If America Had Remained British: A Timeline - 1800 to 1825

1801: Admiral Bonaparte sails to the Caribbean to retake Barbados, Curacao and Trinidad, recently invaded by the Spanish. In the bloody Battle Of Grenada, Napoleon manages to sink much of the Spanish Armada. Spanish forces mass in the Sonoran Desert, readying an invasion force across American Texas to take the eastern flank of the Rocky Mountains and cut the United States in two.

1802: United States Viceroy Thomas Jefferson and his Indian peer Henry Addington meet in London with the Prime Minister and the Queen to discuss the Spanish Issue. A plan is settled upon: The Spanish are to be granted Australia and are offered a lasting armistice based on the retention of current boundaries. If they fail do agree, then the feared Bonaparte will march on Madrid and decapitate the Spanish monarchy. Carlos IV rejects the proposal, but he is overthrown by his own generals, who establish a temporary military dictatorship. The British plan is agreed to, and Australia becomes Tierra Roja after the predominant color of its interior. This treaty permanently splits the Franco-Spanish alliance.

1805: French Admiral Pierre-Charles Villeneuve is defeated by Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Trafalgar. In the punitive Treaty of Nouvelle Orleans, the French are stripped of their few remaining enclaves in the Americas, and most of the nation's Mediterranean shore to the British State Of Corsica & Sardinia. Although widely criticized for imposing overwhelming sanctions against a much diminished France, this treaty manages to launch the era of the Pax Britannica.

1812: A few thousand Americans of French Heritage living in Montreal establish the separatist breakaway country of Nouvelle Canada along the St. Lawrence River and the north shore of Lake Ontario. Viceroy James Madison orders his Generals William Hull and Isaac Brock to move on the Long Frontier and take back that American territory. Hull and Brock manage to end the rebellion and the Federation agrees to let the rebels freely move to France.

1815: Returning from seizing St. Petersburg from the Russians, First Emissary Napoleon Bonaparte is sent to quash a minor rebellion in the Netherlands. He is severely wounded and incapacitated in the Battle of Waterloo.

1820: George IV becomes King once his father finally dies after over four decades of effective incapacitation. His first royal act is to order Prime Minister Lord Liverpool to begin negotiations with Simon Bolivar on the foundation of Gran Colombia, a union of most of the former Spanish colonies in the northern half of South America, as a Protectorate Of The British Crown.

1821: First Emissary Of The British Crown Napoleon Bonaparte dies in a palatial mansion on Saint Helena donated to him by the British Crown for a lifetime of service to the Imperial Federation. He is buried at Westminster Abbey in the Crypt Of Heroes near King George III. The funeral lasts a week as millions of British citizens line up around the clock to pay their respects to the great man.

1825: At the Congress Of Upper Peru, Gran Colombia is granted full membership in the British Imperial Federation, and Bolivar is sworn in as Viceroy by another new Viceroy, the American John Quincy Adams.

Continued in
If America Had Remained British: A Timeline - 1825 to 1850

Read The Entire Timeline From 1773 to Today

If America Had Remained British: A Timeline - 1773 to 1785
If America Had Remained British: A Timeline - 1785 to 1800
If America Had Remained British: A Timeline - 1800 to 1825
If America Had Remained British: A Timeline - 1825 to 1850
If America Had Remained British: A Timeline - 1850 to 1880
If America Had Remained British: A Timeline - 1880 to 1890
If America Had Remained British: A Timeline - 1890 to 1920
If America Had Remained British: A Timeline - 1920 to 1950
If America Had Remained British: A Timeline - 1950 to 1975
If America Had Remained British: A Timeline - 1975 to Today

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