Healthcare Around the World

Healthcare systems vary around the world. It is a challenging issue because of the high costs required, aging populations and different cultural, economic, social and political situations. Health care ranges from preventative and lifestyle to catastrophic and long term care. Most wealthy countries have some sort of universal health care system with the exception of the United States. There is no easy answer and no one system is perfect. Following is an overview of health care around the world.

Source

NORTH AMERICA -

Canada -

Canada's health care system is publicly funded and adheres to guidelines set by the federal government. It is administered on a territorial or provincial basis. Individual citizens are provided preventative care and medical treatment as well as access to hospitals, surgical dentists and other medical care. All Canadian citizens qualify for health coverage no matter their income level or medical history. Approximately 9.5% of Canada's GDP is spent on healthcare. One problem is the shortage of doctors and nurses who feel better compensated elsewhere. Attracting and keeping skilled medical workers is a priority in Canadian politics. Despite all that, Canada boasts one of the highest life expectancies in the world (80 years) and the lowest infant mortality rate in all industrialized nations.


MEXICO -

The Mexican healthcare system is a pluralistic one combining private and public programs. Approximately 6.6% of Mexico's GDP is spent on healthcare that serves 40% of the privately employed population. The system consists of three components. The largest is the Social Security organization (IMSS) which is funded by employers, beneficiaries and the Mexican government. Funded by the federal government, the uninsured poor program covers about 40 million citizens. It offers basic but limited healthcare benefits. Lastly there's the private sector where individuals pay out-of-pocket for healthcare. Because it is very affordable there are about 3 million Mexicans who go this route as well as medical tourists. In general, Mexicans enjoy excellent healthcare. One problem is that rural areas are under-served and lack proper facilities. Life expectancy in Mexico is 76.41 years and the last decade has seen a huge improvement in the infant mortality rate.


UNITED STATES -

In the United States, health care is not so much a system as a combination of provisions by many separate legal entities. Most medical facilities are owned and operated by the private sector. Health insurance, on the other hand, is now largely provided by the government with programs such as Medicare, Veteran's Administration, Medicaid and others. Approximately 16% of the GDP is spent on healthcare in the United States. It is one of the only industrialized countries that does not ensure that all its citizens have health care coverage. Physicians in the United States are paid double that of doctors in Europe though wages vary by region. Many regulations are in place to protect consumers from fraudulent and substandard healthcare. Life expectancy in the United States is 78.2 years and there has been a steady decline in death rates in the last several years.

In 2010, President Barrack Obama signed the Affordable Care Act (also known as Obamacare) into law. It is intended to make health insurance more affordable for all citizens. It still faces challenges and is a work in progress.


SOUTH AMERICA -

BRAZIL -

The Brazilian healthcare system combines government health services, the private sector and non-profit health organizations. Medical facilities are ultra-modern and use state-of-the-art equipment and technology. Sao Paulo was recently recognized as one of the 47 world-class centers for medical technological innovations. All services and treatments are free and there are no charges for non-Brazilians at public hospitals. This attracts medical tourism though many choose private hospitals which offer reasonable costs. Physicians are paid up to three times more to work in the poorest areas of Brazil. Approximately 7.9% of the GDP is spent on healthcare. One problem is that government hospitals are often crowded and waiting times can be long. Life expectancy in Brazil is 72.86 and rising. According to UNICEF, Brazil is among the 25 nations with the best overall improvement in survival rates for children under the age of five.


ARGENTINA -

In Argentina, the public sector's healthcare is managed and funded by Obras Sociales which is an umbrella organization for Argentina'a trade unions. There are over 300 chapters of Obras Sociales in Argentina, each organized by the occupation it represents. There are over 8 million beneficiaries covered by Obras Sociales insurance plans and the top thirty chapters hold 73% of them. Services vary greatly in quality and by organization. Argentina spends approximately 10.1% of the GDP on healthcare. Due to economic problems which began in 2001, more Argentine citizens are being forced to use the public system as unemployment rises. This is a highly decentralized system and is often left to local townships to deal with. American, Swiss and other Latin American health care providers are increasingly opening the market to private insurance. Life expectancy in Argentina is 76.95.


CHILE -

Chile enjoys a very advanced health care system with well-trained doctors, state-of-the-art hospitals and regulation of standards that exceed most international standards. The country maintains a duel health care system where citizens can opt for a private health insurance company or for the public National Health Insurance Fund. The system is funded by a universal income tax deduction which amounts to about 7% of every worker's wages. Chile's private/public partnership is mostly effective and there is a growing emphasis on concentrating on certain chronic diseases where care is guaranteed and cost effectiveness assured. Chile spends approximately 5.4% of its GDP on health care. The country has seen a 50% reduction in child mortality in the last 16 years. Life expectancy in Chile is 78 years.


EUROPE -

NETHERLANDS -

All citizens of the Netherlands are required to purchase health insurance. The average cost of that insurance is (US)$127 per month. Insurers are either for-profit or non-profit and are regulated by the federal government. They are required to accept every resident within their coverage area no matter what preexisting conditions there may be. Everyone with the same policy pays the same premium. People under the age of 18 are covered at no cost. The government provides tax cuts and other measures to help low-income citizens afford insurance. Long term care is funded by social insurance which is funded by earmarked taxation. The Netherlands spends approximately 9.9% of its GDP on healthcare. Life expectancy is 79.68 years.


FRANCE -

The French have access to some of the best health care in the world. All citizens pay mandatory health insurance. An automatic premium is deducted from employees' pay and this is based on income. Taxes on alcohol and gambling are directed toward health care and those receiving social services must also contribute. Recently, the government has required some co-payments for services (approximately 1.45 USD for doctor's visits and 20-25 USD a day for hospital stays and procedures). This helps to offset rising health care costs. On element to the French insurance system is that the more ill the person, the less they pay. Treatment for serious illnesses are reimbursed 100%. Doctors in France pay no tuition for medical school and malpractice insurance is inexpensive. France spends approximately 11.2% of their GDP on health care. Life expectancy is 81. 19 years.


ICELAND -

Iceland's health care system is progressive and well-organized. Citizens there are some of the healthiest in the world. No private health sector exists in Iceland. Regardless of status, all citizens receive health care under the state-run service. The central government funds its health care through taxation. Taxes are based on a percentage of an individual's wages. Iceland has health care centers in different districts. These centers are visited regularly by doctors and specialists who are employed by the government. Every citizen must register with a General Practitioner of their choice. Every area has a doctor on call 24 hours a day. Iceland has more doctors per head of population than anywhere else. The country spends approximately 9.1% of its GDP on healthcare. Life Expectancy is 80.67 years.


ASIA -

CHINA -

The health care system in China is badly in need of reform. Medical training is highly variable and hospitals range from first-class facilities to overhauled boarding houses depending on location. Market reforms eliminated the once adequate health commune centers and forced communities to deal with their medical needs on their own. Doctors do not have private practices. Patients must go to hospitals for any treatment. Village doctors migrated to urban areas where people could afford their services in the now for-profit, fees-for-service system. Most hospitals are government owned and doctors are paid poorly some as little as 120 USD a month. If doctors want to increase their income, they dole out prescription drugs and order unnecessary procedures because the government sets the fees and they are usually well beyond what they actually cost. China spends less than 5% of its GDP on health care. Life expectancy is 72 years.


JAPAN -

The Japanese people live long healthy lives. Everyone is required to buy health insurance either through their workplace or from community-based insurance companies. The government pays for those who are too poor to afford it. Their system is not considered "socialized medicine" because most of Japan's hospitals are privately owned and doctors offices are private businesses. All citizens are covered and premiums run an average of 280 USD a month per family. Employers pick up half that cost and citizens keep that insurance even if they lose their job. The Japanese Health Ministry controls the price of health care and along with the health industry negotiates a fixed price for procedures and drugs. No citizen can be turned down despite serious illness. Hospital stays are approximately 10 USD a day but may rise to maintain a balanced budget. Japan spends approximately 8% of its GDP on health care. Life expectancy is 82.25 years.


SAUDI ARABIA -

Health care in Saudi Arabia is free to all citizens. A number of government agencies collaborate to provide services though there is increasing participation from the private sector. Health care centers throughout the Kingdom provide preventative, rehabilitative and curative health care for the population. Saudi Arabia's Ministry of Health oversees the health care budget. Hospitals use state-of-the-art technology and doctors are well-trained. The growing population is causing a more congested system therefore efforts are underway to expedite additional private sector involvement. Saudi Arabia's large reliability on foreign labor has created challenges and reforms include compulsory health insurance, better health education and medical education within the Kingdom. Saudi Arabia spends approximately 3.6% of its GDP on health care. Life expectancy is 74.11 years.


AFRICA -

TUNISIA -

In Tunisia, the health care system is divided between government run and funded clinics and hospitals and private for-profit and non-profit ones. The Ministry of Public Health closely monitors both. Health care in Tunisia is generally excellent and their private hospitals attract foreign patients for medical procedures in the fields of urology, cardiology and cosmetic surgery. The medical tourism industry is the second largest employer in the country. Over 85% of the population has access to health care. Unfortunately, there is a lack of medical facilities outside of the major cities often forcing the ill to travel a great distance for treatment. Rapid population growth has increased demand and waiting times for care, particularly in the public sector, are long. The government of Tunisia recognizes that reforms are needed and is considering charging co-payments for prescriptions and hospital stays. Tunisia spends approximately 5.5% of its GDP on health care. Life expectancy is 75.01 years.


BOTSWANA -

Botswana's health care includes both a private and public system each with their own physicians, clinics and hospitals. All citizens of Botswana receive free health care which includes hospitalization, laboratory testing, prescriptions as well as primary care. Every health region is managed by a district medical officer. In more sparsely populated areas, health posts are available for care. Botswana funds its health care system through profits from the diamond industry. The prevalence of the HIV/AIds virus in Botswana has prompted the government to give priority to health care issues and as a result it has managed to make remarkable strides. It is considered a model country in Africa. Botswana spends approximately 7.6% of its GDP on health care. Life expectancy is 58.5 years.


KENYA -

Kenya has experienced a lot of overhaul in health care since their independence from Great Britain in 1963. The Kenyan government oversees about 41% of health centers, the private sector about 44% and NGO's run 15%. While most nursing homes and maternity facilities are operated by the private sector, the government takes care of most hospitals and clinics. Poverty is high in Kenya and health care remains a challenge. The Ministry of Health is forced to work with the budget the Ministry of Finance allocates for health care. This amount often falls far short of the need. Much of the health care in Kenya is financed through donors. Though the United States is the largest bilateral donor, the United Kingdom, Germany, Japan and Denmark contribute as well mostly through the United Nations system. One very real problem is maintaining physicians particularly in the public sector. Trained health care workers tend to migrate to the higher paying private sector or leave Kenya altogether. Kenya spends approximately 4.2% of its GDP on health care. Life expectancy is 59.48 years.


Oceania -

AUSTRALIA -

All Australians have access to free or low cost health care. Through the Department of Health and Ageing, the Australian government oversees national health policies and subsidizes state and territory governments in providing health services. Their health care system, called Medicare, is funded through a taxation levy based on the individual's income. Public hospitals are jointly funded by both the state and territory governments and by the Australian government. In the private sector which accounts for about 41% of the population, safety net measures exist to make sure patients who require high-level treatment and medication in a single year do not have significant out-of-pocket expenses. Those citizens who earn over a set amount ($70,000 individuals, $140,000 couples) pay an extra 1% tax levy. Australia spends approximately 9.1 percent of its GDP on health care. Life expectancy is 81.81 years.


NEW ZEALAND -

New Zealand has one of the oldest universal health care systems in the world. Health services in New Zealand are provided by a complex network of various organizations and people. Every year the national government decides the amount of public money that will be spent on health care. They then allocate these funds to the District Health Boards. Broad guidelines are in place on what services the DHBs must provide. The DHBs then purchase health services from public, non-profit and private agencies and organizations. Citizens are responsible for choosing and paying a primary health care provider. A GP's fees range from 13-33 USD. On the other hand, specialty care is covered by the District Health Boards. Low income residents of New Zealand are subsidized for any health cost. New Zealand spends approximately 8.9% of its GDP on health care. Life expectancy is 80.59 years.


PAPUA NEW GUINEA -

Health care in Papua New Guinea is dismal at best. Infrastructure is limited in this developing country and diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS claim many lives. Over 87% of the population lives outside urban areas where poor logistical conditions prevent any type of adequate health care. There is also an overwhelming lack of human resources to serve the need. The government of Papua New Guinea is working closely with WHO and other donor partners to find solutions. Faith-based organizations are also working in conjunction with the government to help facilitate access to health care and medication. The neighboring countries of Australia and Japan support the Department of Health in the planning and coordination of health care activities. Papua New Guinea spends approximately 3.2% of its GDP on health care. Life expectancy is only 45.5 years.



Please check out my other Hubs by clicking here - http://suziecat7.hubpages.com/_36otspfnata5l/hub/Global-Incident-Map

And here - http://suziecat7.hubpages.com/_36otspfnata5l/hub/20-Awesome-Global-Websites-to-Bookmark











Do you think healthcare should be publicly funded?

See results without voting

More by this Author


Comments 79 comments

Pcunix profile image

Pcunix 4 years ago from SE MA

Prepare yourself for an onslaught of Right Wingers who will tell you that every country that provides health care is going broke and that their citizens universally hate the system and would much rather die in misery in the good old you ess of ayy.


mio cid profile image

mio cid 4 years ago from Uruguay

I see you are interested in healthcare systems around the world , you may want to learn about the healthcare system in Uruguay,South America, which could very well be the best healthcare system in the world.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

Interesting hub, Suzie!

We do have to wonder why so many wealthy people in countries where health care is 'free' and supposedly excellent, still choose to come to the US when their lives are at risk.

I submit that health care in the US was affordable, UNTIL government got involved in the 60's.


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Pcunix - Prepared. There are some admirable models out there. While some countries that have universal health care are having problems (Germany, UK), it would be wise to look at Chile's system, for example. Or the Netherlands. Thanks for reading, Pcunix.


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Mio - I think we can learn from studying other systems. I'll have to check out the health care model in Uruguay. Thanks for stopping by.


Pcunix profile image

Pcunix 4 years ago from SE MA

@WillStarr: there is no doubt that we can offer much to those who have the money to pay for it.. that doesn't change the dismal facts, though.

One of the most efficient and cost effective health care systems anywhere is Medicare.. oh, awful, awful Government!


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Hi Will - Also we should wonder why so many Americans travel to South America for medical treatment. I still believe the U.S. has much to learn from some of these other countries. Japan is a good example. Thank you for always supporting me by reading and commenting on my Hubs.


drbj profile image

drbj 4 years ago from south Florida

Thank you, susie, for this very interesting and relevant information about healthcare. I agree that the U.S. has a lot to learn from other countries regarding health insurance plans. For a start, we might investigate how Japan can offer hospital stays for around $10 (USD) per day! Hard to believe.


ib radmasters profile image

ib radmasters 4 years ago from Southern California

SuzieCat

Unfortunately, your hub doesn't really address Healthcare. It addresses government versus private handling of Healthcare.

Healthcare should really focus on the effectiveness, and viability of curing the ill, maintaining the dignity of the sick, and protecting the people from poor healthcare services.

Over the last fifty five years since the FDA was appointed by Congress to oversee the drug industry, we have not found any real cures for diseases. The last cure was prior to the FDA control, and it was the Salk Vaccine for Polio.

Today, we are donating and fighting diseases that are still unchallenged by medical science. Many of these diseases are caused by our own immune system.

The Medical Industry while not curing them has specially identified them. This means thousands of diseases have specialists to treat them, but no one to cure them.

Simple diseases like Eczema, Psoriasis, Arthritis and many others have their symptoms treated with some very expensive drugs.

Cancers are also specifically identified but none are curable. They are all treated if diagnosed correctly with the shotgun approach of years ago, with a dash a new expensive drugs. These drugs may work or not work for a time.

The reason that Cancers kill and require lifetime treatments is that medical science has focused on very lucrative long term treatments.

Many of these treatments, including the FDA approved ones, are ineffective, and may cause even more problems for the patients.

A cure would look at the systemic origin of these diseases and maybe they could find a common denominator. That common denominator if it could be fixed may cure several or even hundreds of diseases.

An immune disease may manifest itself in different parts of the body and brain, but our immune system when it is working effectively protects them both.

It is when something goes wrong in the immune system that medical science fails.

Jerry Lewis has spent sixty years fighting MD, but only marginal treatments have been found. No Cure...

The same is true for the rest of the diseases. Fortunately not all these diseases are life threatening, but even debilitating diseases suck out the quality of life.

Treatments are still archaic, including trips to the doctor, hospitals, and pharmacy. I won't go into to that one, but it involves poor quality.

The details of this poor quality would take large hubs, but the bottom line is that allowing everyone access to our healthcare system would make the quality even worse.

The Healthcare System needs to be changed, and I don't mean by ObamaCare. As long as the pecuniary interest is the big dog in the medical world, than there will not be any cures.

We need cures, not long term questionably effective treatments.

Until we have the cures, none of the rest of the world has the best healthcare. Currently, we rely on the expertise and effectiveness of our doctors. That means that even in the same system, choosing the wrong doctor can kill you.

my opinion.//


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

Being forever known as the one who discovered a cure for a deadly disease more important to a researcher than money.

I don't buy the notion that cures are hidden because of money.


ib radmasters profile image

ib radmasters 4 years ago from Southern California

WillStarr

Then maybe you could explain why they found cures before the FDA gained control, and none after that.

We have more technology, more experience and more knowledge today, so something is not working.

I submit that large corporations seek money for the shareholders as their number one goal. The medical industry is run by very large corporations.

We put a man on the moon in less than a decade with analog computers and low technology.

You didn't address your comment to me, but I felt compelled to respond to it because it lacked any details to support it.

my opinion......


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Drbj - It would be great if our government would at least study these other systems and see if they might possibly be viable. Thank you so much for reading and taking the time to comment.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

ib radmasters,

If you are accusing corporations of withholding disease cures for money, them it's up to you to either prove it with hard evidence or admit that it's just idle speculation.


JON EWALL profile image

JON EWALL 4 years ago from usa

suziecat7

''Most medical facilities are owned and operated by the private sector. Health insurance, on the other hand, is now largely provided by the government with programs such as Medicare, Veteran's Administration, Medicaid and others''

The US Government is the largest provider of healthcare in the world. They also have the largest claim denial in addition. Your hub didn't mention the 11 million illegals and the poor who are not denied health services when going to emergency hospital rooms. The government directs the private market to administer aid for everyone including non-citizens. The cost of that aid is passed on to the providers and to paying customers.

A visit to a ER Center can cost $ 1000's.

ANOTHER PART OF OBAMACARE KICKED IN ON JAN. 1,2012.TAXES on the healthcare industry will increase premiums to customers, Medicare payments to doctors will be cut again 20%.President Obama claimed that healthcare cost would be going down if the healthcare bill was approved. REALLY


American View profile image

American View 4 years ago from Plano, Texas

"One of the most efficient and cost effective health care systems anywhere is Medicare.. oh, awful, awful Government!"

This was an extremely poor statement. I can speak first hand how poor and useless that system is. During my health issues, they denied at least 80 % of treatments and procerdures. For those who think medicaid is the answer, know this. It is not a free system. Medicaid reserves the right to be reimbursed. They can attach salaries and personal assets if they find out you have them. I have paid more in health care than some will ever make in their lifetime and according to the program, I would owe tham close to $500,000.

A great article that gives more thought to our health care issues here. We all know Obamacare is a failure in the making and will need to look for alternatives voted up


ib radmasters profile image

ib radmasters 4 years ago from Southern California

Will Star

Spoken like a politician.

The facts are on my side, you are the one speculating.

BTW, I am not saying that they have a cure, I am saying that finding a long term treatment is their goal, not cures.

You have not given one reason why there have been no cures.

Will, I hope that you never need a cure because there are none. But you will still have your opinion.

Happy New Year


American View profile image

American View 4 years ago from Plano, Texas

Here is a health care idea that would work

http://hubpages.com/politics/New-Idea-for-Health-C...


American View profile image

American View 4 years ago from Plano, Texas

One more thing, cures create income/money and that is why they are rushed to market


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

"...I am saying that finding a long term treatment is their goal, not cures."

And if you have no evidence to support that claim, it's pure speculation, not a 'fact'.


Pcunix profile image

Pcunix 4 years ago from SE MA

Hey, AV: I speak first hand also. You are wrong.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

"One of the most efficient and cost effective health care systems anywhere is Medicare.. oh, awful, awful Government!"

Utter nonsense! It's a fiscal disaster:

"In 1965, as Congress considered legislation to establish a national Medicare program, the House Ways and Means Committee estimated that the hospital insurance portion of the program, Part A, would cost about $9 billion annually by 1990. Actual Part A spending in 1990 was $67 billion. The actuary who provided the original cost estimates acknowledged in 1994 that, even after conservatively discounting for the unexpectedly high inflation rates of the early ‘70s and other factors, “the actual [Part A] experience was 165% higher than the estimate.”

Medicare (entire program). In 1967, the House Ways and Means Committee predicted that the new Medicare program, launched the previous year, would cost about $12 billion in 1990. Actual Medicare spending in 1990 was $110 billion—off by nearly a factor of 10.

Medicaid DSH program. In 1987, Congress estimated that Medicaid’s disproportionate share hospital (DSH) payments—which states use to provide relief to hospitals that serve especially large numbers of Medicaid and uninsured patients—would cost less than $1 billion in 1992. The actual cost that year was a staggering $17 billion. Among other things, federal lawmakers had failed to detect loopholes in the legislation that enabled states to draw significantly more money from the federal treasury than they would otherwise have been entitled to claim under the program’s traditional 50-50 funding scheme.

Medicare home care benefit. When Congress debated changes to Medicare’s home care benefit in 1988, the projected 1993 cost of the benefit was $4 billion. The actual 1993 cost was more than twice that amount, $10 billion."

http://blog.heritage.org/2009/08/04/health-care-re...


Pcunix profile image

Pcunix 4 years ago from SE MA

Blah, blah,blah - right wing fear mongering. I can always count on you, Will. The fact are simple: it works and if we can keep the GOP away from it, it will keep on working.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

"Blah, blah,blah - right wing fear mongering. I can always count on you, Will."

Translation: If you can't dispute the facts, try ridicule and ad hominem attacks.


Pcunix profile image

Pcunix 4 years ago from SE MA

Whatever, Will. The FACT is that Medicare works. You certainly aren't denying my description of you, are you? That's what you and all your ilk are all about: fear,


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

ibradmasters - This Hub was intended to give an overview of different healthcare systems around the world. I'll leave the finding cures Hub up to you. Thanks for stopping by.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

"The FACT is that Medicare works."

Social Security, Medicare, and Unemployment Compensation account for nearly 60 cents of every federal dollar spent, and 40 cents of that is now being borrowed! It 'works' only as long as our credit holds out. After that, we will be in the same predicament as Greece.


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Thanks, American View. I'm going to check out your link.


American View profile image

American View 4 years ago from Plano, Texas

Medicare works? Then why do you compain about it? You can claim your first hand remarks all you want. Here is a challenge, If it works so well I will give you all my bills and you can get them to pay for it, and if they do not, you pay for it. In addition, you can get them to approve what needs to be done now instead of denying me medical treatments.


JON EWALL profile image

JON EWALL 4 years ago from usa

suziecat7

You report:

'' Physicians in the United States are paid double ''

The statement needs to be defined as to why!

Medicare, a US Government program, cuts payments to providers 20%, AFTER the cut, Medicare pays ONLY 80% of the approved amount, the remaining 20%of the Medicare approved amount is paid by the insurer's private supplement insurance company. The first 20% is required to be paid by the client ( co-pay),if the provider does not accept Medicare assignment.

Medicare is not free to retirees as assumed by many in the real world. SOCIAL SECURITY payments to retirees deducts approximately $99 per month from the payment to pay Medicare Insurance Premiums. NOTE that Medicare DOES NOT cover all the costs of healthcare. Retirees are required to buy a supplement insurance policy, approximate cost of $500 per month , to cover the total cost of healthcare.

The Medicare program is in the RED AND GOING BROKE! The Social Security trust fund pays out more than it takes in.

The recent 2 month approved payroll tax holiday will cost $33 billion, the money to supplement the loss of revenue to the trust fund comes from the general fund, which is borrowed money, which is increasing the size of the 2012 deficit and the national debt. Obama recently requested from

Congress another $1.2 trillion to add to the recent approval of raising the national debt

In the new Healthcare Bill, OBAMACARE, Medicare was cut $500 billion , Obama and Company don’t advertise that part of the new healthcare bill. The fact and the truth of the issue is that the cost of healthcare is going up, not down as the Obama administration promised.


ib radmasters profile image

ib radmasters 4 years ago from Southern California

Will Star

You preach facts, yet you never provide any.

My fact on long term treatments is shown by the lack of any cures in the last fifty years, while long term treatments exist in their place.

Diseases like MD, MS and many more have no cure, and no real cure in sight. Yet they have lifelong treatments.

BTW, Law firms love to sue the treatments that are FDA approved, but still result in more damage than good.

Now the lawyers are even suing Tylenol for liver blowouts.

Which means that we don't even have a safe pain killer. As Tylenol was the safest and therefore most prescribed NSAID.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

It takes only a second to prove you wrong. Just Google 'new cure', and there are all kinds:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44090512/ns/health-can...


kdawson 4 years ago from northwest Iowa

I never trust any knothead wearing a cowboy hat.


feenix profile image

feenix 4 years ago

To: ib radmaster,

You just arrived on HubPages 13 days ago and it is already quite clear that you did not come here in peace.

So, okay, all of us here get it. You have made your point. You are much smarter than any of us are. You "got game" and can kick anybody's behind who gets in yo' way. And you are "as bad as you wanna be."

So, now you can chill. We know you're here.


feenix profile image

feenix 4 years ago

kdawson, what do you think about colored people? And what kinds of names do you call them while you're sitting at your kitchen table?


feenix profile image

feenix 4 years ago

Hello, susiecat,

I apologize for my helping to disturb the peace here in your comment section. However, I just do not like bullies.

Moving on, this is a useful, awesome, interesting and very informative hub.

I retired from the life-and-insurance industry after working in that field for nearly 40 years. So, this well-written and well-researched article is of particular interest to me.


ib radmasters profile image

ib radmasters 4 years ago from Southern California

Will Star

I looked at the link that you provided, and fortunately I can read and understand what I read.

This was not a cure, it is another experiment.

Sorry Will but your argument doesn't work.

I am leaving you with your no proof politician replies.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

Right. Medicine is deliberately not finding cures. Got it.

Walk away slowly, and avoid eye contact.


feenix profile image

feenix 4 years ago

Yo, ib rad,

If I saw things as darkly as you do, I would not be living in this country. I would relocate to someplace like Cuba or North Korea.

And interestingly, all the while you are putting down the U.S.A., you are out basking in the beautiful California sun.

Furthermore, I hope that you were not born in California -- like I was -- because I would hate to have anything in common with you.


Josak profile image

Josak 4 years ago from variable

Great hub there are plenty more countries with great free healthcare, I live in Australia at the moment and get free healthcare and Aus is one of the few countries that did not go into recession during the GFC so anyone who thinks it wont work is clueless and Americo-centric we have had this for 40 years plus, certainly no one here calling for it to be taken away and everyone would laugh if you did.


kdawson 4 years ago from northwest Iowa

I commonly hear the complaint that the care you get under such systems isn't the best. Dimwits. Its better than nothing.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

"...there are plenty more countries with great free healthcare..."

Correction: No country has 'free' healthcare. Somebody, somewhere, is paying for it.


kdawson 4 years ago from northwest Iowa

Dear Fenix,

I call them by their names. What do you call them?


Josak profile image

Josak 4 years ago from variable

@WillStarr

Thats right the taxpayer pays just like he does for the roads maybe we should get rid of those as well.


feenix profile image

feenix 4 years ago

kdawson,

Now why did you have to go and call me the "A-Word?" That is not cool at all.

Because I am not a snitch, I am not going to report your behavior to the admins. However, you had better hope that they don't pick up on what you called me all on their own.

Also, you had better hope that the disgusting name that you called me is not reported to the admins by one of the other hubbers around here.


feenix profile image

feenix 4 years ago

kdawson,

You wrote, "I call them by their names. What do you call them?"

I'll tell you one thing. I do not ever refer to colored people as "them."


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

John Ewall - Thank you for your interesting comments. As to doctors being paid so much more in the U.S as in other countries, it is a problem. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/08/us/08docs.html?_...


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Now what do I do with the rest of these comments? I have denied a couple of kdawson's comments. Sorry about all that, Feenix. Thanks for reading my Hub.


kdawson 4 years ago from northwest Iowa

Mr. Feenix,

Point 1. I never call colored people "them."

Now that's just silly. I don't normally use the term 'colored people.' As I said I call them by their names.

Point 2. If you're going to pick a fight, expect a comeback.

Point 3. You said at one point you don't like bullies. Then I advise you to avoid mirrors. Like every bully I've ever met as soon as someone stands up to you you get your knickers in a twist and cry for mommy.

Point 4. As to your veiled threats, this certainly isn't the only game in town. My boots aren't shivering yet.

Point 5. Now go have a nice pout.


feenix profile image

feenix 4 years ago

kdawson,

You have been on HubPages five months, published 55 hubs and have only nine followers.

Therefore, when it comes getting into an exchange with you, that is totally unnecessary for me to do.

The only thing I have to do is sit back, chill and let the facts about you do the talking for me.

P.S. I'm a colored person. The Lord colored me with an eye-pleasing shade of tan.


feenix profile image

feenix 4 years ago

Hello, Suzie,

No, it is I who owe you an apology.

I apologize for the fact that I have not restrained myself from childishly responding to certain individuals who have left comments here.


JON EWALL profile image

JON EWALL 4 years ago from usa

suziecat7

Allow me to comment on the link article.

The report is flawed and is incomplete regarding the reasons for higher doctor fees in the US.

‘’ “High physician fees in the United States may reflect the cost of attracting skilled candidates to medicine in a society with a relatively more skewed income distribution,” the study said. ‘’ ‘’Doctors are paid higher fees in the United States than in several other countries, and this is a major factor in the nation’s higher overall cost of health care, ‘’

‘’Doctors have generally been excluded from recent cost-cutting proposals because under existing law, Medicare,[ see my reply above ]

the federal insurance program for older people, will reduce their fees by 29.5 percent on Jan. 1.’’ “and fees paid by private insurers in the United States for this service are double the fees paid in the private sector elsewhere.”

TWO IMPORTANT FACTORS not mentioned in the report that tend to raise the cost of healthcare in the US are the HIGH cost of medical liability insurance to the providers and the ability to choose insurance providers across state lines ( competitive pricing). Tort reform and insurance provider competition in the country was not included in the Obama health care law. The government’s actions forcing the insurance providers to provide care to non- paying citizens increases the cost to paying citizens. Government regulations of providing care in the US was not covered in the report as should have in comparing healthcare cost. Taxes imposed by the government on suppliers will be passed on to clients further increasing the cost to citizens.

PRESENTLY insurance pools has been vastly reduced due to unemployment ( 14 million out of work ) hence the higher cost to the insurance companies providing insurance.

I have written a few articles on the hub regarding the new healthcare bill that one may find interesting. Jon-Ewall


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Jon - Thanks for your detailed comment. I will check out your Hub.


JON EWALL profile image

JON EWALL 4 years ago from usa

suziecat7

You are welcome. If I can add to your hub in any way I'LL be happy to do so.

Have a good day!


prasetio30 profile image

prasetio30 4 years ago from malang-indonesia

This was great information. Personally, I really care about health. Thanks for writing about healthcare around the world. I learn many things from you. Well done and rated up!

Prasetio


JON EWALL profile image

JON EWALL 4 years ago from usa

suziecat7

President Obama did not mention healthcare in the state of the union speech on Jan.24,2012.The theme for his re-election is '' fairness'' and ''tax the rich''.Cutting $500 billion out of Medicare is a fact that one should be aware of, only because the co-pay costs for seniors will go up.


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Thanks, Pras.


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Jon EWall - There's always so much the average American is not made aware of. What a mess.


JON EWALL profile image

JON EWALL 4 years ago from usa

suziecat7

1/29/12

The US Department of Health and Human Services announced last week that all employers, including Catholic employers, will be forced to offer their employees health coverage that includes sterilization, abortion-inducing drugs and contraception. ALL health insurers will be forced to include those ‘’ services ‘’in insurance policies that they write. All individuals will be forced to buy that coverage as a part of their health insurance plans. President Obama Said that GOVERNMENT PAID abortion is not in the healthcare bill. With the latest revelation, he may be right, the taxpayers will be paying in higher premiums against their will.

Leader Pelosi apparently was right when she said ‘’ we need to pass the bill, so that we will know what’s in it ‘’.Shameful as it sounds, the Democrat leadership continues to hide what’s in Obamacare for our citizens.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

"The US Department of Health and Human Services announced last week that all employers, including Catholic employers, will be forced to offer their employees health coverage that includes sterilization, abortion-inducing drugs and contraception."

Catholic Bishops all around the nation are planning to defy Obama on this.


Derdriu 4 years ago

SuzieCat7, What an elucidating, intelligent, thoughtful comparison of select health care systems throughout the world! You do a great job of making it easy for readers to come to their own conclusions and to understand your summaries. You begin and end with the same important comparative criteria which you maintain throughout: coverage, eligibility, financing, and impact. There are a number of countries which showcase particularly well, such as Canada and Iceland, and others which now can be identified as potential beneficiaries of change. Additionally, it's great to have the comparative life expectancies at the end of the analysis of each country.

Thank you for sharing, voted up + all,

Derdriu


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Thanks, Derdrui.


mio cid profile image

mio cid 4 years ago from Uruguay

The tiny country of Uruguay in South America provides universal care to all persons in the country regardless of whether they are citizens,residents, or tourists. It is funded through :the private enterprise, the workers that make a monthly payment according to their income, and the government,.Mind you healthcare is provided by both private and public healthcare institutions and you are free to choose whichever institution you prefer,and the quality of it is one of the most advanced and comprehensive in the world. QUALITY HEALTHCARE

If health care is a concern for you, you can be assured that Uruguay has good quality health care, both public and private, throughout the country. This aspect of life in Uruguay often factors high in the positives list for expats who chose to move to the country.

The public healthcare service is available to all its residents and provides free public hospital service throughout the country. A free emergency ambulance service is available under the system, and initial treatment and medication is free of charge, however, ongoing treatment will incur a fee, which is calculated depending on the level of treatment required.

While the public health care system is said to operate to a good standard, many expats opt to pay for a medical coverage scheme at one of the many high-standard private hospitals. These types of schemes are offered as an alternative to traditional medical insurance, and, depending on the hospital and level of coverage offered, typically cover treatment and medication within that hospital, and often visits to pre-appointed GPs outside of the hospital.

Hospital Britanico, beside the Tres Cruces bus terminal just outside the Montevideo's city center is the best hospital in the country, and is regarded very highly by international standards. The doctors here are English-speaking and well trained.


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Thanks, Mio Cid. Sounds like Uruguay's got it together.


JON EWALL profile image

JON EWALL 4 years ago from usa

mio cid

Sounds good, looks good, one should think about it!


American View profile image

American View 4 years ago from Plano, Texas

As a resident, you are eligible to participate in the national health care system (which includes a network of free clinics), as well as higher-end private hospital associations.

Uruguay’s public health care system: In the public system the free clinics can be slow and crowded. However, if you have no health insurance and can’t afford to buy it in Uruguay, then these clinics will be a welcome option.

The Ministry of Public Health runs the public health care system in Uruguay through the State Health Services Administration (ASSE) and other related agencies (such as the Armed Forces, Police, etc). The ASSE serves 33.7% of Uruguay’s population The private health care system is made up of mainly private, non-profit health care institutions, also known as Mutualistas or Cooperativas.

There are about 48 of these Mutualistas/ Cooperativas providing health care in Uruguay to nearly half (46.6%) of the population through private health insurance plans.

This system does not cover everyone either. I would be most interested to see the coverage they have even in the clinics. Are they dollar driven like here in the US and not give certain healthcare because it is too expensive?


Wayne Brown profile image

Wayne Brown 4 years ago from Texas

The primary problem with healthcare in its present state in the USA is litigation and the costs that it drives. Regardless of how we re-design our system, unless litigation is addressed in an effective manner, costs will still be through the roof. 16% of our GDP in medical spending in the USA...no other population spends so much money in that area. Of course, in America, one answer fits all. If it does not work as expected, throw taxpayer money at it. The USA will see, as Canada has, the decline of qualified and skilled doctors and specialists in a government-run system. Healthcare is a necessary thing and people certainly need options but allowing the government to run it is certainly miles from the best choice. At least the lawyers are still happy in America. WB


2patricias profile image

2patricias 4 years ago from Sussex by the Sea

This is a very interesting Hub, which I have voted up.

I live in the UK - as does the other Patricia. When Obama was first elected, my cousin in the USA asked me several questions about the health care system here. As I worked my way through the questions he asked, I began to realise that the starting position in the USA was so different, that it was hard to make comparisons.

The National Health Service is far from perfect, and because it is so complex it is hard to make changes. That said, my family has experienced good care from the NHS.

I think one of the best features about the NHS is that there is no fear of not being able to afford medical treatment. Also, the health service user does not (usually) have to complete much paperwork.

Several years ago my son had surgery (and a hospital stay) in France. We were very impressed at the high standard of care, but at that time France was spending more money on health care.

I don't pretend to know the answers about how to make healthcare more affordable, more open to all, etec. However, I do know that this is a good hub.


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Thank you all so much. There are no easy answers.


SonQuioey10 profile image

SonQuioey10 4 years ago from Williamston NC

Very informative. Our system here in the United States is all over the place, private and public. Fraudulent and non-fraudulent. Regulations among other things, like rights, with the upcoming healthcare mandate should be interesting.


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

SonQ - It should be interesting indeed. Something needs to be done but I'm not sure what. Thanks for reading.


Sheri Faye profile image

Sheri Faye 3 years ago from Chemainus. BC, Canada

Hey suziecat7 you have stirred up a hornets nest here! This hub was very well researched and written. I have learned alot...mostly I have learned (again) how very grateful I am to be Canadian! I have hardwroking American friends whoes finances have been tototally wiped out due to health issues. I (and most Canadians) are a amazed at the lack of health care for so many in the states. I mentioned this is a forum the other day...we have a problem here in that desperate ill Americans are coming to Canada and stealing our health care cards to get the treatment here they need. Anyway....good job!


UberGeekGirl profile image

UberGeekGirl 3 years ago from Calgary

In the states, your typical poor/poverty level family can get state medical if they have children. Senior citizens can get medicaid. But if you're above poverty level, unemployed, and have no young children at home you're completely screwed on medical costs.

Take me for example. Last June I shattered my ankle and broke my leg. Because of how the damage was done I had to stay in hospital for a month and physical rehab another nearly 2 months. My cost? $0.00 here in Canada. Same care in the US? Would have cost me 6 figures out of pocket. (I know because when my youngest son required neurosurgery and 1 week in hospital back in the US in 1999 it cost over 250,000 dollars.


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 3 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Sheri and UberGeek - You are both so right. The U.S healthcare system is a mess. I'm not sure Obamacare is the answer either. We'll see. Thanks so much for stopping by.


HSchneider 3 years ago from Parsippany, New Jersey

Great comparison of the different levels of healthcare protection around the world, Suziecat7. I am hoping our new healthcare law will be a big step forward for us to fairer healthcare delivery for us. It is only a first step though. Excellent Hub.


B. Leekley profile image

B. Leekley 3 years ago from Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA

Thanks for this brief overview of health care systems. My Canadian friends love theirs.


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 3 years ago from Asheville, NC Author

Thanks, HSchneider.

B. Leekley - I'll bet they do. Thanks for stopping by.


JON EWALL profile image

JON EWALL 3 years ago from usa

suziecat7

Another look at healthcare.http://hubpages.com/politics/GOVERNMENTHEALTREFORM... …Insurers warn of overhaul-induced sticker shock

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/insurers-warn-overh

Partial list of taxes and fees in health overhaul

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/partial-list-taxes-...

obamacare

Insurers warn of overhaul-induced sticker shock

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/insurers-warn-overh...

How Will the New Health Law Affect Your Premiums?

http://blogs.wsj.com/corporate-intelligence/2013/0...

March 23, 2010 President Barack Obama is applauded after signing the health care bill

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/04/09/study-c...

OBAMACARE,the law is still being written even after is was passed by Congress, REALLY


Ruth 3 years ago

I wanted to crteae you the little note to finally give many thanks over again relating to the stunning opinions you have discussed here. It was incredibly open-handed with you to deliver publicly precisely what a few individuals could possibly have distributed as an ebook to end up making some bucks on their own, most importantly since you could have done it if you ever wanted. Those smart ideas additionally served to provide a fantastic way to be certain that other people have a similar fervor just as mine to see more and more with regards to this condition. I am certain there are numerous more pleasant situations ahead for individuals who find out your site.


JON EWALL profile image

JON EWALL 3 years ago from usa

Ruth

Thank you for the compliment. I can offer you an invitation to visit my web site, much more STUFF of interest hopefully all can enjoy.Check my profile.

have a great day

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working