities. Some are honest and genuine and some cannot be trusted, and they will try to exploit their positions for personal gain. But that is not the fault of democracy. It is the fault of human nature. At least in a democracy there is a possibility of uncovering excesses and abuses of power, and of bringing down a leader tainted by corruption or scandal; in a nation without free speech and a genuine opposition, the ruler can act without restraint.

Do not confuse democratic failings with the human failings of politicians who work within the system.

1991. Mikhail Gorbachev. For all the power of the Soviet Union, the moment an enlightened leader relaxed a few rigid controls, the whole communist Eastern bloc collapsed like a pack of cards, including the Soviet Union itself
1991. Mikhail Gorbachev. For all the power of the Soviet Union, the moment an enlightened leader relaxed a few rigid controls, the whole communist Eastern bloc collapsed like a pack of cards, including the Soviet Union itself | Source

Accuracy of Statistics - a Note of Caution

One problem with writing an article such as this is how to the assess the reliability of information. On this page, quite a significant proportion of the statistical information comes from an organisation called Freedom House [8], welcomed for the quality of its maps detailing the issues of world liberty and democracy.

This organisation has been described as an independent, non-governmental organization, and its motives and intentions seem fair and good. But it is only right to point out in the interests of honest analysis, that some governments, such as Russia, China, Sudan and Cuba have regularly expressed scepticism about the autonomy and impartiality of Freedom House. Some directly accuse it of being used by the American Government to further its aims, and indeed, Freedom House itself has acknowledged its support for America's leading role in the defence of human rights issues in the world, whilst also condemning some of the allies of America for their human rights records. Some prominent Americans praise Freedom House's integrity and independence, whilst other Americans openly criticise its agenda. [9]

Certainly some of the designations on the maps included do not quite match. In the first map on this page, 'Basic Freedoms and Rights 2005 - Freedom House', the nation of Russia - though far from perfect - seems unfairly scored as 'entirely unfree', and certainly other authorities look on that country a little more favourably. The 'Economist Intelligence Unit' describes Russia as a hybrid regime with some form of democracy [1], and the second map on this page, 'Basic Freedoms and Rights 2003 - Polity IV', also portrays Russia in a better light. This kind of discrepancy does not necessarily indicate a political agenda other than the basic one of promoting democracy - it may merely indicate different priorities on certain criteria of freedom, and in most cases the maps do tally significantly.

The advice is to consider all evidence carefully, and maybe the best indicator as to a nation's democratic credentials is to assess whether an open discussion of its human rights record is permitted within its borders. All truly free countries allow this, and the third map, 'Freedom of the Press - Reporters Without Borders', reflects this.

2009. The inauguration of Barack Obama. Whatever one's view about America, peaceful transfer of power after a free vote, with information freely available to all, can only happen in a democracy. That is undeniable
2009. The inauguration of Barack Obama. Whatever one's view about America, peaceful transfer of power after a free vote, with information freely available to all, can only happen in a democracy. That is undeniable | Source

The History of Democratic Change - Prior to the 20th Century

Perhaps the surest indication of both the moral rectitude of democracy and the stability of democratic nations, is the ever increasing number of nations which have embraced and retained this way of life. Totalitarian states and dictatorships fall or are reformed - it is as inevitable as night following day. The only question mark is over how long it takes. Democracies on the other hand, almost never fall, once they have stabilised and people have grown accustomed to the concept and the freedoms and rights which they offer.

The history of democracy is that it got off to a slow start. Despite its ancient origins, and the gradual erosion of dictatorial power through such momentous events as the signing of Magna Carta, and civil war against the absolute power of King Charles I in England (resulting in his execution by parliamentary force), it was in the 18th and 19th centuries that a wave of democratisation brought about significant changes to Western Europe and America. However for the most part these changes were still introducing only a partial democracy. Restrictions on who could vote in elections limited the electorate in most countries to less than 50%, ordinarily excluding the poor, either intentionally, or institutionally (due to an inability to read or write), and almost always excluding women and people of a different race. It was not until 1893, that one nation - New Zealand - instigated 'universal suffrage' allowing all adults - men and women of all races - to vote equally in elections. The United States and Great Britain delayed votes for women until the 20th century.

The Rise in Freedom over Two Centuries

This graph gives an illustration of the rise in nations with free political systems. since 1800. On this freedom graph, nations scoring +8 or more on the Polity IV scale are charted. (On this scale -10 is total autocracy, +10 is full democracy)
This graph gives an illustration of the rise in nations with free political systems. since 1800. On this freedom graph, nations scoring +8 or more on the Polity IV scale are charted. (On this scale -10 is total autocracy, +10 is full democracy) | Source
2009. Indian women queue to vote, each clutching their polling cards. India, despite its numerous historic problems of poverty, caste and religious division, has held together and is prospering - democratic stability in action
2009. Indian women queue to vote, each clutching their polling cards. India, despite its numerous historic problems of poverty, caste and religious division, has held together and is prospering - democratic stability in action | Source

The History of Democratic Change in the 20th Century

It was in the 20th century that big change took place. This took two forms - first there was the increased representation of the people in those countries which had already been practising limited forms of democracy, such as the movement to universal suffrage which was mentioned above. Secondly there was the emergence of new democracies, which is really the subject of this section. As can be seen in the Polity IV graph above, the progress towards world democratisation has - with the exception of the years leading up to WW2 - been relentless, albeit very much a case of two steps forward and one step backwards.

Collapse of the Ottoman-Hungarian Empire at the end of World War One, generated several new partial democracies in eastern Europe, but world economic collapse and depression in the 1920s proved a major set-back. Well established democracies like Britain and America had the stability to withstand such economic downturn, but in Germany and other nations it led to the rise of state fascism and dictatorship. The ultimate result of this was World War Two, and the total suspension of democratic principles throughout most of Europe, The end of war also saw one further major retrograde step - having appeased fascism in the 30's and in no mood for further conflict, the Western democracies now felt it necessary to appease their allies in this victory, the communist Soviet Union. As a result, many nations in Eastern Europe again found themselves under the yoke of an oppressive, undemocratic regime.

In retrospect however, The end of war also saw major advances in the cause of democracy. Former war-like states such as (West) Germany and Japan became models of constructing freedom out of devastation. The aftermath of World War Two also saw the gradual dismantling (usually voluntary) of old colonial empires, such as those of Britain, France and Portugal, leading to the emergence of new independent nations. At various times and with varying degrees of harmony, many of these new nations have since moved towards democracy. Most importantly of all, consolidation of democratic principles took place in Europe and America - as a result of this, today it would be unthinkable for a country like the USA which was theoretically neutral at the beginning of the Second World War, to stand by if a dictator like Adolf Hitler attempts to empire build, and overthrow other more liberal governments. This, I would suggest, was the time when stable democracies really came of age and recognised the fundamental virtue of their philosophy, and the need to defend it through the signing of treaties and the development of the Nato alliance in 1949.

Further liberalisations would continue worldwide including significant returns to the democratic fold in Spain and Portugal in the 1970s, whilst many of the nations of South America - for so long synonymous with military juntas - adopted electoral systems in the 70s and 80s, graphically demonstrated by the steep rise on the Polity IV graph at this time. The failure of the Communist economies, social unrest in Poland and the struggle to compete with the free markets of the West, then led to the biggest single upturn in the fortunes of democracy - the fall of the Soviet Union. The enlightened president Mikhail Gorbachev introduced some liberal reforms and a new air of tolerance in Moscow was enough to encourage dissent against oppression; 1989 became perhaps the third most momentous year of the 20th century after the World War ceasefires in 1918 and 1945, as so many millions of people throughout eastern Europe experienced freedom of expression for the first time in their lives. Progress continued in the 1990s including in Africa, symbolised by the 'walk to freedom' of Nelson Mandela in South Africa. Over recent decades, one by one, the old fashioned tyrant dictators of Africa and elsewhere have been swept from power.

This graph by Freedom House shows the trend away from autocratic illiberal countries (red) to free democracies (green) towards the end of the 20th century
This graph by Freedom House shows the trend away from autocratic illiberal countries (red) to free democracies (green) towards the end of the 20th century | Source
2010. Mali in North Africa is one of the poorest countries in the world, and it is 90% Islamic. It is also one of the freest nations in africa - a nation which deserves our support in all kinds of ways
2010. Mali in North Africa is one of the poorest countries in the world, and it is 90% Islamic. It is also one of the freest nations in africa - a nation which deserves our support in all kinds of ways | Source

The Tide of Democratic Change in the 21st Century

If world war, decolonisation and economics were driving forces behind the push for human freedom in the 20th century, increasing affluence has assisted the process in the 21st century. In China, it will be difficult to sustain the current levels of growth without greater freedom of expression in the future, at least in the economic world. But another factor has been of increasing significance. A controlled press has always been regarded as a pre-requisite for a dictatorial state to survive. With a free press, the people can understand and appreciate the failings of their leaders and the quality of life they have and how this is comparable to standards in other countries. It's not difficult for an authoritarian regime to clamp down on a free printed press, and home-grown dissidents. but today of course, these are not the only ways in which the public can be informed. Increased international travel, the rise of the Internet and growth of international communication including the rapidly developed mobile phone network, are undoubtedly contributing to greater aspirations for freedom in the 21st century. Even in repressive regimes, it is becoming difficult for the governments to suppress knowledge of basic freedoms and injustices being made known to the people. What's more, the Internet and mobile phone services are also enabling opposition groups to co-ordinate their acts of resistance against their undemocratic governments.

It has been suggested by some groups such as the Economist Intelligence Unit, that democracy has recently been in decline as a new down turn in economic fortunes, disenchantment with pace of change in new democracies, and backsliding in some former Soviet bloc countries has seen entrenched governments consolidating their power. [1] Inevitably there will be retrograde steps in world democratisation, but I do not believe that this can be a long term trend - statistical evidence throughout the last 200 years and the inherent stability of a way of life voted upon by the masses suggests that the future remains bright for democracy. Indeed recent events in the Arab world have shown how many people even in this most problematic part of the world, appear to have a thirst for democracy, or at least for freedom of expression.

The good news is that polls suggest the majority in developing nations do indeed appreciate the virtue of basic concepts of freedom and liberty, and this is what they associate democracy with, even if they are unfamiliar with mechanisms of electoral procedures. It also seems that increased prosperity associated with democracy is a relatively minor consideration even among the poor - important, because whilst liberty and free speech can be rapidly introduced, upturns in economic benefits take longer, and could easily lead to disillusionment with the democratic process if this is not appreciated [10].

2011. Colonel Gaddafi, at the time of writing the latest tyrant to fall from power. This comment will undoubtably soon be out of date, as further despots fall. Hopefully, though not certainly, liberal democracy will now come to the nation of Libya
2011. Colonel Gaddafi, at the time of writing the latest tyrant to fall from power. This comment will undoubtably soon be out of date, as further despots fall. Hopefully, though not certainly, liberal democracy will now come to the nation of Libya | Source

At the Time of Writing ...

This was written early in 2012. We have just been through a year to be remembered for the so-called 'Arab Spring' in which echoes of the fall of the Communist nations of 1989 were repeated in the Middle East. First Tunisia, then Egypt, and then so many other countries - Libya, Bahrain, Yemen, Syria - saw major uprisings, while many more saw people coming out on to the streets in lesser protests.

At the time of writing, in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, undemocratic governments have recently fallen. In Tunisia, free elections were held for the first time in October. In other countries, leading ministers have been dismissed, political prisoners have been released, and concessions on constitutional reforms have been introduced in efforts to assuage the peoples' demands. But in some - notably Syria, which will quite possibly be the next country to experience the downfall of its government - protest has been met with violent suppression and the killing of unarmed civilian protesters. And even when reform has occurred, the road to true democracy is not straight. In Egypt, protest at the Government of President Mubarak has been replaced by protest at the perceived reluctance of the military to instigate further reforms and full democracy. People who want to hang on to unrepresentative power put as many obstacles into the way of democracy as they can.

But such obstacles can only be temporary barriers when viewed from the historical perspective - a holding exercise be it lasting a few months, a few years, or a decade or more. Eventually, the majority desire of the population will, I believe. have its way. In October 2011, Colonel Gaddafi of Libya became the latest dictator to feel the wrath of ordinary people. Who will be next? And in which part of the world?

2011. An anti-government activist raises a bloody hand during a  funeral procession for a demonstrator killed in protests against the Syrian regime on 23rd  April 2011. Just one of thousands of victims. The struggle continues
2011. An anti-government activist raises a bloody hand during a funeral procession for a demonstrator killed in protests against the Syrian regime on 23rd April 2011. Just one of thousands of victims. The struggle continues | Source

Conclusion

I repeat something I wrote in the introduction to this piece. I am only an ordinary member of the public - that, in a democracy, gives me the right to a say. Equally, others can have their say, including in the 'Comments' section below. Please do so, and I'll welcome any constructive comments. I am especially concerned that my factual statements (as opposed to my opinions) are all accurate, so feel free to point out any factual errors if they exist, or political developments which change the world picture, and I will amend the piece accordingly.

Any impartial review of the facts will show that on almost any criterion that really matters - stability, freedom of speech, political persecution, religious tolerance, equal rights for women, independence of the police and judiciary, torture, commitment to UN peacekeeping operations, wealth and health and life expectancy and literacy, and also altruistic actions such as overseas aid and the granting of political asylum to refugees - democracies consistently score more favourably than non-democracies.

I hope the conclusion to this piece is obvious. There is no justification under any circumstances for an established nation to reject democracy. Whether on grounds of religious belief, political philosophy or economic growth, there is no excuse for any leader - king, revolutionary or soldier - or any political party, to deny grown adult men and women the right to decide their own future.

This essay is written to remind all who live under democracy that this is a way of doing things which should be defended and protected at all costs in all nations. It is also written as a token of moral support and encouragement to those who promote democracy and freedom of speech in countries where self-imposed leaders cling to their trappings of power and dictate how others should live their lives.

Thank you for reading.

Copyright

Please feel free to quote limited text from this article, on condition that an active link back to this page is included

© 2012 Greensleeves Hubs

More by this Author


I'd Love to Hear Your Comments. Thanks, Alun 17 comments

pramodgokhale profile image

pramodgokhale 16 months ago from Pune( India)

Sir,

Again i interact.India is a third world nation but lucky because during British regime civilian society was made but other third world nations lack civilian society so most of them are non-democratic under military dictators or religious fanatic or fundamentalists like Iran.

it is a long journey to develop mindset or forward thinking.

Uni polar world Under US will not do good for grass root people of poor nation.

Might is right is a jungle law still prevails.


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 17 months ago from Essex, UK Author

JON EWALL; Thanks for that magnanimous response Jon. In recent times, U.S politics does seem so much more polarised than here in the UK, where differences between the major parties appear minor by comparison. I know from visits to various U.S websites (both conservative and liberal) that feelings run very high on some issues. :) Alun


JON EWALL profile image

JON EWALL 17 months ago from usa

Lun

Your rejection of my comments are not offensive to me as that is your proragative in hub world.

Here in the US , the liberal media has not been as fair in reporting the political news.

Thank you for listing the links for the US viewers. I am not affiliated with any political parties for your information.


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 17 months ago from Essex, UK Author

Jon Ewall; Thank you. I deleted your original comment because the main purpose of it seemed to be to promote six active links. As I understand it, too many active links are not looked on kindly by the search engines. Whatever the truth of that, I do not actually mind an occasional referral, but these six links were largely irrelevant, other than to push the idea that Barack Obama is an illegal president, to be seen in the worst possible light. Some of the links imply that he is a communist, Muslim, non-American, anti-American fraudster with associations to Chicago mobsters and terrorists who plan ‘to kill 25 million people‘!

Most of what appears is at best extremely biased, and at worst total myth and conspiracy nonsense. Democracy, Jon, is about accepting democratic elections even if the victor is not of the party or politician you support. It is not about spreading unsubstantiated rumours which some of these links do. The whole point of my article is not to score party political points for 'left' or 'right', but simply to point out the virtue as I see it of democracy.

I have however, reprinted your comment as I believe in free speech. If people wish to read the links they may cut and paste them. If you wish to comment again however, please try to make it a pro or anti democracy comment, or else a comment on elements of the article I’ve written, rather than a resource for anti-Obama links. Thanks. Alun


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 17 months ago from Essex, UK Author

THE FOLLOWING COMMENT WAS SUBMITTED BY JON EWALL. I DELETED IT BECAUSE OF THE NUMBER AND NATURE OF ACTIVE LINKS IN THE COMMENT. HOWEVER, IT IS REPRINTED HERE WITH THE LINKS DEACTIVATED. Greensleeves Hubs

Alun.

A very interesting hub covering many aspects of what democracy can mean in the society of today . Check these links, one is about what has happened in Libya and Egypt, the other is about voting problems in the US today

1. 3/20/11 President Barak Obama - Advocate of Democracy and Revolution jon-ewall.hubpages.com/hub/PresidentBarakOb...

2. 10/24/14 Jaw-Dropping Study Claims Large Numbers of Non-Citizens Vote in US www.nationalreview.com/campaign-spot/391134...

The Constitution of the US is under attack by the ruling party only due to the party's officials having decided to support the party in lieu of working for the benefits of the people who elected them to office.

Elections Do Have Consequences

GEE, www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5CsrTMZAhA WHOIS WHO in Gov commieblaster.com/progressives/index.html?v...

SHARED AGENDAS BARACK OBAMA

www.discoverthenetworks.org/viewsubcategory...

3/5 /15 A crippled presidency www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/mar/5/don...


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 3 years ago from Essex, UK Author

pramod gokhale; Thank you very much for your further comment. It is interesting to hear your views, with which I very much agree. You mention Indira Gandhi - of course even in democracies, the politicians are human beings, and human beings are fallible and may be tempted to try to abuse their power. The strength of democracy is that it is always greater than the politicians who serve the people, and can topple the Government and Prime Minister peacefully if that is what the people wish.

No doubt there will be further problems for India to face in the future, as there are in all countries. It has always been my belief that first and foremost, democracies should help and favour other democracies, because these are the only countries in which leaders have a legitimacy to govern given to them by the people. So I trust that Indian democracy will always be backed and supported by powerful nations like America and the countries of Western Europe. Best wishes to you. Alun.


pramodgokhale profile image

pramodgokhale 3 years ago from Pune( India)

Sir,

thank you for reply to my comment.

The journey of Indian democracy ,has had milestones.Under nehru it was a glory.His daughter Indira Gandhi declared Emergency to save nation but actually court cancelled her election due to some malpractices and she dishonored court verdict ot judgement and arrested opposition parties leaders and workers and imprisoned them for one and half year.Then she declared election in 1977 march and opposition do not have time to organize but they also contested election and Indira a sitting prime minister was defeated in her constitunecy.

This was a triumph in India's history. First time congress party was ousted from cneter.Illiterate voters decided to change government and they did it.

RTI,Right to information act is already in force so any indian can question how government scheme performed and lapses , bureaucracy is accountable to the people and Indian Union.In case of failed on work or performance government officers are getting punished or suspened from employment and the process showed some positive results.

By and large Indian society is feudal and routine oriented, but economy is liberalized and globalization is reversible, so indian corporates are looking outward and sensing innovation and changes.

Sir, unfortunately our neighbors are undemocratic and India is surrounded by failed nations so it is affecting our economic progress and defence expenditure is eating our development base.

Thank you for very practical hub from you.

pramod gokhale


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 3 years ago from Essex, UK Author

pramod gokhale; I am so glad to receive your comment from India. As you will be aware from my mention of India in this article, I have great respect for the way in which India has developed as a democracy - it is perhaps the most admirable aspect of your country's history, and one of which you are justifiably proud.

There have been so many obstacles to India's success - religious, cultural, economic and environmental - that I am quite sure that respect for free speech and the democratic right to vote the government peacefully into power and out of power, is a key factor which has kept India stable and increasingly prosperous.

I am glad you say that Indians know the importance of democracy - sometimes it takes many years before people fully appreciate the values of tolerance, free speech and democracy, but India has now been a democratic nation for a long time, and stability strengthens with each year that passes. A shining example to other countries who may feel that democracy is not practical in their circumstances. Alun.


pramodgokhale profile image

pramodgokhale 3 years ago from Pune( India)

Really a great hub.I am an Indian, enjoying freedom of expression.Our first prime minister Nehru was staunch follower of democracy and democratic values and over 65 years , democracy has roots in our country and all registered political parties enjoyed power , so no one can blame this system.

Democracy is not necessarily part of capitalism and both are different systems.In India we have mixed economy under democracy, criitc says that Indian democracy is over restricted, yes to some extent.

Indian Union does not allow any province or state to separate from union and India can not afford another partition and democracy is intact so India is intact.

In long run it is confirmed that Indians know the importance of democracy, it was difficult to promote democracy in plural India of multi religion, lingual. It is a great achivement in a third world and India claimed her position in this century.

We hold elections as per schedule and one government goes out and another government comes in. Transfer of power is so smooth that we are proud of this process.

We introduce electronic voting machines with consensus of all political parties and experts and system proved worth and no chance for manipulation We export electronic voting machines!!

In this global economic crisis time people frustrated over existing systems including democracy

Democracy allows to restart career of a politicians in case of failure.

Thank you Sir,

pramod gokhale


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 4 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Thank you very much for visiting, Perspycacious, and for that very nice and encouraging comment. This subject matter is clearly one of the most important I have tackled on HubPages, so I have been interested to see how it is received. As such, your comment is much appreciated.

(Glad Derdriu's page appealed too - she and I have exchanged many comments and page readings over the past few months!)


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 4 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

I have read this great Hub and one from Derdriu this morning and you both set a high standard for writing, detail, and insights. I love this piece on Democracy. It should be a text for study and debate, for it does Democracy no harm.


Derdriu 4 years ago

Alun, Congratulations on your 50th hub! May there be many more (as well as many more of your photographs)!

Respectfully and appreciatively, Derdriu


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 4 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Derdriu - part two of my commentary reply! About the Monarchy.

Yes, the British Royal family certainly shouldn’t be involved in politics of a party political nature - of course some members of the family occasionally make injudicious comments (notably the Duke of Edinburgh!) - which are deemed ‘politically incorrect’ and may betray their private beliefs, and when they do, they usually spark some mild controversy. The Monarch is supposed to be neutral in party politics.

In Britain the royal family today has no genuine political power, as is only right in a democracy. The Queen, in addition to various other ceremonial roles, does officially appoint the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom - but in practice she has no choice. After a General election it is the leader of the majority party in parliament who will generally try to form a government. He/she has to go to Buckingham Palace to seek permission from the Queen to form a government, but this is a formality - the Queen is in no position to reject the application. In practice, the only rights the monarch has are to be consulted and to advise - she cannot go against the will of the democratically elected parliament - the last time a monarch dismissed a prime minister under any circumstances, was in 1834. (The last time a monarch tried to totally usurp parliamentary authority resulted in King Charles I being beheaded in 1649!!)

I’m not really a monarchist myself in the sense that I cannot accept a king or queen as being any better than anyone else simply by virtue of their birthright. But I can enjoy the ceremonials, and I can appreciate the unifying historical link and sense of identity which the King or Queen provides between the present and the past - a link in this country which goes back at least a 1000 years.

One advantage of a monarchy put forward especially after Watergate was that in a constitutional monarchy, even if the Head of Government is involved in scandal, the Head of State remains untarnished as a figure free from the murkier dealings of the political world, and therefore someone the public can unite behind as a cohesive symbol of the nation.

Intriguing to think of America with a monarchy. I wonder who would be King today? (probably some obscure descendent of George Washington that nobody has heard of!)

Ever a pleasure to correspond with you Derdriu. Thank you for your interest in this page, and your thoughtful ideas.

Alun


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 4 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Derdriu, thank you for such a long and thoughtfully written comment (with very clear knowledge underlying it).

I chose for my 50th hub page to try something a little different - even maybe slightly controversal. I’m not really a very political person at all (in the sense of party politics) but I do strongly believe in basic moral freedoms and rights, and hence the choice of democracy as a subject matter.

I will reply to some of the points made in two comments; in the second, I'll talk about monarchy in the UK. In this one, I'll address the other points:

The mention of Chile brings to mind that this is one more country which made the move back towards democracy in the 1990s after a couple of decades of retrograde military government - a welcome move.

I decided to look up the Suriname constitution Derdriu following your comment, and it certainly reads as an enlightened document, much along the lines of the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights. You, as an American, are probably better placed than I am to understand the meaning of a 'constitution' and its value either as a legally binding document, a sacrosanct promise, or as a statement of ideals (we in the UK do not have a written constitution as such). Some of the phrases in the Suriname constitution read to me as statements of ideals - objectives to strive for, rather than a promise which must be delivered at all costs - for example, I believe unemployment in Suriname is currently just under 10%, so clearly if the right to work is regarded as a fundamental right by the Suriname Government, then they are failing in their constitutional duty to provide work for everyone. However, as an objective or an ideal to strive for, full employment is obviously commendable, and all due respect to Suriname for aiming so high.

I made a point of referring to Richard Nixon more than once on this page, not because of any personal feelings for or against him, but because Watergate in some ways showed American democracy at its very best. Even if there is corruption at the highest levels, even if political failings occur, and even if disenchantment with politics or government exists, an inherent respect for the stability and morality of the democratic process ensures that any crisis is temporary and can be overcome without violent insurrection.

I would imagine you know much more about the Viet Nam war than I do Derdriu, but I do wonder how the ‘decision makers’ made their decision, and what weighed heaviest in their minds, if it wasn’t - on some level at least - public opinion?


Derdriu 4 years ago

Alun, What an unexpected but typically informative, innovative, intelligent article which is supportive to the world's democracies! In particular, you excel at presenting the view from the inside and outside of democracy.

For example, it's most elucidating and helpful how you situate democracy within the realm of governing possibilities (dictatorship, military rule, monarchy, theocracy...) and within the determining context of the right to free speech and of an independent system of law and justice. Such could be said about Chile -- other than a minor intervention by the military in the very early 20th century -- until the overthrow of President Allende. Such especially remains true regarding Latin America's model economic/political/social democracy, Uruguay (other than the Tupamaros years).

Additionally, and in line with your impressive capability to differentiate the hues/shades/tints of colors, it's equally helpful how you explain the differences between aspirations and rights. Why do you think that a country such as Suriname includes within its constitutional "rights" those of working, improving one's lot, and having life-time access to education?

Especially interesting to me as an inhabitant on the other side of the pond is your emphasis on the peaceful transfer of power. For example, a president resigned, a president was indicted, and election results were not final until the month following the typical time at which the next president is selected. But each of these events occurred within a framework of peace no matter how strongly people felt for or against such happenings.

But along this same vein, how do you explain opposition to the Viet Nam war in the United States of America? President Nixon maintained that it was the decision of the decision-makers -- not the weight of popular opinion -- that ended the Viet Nam war.

Thank you for sharing such a careful, logical, provocative, reasonable, thoughtful political article.

Respectfully, Derdriu

P.S. As an after thought, what do you think of the newly formed USA seriously and thoughtfully considering monarchy as a contending governmental successor for the former colonies? It's my understanding that all U.S. presidents from President George Washington through President George W. Bush have royal ancestors (other than Presidents Eisenhower, Harding, Kennedy, and Truman, whose genealogies still are being sorted) in the not-too-distant past.

Also, is it true that the British royal family is not supposed to be involved in politics?


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 4 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Thank you snakeslane for your visit, and comments. This is the first 'political' page I have written (though I would regard it as moral rather than political in tone) so I wait with trepidation to see what comments are received. Yours makes a very nice start, which I appreciate.

Your reference to the Declaration of Independence clause is apposite. Centuries after these words were first uttered, the 'self evident' truths are still not sufficiently evident to far too many people in the world both in democracies and in non-democracies.

Alun


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

Thank you Greensleeves for this engrossing well illustrated essay on democracy. I wanted to respond with something clever and poetic... we hold these truths to be self evident etc...you've covered every aspect of what democracy means, and what it is, and how it is viewed and how it is skewed. Great Hub, snakeslane.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working