How Our Subconscious Battle with Hatred & Racism is Won

Source

I previously wrote the article/blog: Why Black People Don’t Hate White People, and in the end agreed to further define it, as in summarizing that article, I stated the following:

…In summarizing why the majority of black people don’t hate white people, would ultimately lead to another article, which I will write when time and conscious permit, but it can be defined best by Sun Tzu’s quote from The Art of War, “If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

That is merely to suggest, that hatred of someone can be combatted with understanding, and that is on both sides of the coin. It may not be entirely forgiven, but once someone has an understanding of what makes them tick or react the way they do, they can then begin to empathize with them, or be able to mitigate their negative reactions to resolve the issues. Understanding is half the battle. What do we tend to understand about why we were subjected to over 300 years of racism and brutality? The history books tell us that the Native Americans and Indians were first subjected to servitude, but didn’t hack it, so when they saw the strong and able bodied African, we were deemed the bodies that could help manufacture and cultivate American goods and be of service to the numerous plantations and households across America. However, when we look closer and deeper, and fast forward to now, it was and is a matter of survival for those who condemn us. There can only be one king of the beasts in the jungle. When one builds a society, the idea of a hierarchy, as is exhibited in nature, with the most aggressive carnivore at the top of the food chain, and the docile, herbivores at the bottom, would there be any other explanation? For the endless pursuits of psychological, emotional, mental, spiritual and physical manipulation, if I can call it that, to keep the herbivores, metaphorically speaking, in their place, while the aggressive carnivore stays on top, as the king of beasts, we begin to understand or “know the enemy”, but sadly, as a part of the rule of this king of beasts, to compliment the psychological warfare, he ensures that we do not know ourselves -to include our history, our origins, and the like. Understanding and knowing his war strategy and agenda, however, helps us to get to know ourselves better, to go in search of the truth, to understand our origins.

To dig deeper, to ask the question why he must rule this way in order to survive and to remain king of the beasts, we discover his greatest vulnerabilities, -and that is not his frailty or lack of masculinity in the great prowess of our black diaspora, because when it comes to the Homo Sapien king of beasts, ones’ mental capacities are far more prominent than ones’ physical capacities, as to devise such an elaborate and vile plan, that subverts or goes against the very humanitarian and moral compass of man. To that we discover that the deep-seated, dark secret and weakness of the king of beasts, is his very humanity, for ironically, the very thing that he supposedly despises so much in other races, especially our own, is what we have the most of, that could lead to the total obliteration, of his race, and that is our abundance of melanin…

Any time the king of the beasts of humanity procreates outside of his race, his children may no longer look like him… his generations could be wiped out. The objective to preserve a whole race is a great vulnerability… Who wants to be extinct after all, so to get rid of or weaken the newly devised anomaly that has the power to blacken the bloodline would only make sense…

Black people are slowly awakening to the truth of who they are, as in the words of the Egyptians, our very people, “Man, Know Thyself,” was one of the chief religious concepts. Thus Sun Tzu’s quote, “If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles…” ruminates with us, and we “need not fear,” which is heavily rooted in hatred, -anyone upon understanding them…

Quotes Gram. (n.d.). Sun Tzu Quotes. (Infographic). Retrieved August 3, 2016 from http://quotesgram.com/sun-tzu-quotes/

More by this Author


Comments

No comments yet.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working