LIBYA'S FUTURE.

What would it be like?

Would unity ever come to Libya after Gadhafi? That is the question that a great deal of people are asking.

The rebels who are now fighting to oust their nation's despotic leader have the support of the United States and it allies; notably NATO being the logistical machinery and military force behind the rebels' objective; and that is to uproot Gadhafi.

However, after the gunfight has seized, would there be conditions that would enable the rebels to form a legitimate government and be able to run Libya without internal friction? Would there be a peaceful Libya?

That is what most people are hoping for; but it must be borne in mind that Libya is a fragment of tribes and cultures; and its people have come under several ancient powers, like the Carthaginians and the Romans. Its history is a pattern of convulsive influences; the last being the invasion of Arab forces in the 16th century and making it part of the Ottoman Empire.

It then became the United Kingdom of Libya, after the Second World War, until Moammar Gadhafi came to power and militarized it.

However, that is history, and the present rebellion is bound to come to an end. Yet, no one can tell what type of a country it will be, after it is all over and the Libyans have reclaimed their freedom from the autocratic Gadhafi regime.

The Traditional National Council, which has now assumed responsibility of governing Libya, has many challenges to face, in terms of bringing all the various tribes together and forming a unified government; asserting its force and control on the myriad of weapons that the regime has stashed away; and keeping extremist factions, who were likely to take that country into becoming a "Jihad state", out of the picture.

At the most, the rebellion had gained world attention and support, because the common outcry was for freedom and democracy to replace the outlandish military style of government that had existed, since Gadhafi took over.

The United States and its European allies, through the United Nations, have gone to the aid of the rebels to usher in victory for their cause. Yet, would the Council be able to hold on to the enormous task of rebuilding Libya?

How the TNC or NTC was formed should be out the question, as it would be after the fact; but would its members be able share Libya's vast oil resources equally, by putting tribal and even racial wranglings aside? (There are racial elements and related problems in Libya).

How about the Gadhafi loyalists? How are they going to be handled by the new government? Would there even be a one and independent Libya as we know it, in the next few months?

These are some of the questions the rest of the world is pondering; with the hope that the Council has plans that can unify the "new Libya".

Gadhafi was an obnoxious individual; however, what would come next? That would be the biggest question of them all.

If the Council could hold Libya in tact, and played its cards right, in terms of its advocacy for peace, freedom and democracy, the whole world, with the U.S. leading the way, would rally behind it to make Libya an important member of the comity of nations; The UNO. Libya's future would be bright.

That is the hope of many Americans for Libya.

Comments 2 comments

HSchneider 5 years ago from Parsippany, New Jersey

Right now the rebels are saying the right things and heading in the right direction. I sincerely hope this holds. If they break up into tribes and factions there could be trouble. Hopefully the world unites to guide them in the right path towards peace and prosperity. Insightful Hub.


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Reynold Jay 5 years ago from Saginaw, Michigan

Let's hope they can get it together and that would be a fairly rare event in the MIddle East. I enjoyed this very much. You have this laid out beautifully and it is easy to understand. Keep up the great HUBS. I must give this an “Up ONE and awesome.” I'm now your fan! RJ

Based upon your HUB, you might enjoy today’s HUB…

http://hubpages.com/education/Ben-takes-a-Quantum-...

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