Invasive Species In The Southeastern US: Four Elegant Invaders

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What is an Invasive Species?

Invasive species: a living organism not native to an area, but rather introduced artificially either by plan or accident; sometimes called exotic pest plant and animal species.



In April, I can't help but just love the sight of Wisteria at the edge of the woods and fields. Purple clusters hang elegantly from twisting vines and the blossoms smell divine. But as the saying goes, "beauty is only skin deep." Or in this case, only bark deep. You see, this graceful, aromatic vine is what is known as an invasive species.

An invasive species is any member of the plant or animal kingdom that invades an area it is not indigenous to. And although they may look quite elegant or serve the purpose of erosion control like Kudzu, they are still right up there on the invasive species least wanted list.


Why is an Invasive Species a Problem?

But be mindful, not all invasive species are problematic; for example, dandelions. Dandelions are nice little weeds that generally mind their own business and don't take over an area. They are good for attracting pollinators to the garden, are edible and have several health benefits.

When an invasive species escapes cultivation and runs rampant through the countryside, it becomes an exotic pest. Spreading quickly, it competes aggressively with native species. The native wildlife may not have had a chance to evolve defenses against these invaders. They prey on the native species, out-competing them for food and needed nutrients. This can happen in the animal kingdom as well as the plant kingdom.

Today, we know that biodiversity is threatened by some invasive species. About 42 percent of endangered species are at risk because of an invasive species. Still, some invasive ornamental plants are sold commercially. Getting them under control can take years of expensive herbicidal applications and extensive pulling, mowing and mulching.


How Are Invasive Species Introduced Into a Region?

Species in the United States considered invasive have their roots in the colonial days. Colonists, unaware of the notion of invasive species brought many of their favorite specimens of flora and fauna with them to the new colonies. Although they were useful, many have become problematic over time. They were also carriers of some diseases and insects. Some of the species the early colonists brought over include Queen Anne's lace, dandelions, horses, cows and domestic pigs in New England.

Sometimes an invasive species has been brought over for a specific reason. This is called intentional introductions. They may have been intended for biocontrol and released into the wild where they caused unexpected problems. Some animal species may have been intended to be pets and escaped into the wild.

Other incidences of evasive species are unintentional introductions. Mail ordering items over the internet is the newest way for an invasive species to enter an area. Ships can carry aquatic organisms in the ballast water. The dreaded woolly adelgid, an insect that is destroying the eastern hemlock got to the United States by ship transport. Trucks and trains can transport organisms over land on the same continent. The pet trade industry may be responsible for introducing an invasive animal. Snakes and other exotic pets may get dumped by owners because they outgrew their tanks or cages. As far as plants go, the nursery trade industry may be responsible, as is the case with Kudzu.




What Other Places on Earth Have Invasive Species?

The answer is everywhere. In the United States, invasive species have spread through all the woodlands, desserts and wetlands. Places that are transportation hubs tend to be the hardest hit. Around the globe, birds, herbs, trees, grass, shrubs, insects and mammals find their way into new territory. The extent to which they become problematic depend on several factors or traits that the plants may have.

What can you do to help control an invasive species?

First, make yourself familiar with what species are considered invasive in your area. Google or check with your local agricultural extension agency. You may choose to try and use chemical (herbicides), physical removal (pulling, uprooting) or a combination of both. Grants may be available to help you eradicate your property of an invasive species. When traveling, clean all recreational equipment thoroughly. If driving from one part of a continent to another, don't transport fruits, vegetables, nursery plants, flowers, limbs, leaves. Don't purchase any ornament invasive species.

Traits of Invasive Species

An invasive species will have one or more of these characteristics:

  • reproduces rapidly and at a high rate
  • disperses seeds prolifically
  • can colonize areas after they have been disturbed
  • great genetic variability
  • live long lives
  • closely associated to humans
  • single parent reproduction
  • vegetation or cloning reproduction
  • abundant in its native land
  • has a broad diet

Wisteria

Wisteria is a member of the pea family. The small purple blooms that hang in clusters are shaped like pea plant blossoms. It is popular as an ornamental plant in its native China and Japan because of its pretty purple blossoms and lovely smell. Wisteria is not invasive everywhere, but it is rampant in the Southeastern United States where it has the ability to take over and choke out native plants. You can find it most anywhere in the early spring including parks, empty lots and at the edges of the fields and woods.

In the southeastern US, Wisteria is an invasive species.
In the southeastern US, Wisteria is an invasive species. | Source

Scotch Broom

Scotch Broom is also a member of the pea family, except it is a shrub where Wisteria is a vine. It has the same shaped petals as the Wisteria. It is native to Europe. They are a brilliant, bold yellow. It grows in dry, open meadows and along roadsides. The stems and tiny leaves of the Scotch Broom plant are evergreen. I'll have to admit, it is an elegant looking plant, and I have used the stems as filler in holiday floral arrangements. However, it is highly invasive and is said to negatively effect wildlife in the Southeastern US. It blooms at the same time as Wisteria. It is mildly toxic to horses and similar animals. It has been used as an herb for medicinal purposes.

Scotch Broom is Wisteria's golden relative. It too is an invasive species in the Southeastern US.
Scotch Broom is Wisteria's golden relative. It too is an invasive species in the Southeastern US. | Source

Nandina

With its pretty pink leaves in spring that turn green and stay green all winter, the Nandina bush became popular in landscaping during the 1950s and 1960s. It has white blossoms in spring that turn into showy red berries from autumn through winter. An elegant-looking shrub, Nandina is native to Eastern Asia. But in the United States, it has hit the most unwanted list in North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Florida. The problem is shoots that travel underground, causing growth to become out of control.

Pink leaves in spring that turn into evergreen leaves and bright, red berries in the fall caused this now-invasive shrub to become popular in landscaping in the middle of the 20th century.
Pink leaves in spring that turn into evergreen leaves and bright, red berries in the fall caused this now-invasive shrub to become popular in landscaping in the middle of the 20th century. | Source

Kudzu

Kudzu was introduced into the United States by Japan in 1876 at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. In China, it is one of 50 essential herbs for medicinal purposes. It has been shown to be useful in the treatment of migraine and cluster head aches, allergies and diarrhea. Kudzu has proven useful over the years for preventing soil erosion in the hilly parts of the southeast where it grows prolifically. It is an interference competitor because it blocks out light to other vegetation. It is edible, but not recommended for consumption because of herbicides. It has been used for forage for grazing animals. Kudzu reproduces by vegetation reproduction and occasionally by seeds. Seeds can take years to germinate, causing some to think it has been eradicated only to reappear.

Kudzu has been traditionally used in hilly areas to help with soil erosion.
Kudzu has been traditionally used in hilly areas to help with soil erosion. | Source

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Comments 91 comments

FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

Aww, but wisteria especially is so beautiful. I had no idea it was an invasive species! I certainly do know about kudzu, however, having grown up in the South.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

I know! Wisteria is one of my favorites. It's just too bad!


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Wow, I always thought of wisteria as so beautiful too, just as Flourish does, and I had no idea it is invasive. But sure enough, I live in southeastern United States. My neighbor across the street has some growing towards the back of her yard near the road. And last year I did notice that it had grown way up into the trees. Yes, we have Kudzu taking over everywhere, and I especially notice it all along the Interstate on my commute into the city where I work.

Thanks for the eye-opener here.

Up and more, tweeting and pinning


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

I can just see that wisteria creeping in your neighbor's yard. And Kudzu! Boy, it's everywhere. I appreciate you stopping by and sharing this, Faith Reaper!


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 2 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

What a great Hub and I have always loved Wisteria, but had no idea it was considered an invasive species. It is just so lovely hanging from a tree. All of the plants are interesting and of course I am "well-acquainted" with Kudzu. :( Sharing. Theresa


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

HA HA! I know you are. Atlanta must be the "Kudzu capital of the world." Thanks for stopping by!


Cyndi10 profile image

Cyndi10 2 years ago from Georgia

Hi, great hub. I didn't realize nandina is also an invasive plant. Nurseries sell them like crazy and the landscapers seem to love them. I see bamboo popping up in some gardens and used around property borders. Could it also be considered as invasive or does it not proliferate fast enough to be considered invasive? I understand that it is very difficult to get rid of once it has been planted.

Good research. Thanks for the information. Sharing and pinned for anyone that even thinks about planting that lovely wisteria.


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 2 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

rebecca - I think it is the kudzu capital! I live just north of Atlanta in southeast Cobb and on my drive to and from Reinhardt University (Waleska, north of Canton) every day I see more kudzu that any state or region should have. As subdivisions give way to individual and widely separated homes, the fields and hills and ditches of kudzu proliferate. In some areas it has grown over small bushes and trees; it grows up telephone poles; it even grows up along the guide wires that keep the telephone poles steady. The stuff is nothing if not tenacious. Oh, my!


DDE profile image

DDE 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

Interesting, informative and so well put together I had no idea of this you have a useful hub very much of a learning lesson to me I enjoy reading your hubs.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

I'm not sure about bamboo, but I'll bet it is invasive. When doing research, I noticed that nandina is related to bamboo. Nandina has just recently been put on the list...I heard about it on talk radio, and that is what prompted this hub. Thanks for stopping by, Cyndi!


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

It harbors fleas, too!


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

I am glad you liked it. Thanks, DDE!


Melovy profile image

Melovy 2 years ago from UK

You had me on the word “elegant!” I had to come take a look. And those plants - or your photos of them - are indeed elegant.

In the UK we definitely have invasive species too, and not just plants - grey squirrels have taken over so much of the native red squirrels’ habitat that the latter are confined to the Scottish Highlands and I think a couple of islands off the south of England.

Very interesting hub. You even got me out of hub-retirement to read it!


purl3agony profile image

purl3agony 2 years ago from USA

We have a vine that grows all over the wooded area in our yard. I always thought it was kudzu, but our vine doesn't look like your photos and it doesn't flower. Guess I need to do some more research to find out what this plant is that's invading our yard. Great hub! I love your photos!! Voted up!


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

I wish Wisteria would invade my garden!! :) They are such beautiful flowers. Great hub, we need to be aware of how much damage can be done by invading species of plants. In the UK, Japanese knotweed is causing a lot of problem, almost impossible to get rid of the plant.

Excellent work.


shanmarie profile image

shanmarie 2 years ago from Texas

Oh my goodness, how that stuff takes over! It grew in the pine trees across from where I used to live in SE TX and strangled them. It also spread so fast through the grass, but thankfully not as fast as the bamboo and kudzu that was a constant battle to keep away. At least wisteria can be cultivated into a sort of tree if one has the time and patience. It was a lovely sight to see the purple against the green of the trees.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

That kudzu is something! Thanks for stopping by!


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Ha. ha. I know. I love it, even though it is invasive. But it is not invasive everywhere.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

It might be kudzu. That flower was actually rare. You hardly ever see them. thanks for stopping by!


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Interesting! Our squirrels are gray. We don't have any red ones. I guess they jumped ship. LOL. Thanks for the nice compliment!


Sherry Hewins profile image

Sherry Hewins 2 years ago from Sierra Foothills, CA

I don't know if it's just me, but I'm not seeing your Scotch Broom photo. It's pretty with it's yellow flowers, but there is an all-out war against it in these parts.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Hmmm. I haven't had anyone else say they didn't see it. I am glad it is trying to be eradicated....pretty as it is. Thanks!


CMHypno profile image

CMHypno 2 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

We also have a problem with invasive plants here in the UK. Japanese Knotweed is so pervasive and damaging that if there is any found on or even near your property it can drag down the value. It has to be professionally removed, which can cost thousands of pounds.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Oh My! Thanks for an interesting comment!


ahorseback profile image

ahorseback 2 years ago

Okay , I'm going out on a limb here , invasive species are as or more beautiful than many "natural " species , But then , hey ! I see beauty in the weeds at the edge of the cow pastures , "cow-vetch " ? So many weeds are as beautiful as any flower ! Wisteria ! One of my favorite southern flowers ! In the purety of the northern woods we have the rare trillium ! What a beauty !.....perfect hub !.....Ed


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM

Wonderful hub! I love Wisteria and Queen Ann's Lace. I didn't know they were considered invasive. This is interesting and informative and I learned a lot about invasive plants and flowers. Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

I will look up that rare trillium. Can't wait to see it. Thanks!


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

I like Queen Anne's lace too! I don't think it is a real big problem. Thanks for stopping by.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 2 years ago from California

Well I was surprised that both Wisteria and Scotch Broom are members of the pea family!


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada.

Wonderful hub, Rebecca. Wisteria is so lovely and quite popular in California and Nevada. Growing on an arbor, or trailing around patio posts to hang all around the patio is a favorite way to show them off. I did not know these were included in the pea family, or invasive plant species. You photos are so pretty.


Venkatachari M profile image

Venkatachari M 2 years ago from Hyderabad, India

Very interesting to know. All these species are so lovely and beautiful that we can't imagine them to be invasive and problematic.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Thanks, all. Yes Audrey. The blooms of the sweet pea, scotch broom and wisteria are all similar. Phyllis, it may not be invasive out there.


MizBejabbers profile image

MizBejabbers 2 years ago

That breaks my heart about wisteria. I love it and have been wanting some. My neighbor planted one about 10 years ago and has been training it into a tree by bindng the vines as they grow. My grandma would never believe that Nandina is an invasive species.

On another note, several years ago we bought one little water hyacinth plant and put it into our small frog pond in our atrium. The pond was full of water hyacinths by the end of summer, so we brought them into the house for the winter. We did this for years. Then they were declared an invasive species and it is now illegal to sell them. We treasured our stash of water hyacinths and kept them confined and under control. They are a very good water filter and kept the water in the pond pure for the frogs, toads and little fish. Last fall we brought most of them in as usual, but our new cat ate all of them, little by little. I was confined with a broken leg and couldn’t make sure they were put safely out of reach, and Mr. B didn’t make sure they were safe. Now we are both very sad about them because we can’t get anymore. Good hub. Voted up++


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

I know how you feel! I too, love wisteria, and we had Nandina all around the house when I was growing up. Hard to believe! Thanks for stopping by!


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 2 years ago from North Carolina

Fine article and topic,Rebecca. When kudzu first showed up around these parts back in the 70s it was unreal. Trying to control it was like running up against a brick wall over and over. Don't see it too much anymore thank goodness. I'll keep an eye out now for that Nandina.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Thanks, Alstar. Good to see you again, friend.


rajan jolly profile image

rajan jolly 2 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

Rebecca what immediately strikes about these invasive species is the abundant and lush growth, factors that make it possible for them to spread very fast. The blooms are very striking and elegant to look at.

Very informative. Voted up.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

You are exactly right, Rajan. Thanks for stopping by!


Genna East profile image

Genna East 2 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

I had no idea such beautiful vines and shrubs could invade a territory with such determination. And Wisteria is a member of the pea family...who knew? This is a very informative hub…and very well written. Voted up and sharing.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Thanks, Genna!


Kathleen Cochran profile image

Kathleen Cochran 2 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

In the South we have a common warning: You know how you plant kudzu? Throw it and run!!!


Fiddleman profile image

Fiddleman 2 years ago from Zirconia, North Carolina

Nice article, the Wisteria is pretty but like kudzu can overtake more desirable areas.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Ha Ha! I love it!


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

I know. It IS so pretty, though. Thanks for stopping by!


bethperry profile image

bethperry 2 years ago from Tennesee

Very interesting. I love the Wisteria.

In my area, the Kudzu was first used to cover road construction as far back as WWII. Since then it has destroyed major areas of native vegetation. It may be attractive to some, but it sure is a nuisance to control, and cattle get sickened by it :(


cclitgirl profile image

cclitgirl 2 years ago from Western NC

Ah, yes, living in the SE part of the US - you see all of these. Awesome write up and informative. I've heard people tackling the kudzu problem by making jelly with it, haha.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Yep, it's edible. But I don't think I care for any. Thanks for stopping by!


ologsinquito profile image

ologsinquito 2 years ago from USA

I've also heard about the kudzu and how hard it is to control it. However, at the same time, these invaders seem to have medicinal properties as well.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

You are right! Thanks for stopping by.


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 2 years ago from South Africa

Wisteria is also an invasive specie in my region. Just can't get rid of its roots in my garden! Nandina and the Scotch Broom, however, are manageable. Keep to indigenous plants, is but the best rule to follow :)

Excellent hub!


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Wow! I can't believe we have the same invasive species! Very interesting.


midget38 profile image

midget38 2 years ago from Singapore

Wow. The invasive species here in Singapore would be Morning Glory. Absolutely wonderful info and shared!


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Thanks. Oh, I love morning glory. It may be invasive here, I'll check.


Act 3 profile image

Act 3 2 years ago from Athens, GA

Good hub! Thanks for helping to educate folks about invasives. There is an American wisteria that is much less aggressive. It blooms after the leaves come out instead of before. It's hard to find in the nursery trade, but a web search would probably bring it up. By the way, most bamboos are invasive.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

That's good news. Thanks!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

This is useful and important information, Rebecca. Thank you very much for publicizing the potential problems caused by invasive species. It's easy to forget these problems when an invasive plant is beautiful, but it's important that we don't!


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

We have a lot of Wisteria over here on the houses, it seems to overtake the whole house right up to the roof! lol! Great information, and not something I really thought about before, voted up and shared! nell


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Thanks, Nell Rose!


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 2 years ago from The Beautiful South

Don't know how I missed this; but glad I came across it! I love wisteria and kudzu; and have always wondered if someone couldn't get rich with kudzu since so many want rid of it! I bet it is a snake haven in summer too. don't you? Ewww.....^+


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Ha! We'd look kind of bare around here without it. You are so right on, Jackie!


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

Great material. Nandina is also a problem for birds and animals, as those berries are poisonous. Sadly, many rental homes have this planted in the yard already.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Wow, I didn't know that. I hope the birds have a way of knowing they are. Thanks for stopping by!


WriterJanis profile image

WriterJanis 2 years ago from California

I really had no idea that some of these could be so damaging. Thanks for the lesson. I have some of these on my property.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

You are so welcome. But keep in mind that what might be invasive in one area may not be in another. Thanks for stopping by!


Thelma Alberts profile image

Thelma Alberts 2 years ago from Germany

How I wish I have Wisterias in my garden. I have no idea those plants on the photos are invasive. Thanks for the info.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

It is a pretty plant. Thanks for stopping by!


Sal Manila 2 years ago

As I squabble with a new neighbor about a "hedge" between our properties and whether it is an evil "invasive" species, I find that, as others have eluded to, its beauty may be in the eye of the beholder. Give me barberry and wisteria any day! It is in the bamboo jungles of New England where "invasive" takes on new meaning!

At one point or another, is seems like everything came from somewhere else. There must be a magic time when "artificially introduced" earns the right to be called, "indigenous". GRIN


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 2 years ago from Dallas, Texas

What a shame that Wisteria is an invasive species. It's so beautiful. I accidentally discovered an invasive species when I bought a young tree at a flea market. Years later, I found out its true origins. It is truly adept at survival from roots, cuttings, seeds that drop into my containers, all spring up without any help at all from me.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

That's interesting, Peg. Thank stopping stopping by!


d.william profile image

d.william 2 years ago from Somewhere in the south

Great article. I learned a lot from it. I am not sure about the Mimosa trees either. I planted a few of them around my property and they spread like wild fire. They are so beautiful this time of the year with their pink flowers and wonderful aroma. And they make wonderful shade trees for smaller plants that are not tolerant of the direct sunlight.

The biggest problem i have encountered here in north Florida is the Pine beetles. I had several huge pine trees around my 10 acres and most of them were destroyed by those darn beetles. They kill the tree which then falls over and destroys anything they land on.

I had nine of them around my house that were infected and had to have them professionally removed. What an expense that was - and my insurance company refused to help with the cost of their removal. And on top of that, they told me since i brought it to their attention, if one falls on my house they would not pay for the damages since i knew of the dangers they pose.

This is a well written and informative piece of work.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Thanks, yes. I think those Mimosas may have hit invasive status her. I appreciate your comment.


RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

Beautiful plants, but it's important to be aware of how to deal with them, if at all. They can be rough to get rid of once established, but it's not impossible. Lots to learn from some of these comments--an indication of a useful hub!


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Thanks! They are pretty. There are a good many of these invasive species.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

I have seen wisteria get out of control but it looks pretty if kept trimmed and used over trellises as an example. I had no idea that nandina was a problem. We have some miniature nandina plants in our front yard that do not seem to be a problem. Of course I keep them trimmed so they rarely bear the fruit. Kudzu I have seen in driving through parts of Mississippi. It climbs over everything including tall trees!

Invasive species can really wreck havoc with many life forms. Up votes and pinning on my Plants board and will share.


The Dirt Farmer profile image

The Dirt Farmer 2 years ago from United States

A lovely hub, and they're elegant indeed. I love wisteria!


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Thanks Peggy and Jill. Good to see you today!


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 2 years ago from sunny Florida

I have never thought of wisteria as being invasive but now that you point it out I see that it is. The gung ho one here is kudzu...it just takes over.

Beautiful images, Rebecca.

Voted up and shared

Angels are on the way ....


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

It does here too! Thanks for the vote up and the share!


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida

I would love to have Wisteria in my yard. If I did, I'd keep it cut back and contained so it wouldn't spread to other property.

I grew up in the south with Kudzu; that takes over everything!!

Voted UP, and shared.


Healthyannie profile image

Healthyannie 2 years ago from Spain

I am not surprised Wisteria loves it around your way, you probably have the perfect climate for Wisteria.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Yes, it flourishes here. Thanks for stopping by Healthyannie.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Tell me about it!I don't know what it would look like around here if kudzu ever died. There would be a lot of bare spots! Good to see you today, MAry.


thumbi7 profile image

thumbi7 2 years ago from India

beautiful photographs. Thanks for sharing


Denise Handlon profile image

Denise Handlon 2 years ago from North Carolina

Wow, what an awesome hub, Rebecca. I am very familiar with the Wisteria-see it growing everywhere, as with the Nandina. The other two I am not as familiar with, however, you bet I'll be keeping my eye out for them in my area. Thanks! UP/U/I/A and sharing.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Thanks, Denise. how sweet of you to share this!


techygran profile image

techygran 2 years ago from Vancouver Island, Canada

what a great hub! I think our wisteria is okay but we do definitely have to watch those scotch broom and wild blackberries (although people do get a lot of Vitamin C from eating the berries , they can very easily snarl up a whole vacant lot with their long, hostile brambles). I 'm getting a lesson in how plants become invasive in my own front yard with a single Yucca plant that has suddenly decided upon a jungle campaign. As soon as we dig one up, six or more sprout up. But, yes, the beauty is really what sucks us in...


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

Interesting! Thanks for stopping by!


anglnwu profile image

anglnwu 2 years ago

I used to have a wisteria plant in my front yard, trailing the arbor. I love how it looks but never thought of it as being invasive. I can see why, though. All the invasives introduced here are beautiful, so maybe, too much may not be a bad thing after all. Very informative hub!!


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 2 years ago from The Midwest, USA

We have an invasive type of honeysuckle where I live. It is awful, and so hard to get rid of. It truly takes over, and I found it interesting what you said about this happens with plants, and not just animals. Thanks for sharing this information. For instance, I had no idea at all about the wisteria! It is grown on purpose in other places, encouraged around gazebos and the like. So I learned something new!


Pawpawwrites profile image

Pawpawwrites 2 years ago from Kansas

Many years ago, I bought some property that had a healthy stand of Wisteria. I learned to hate the stuff. In sandy soil, it really takes hold quickly.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA Author

True. It's so pretty though!

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